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Mounting an MRC DC Dual Power Pack

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  • Member since
    January, 2008
  • From: Tampa, Florida
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Mounting an MRC DC Dual Power Pack
Posted by cedarwoodron on Thursday, April 04, 2019 11:41 PM

Has anyone using DC mounted an MRC Dual Throttle power pack to a control shelf board using those large patches of velcro ?

I did this with computer hub boxes in my old classroom lab where everything was plugged into the hub. Back then the hub box did not generate much heat but I worry about the heat output of an MRC power pack affecting the velcro and adhesive.

Cedarwoodron

  • Member since
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  • From: Chi-Town
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Posted by zstripe on Friday, April 05, 2019 5:39 AM

Cedarwoodron,

You should not have any problems at all. They do not get that hot......if it did...there would have to be something wrong with it. I built a analog DC meter out of 1/4'' plywood and stuck it on top of an older MRC 1500 in 1985 that I use as a tester power supply and it is still like I just put it there. That adhesive they use is pretty robust......just make sure You throughly clean, no grease/finger prints on surface where You will apply it. I also affix My MRC CM 20 hand helds to the side of the control panel with just a 1'' piece......no heat, but it stays put for all these yrs.

Take Care! Big Smile

Frank

 

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  • From: Tampa, Florida
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Posted by cedarwoodron on Friday, April 05, 2019 11:00 AM

Thanks Frank- I recall the old gold MRC control pack I had as a kid got a bit warm, being a metal enclosure. 

Cedarwoodron

  • Member since
    October, 2007
  • From: Fullerton, California
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Posted by hornblower on Friday, April 05, 2019 2:16 PM

I used an old "gold" MRC Dual Control pack on a previous layout where I did indeed mount the pack to an inclined control panel.  I first drilled out the rivets that held the "gold" cover onto the black base.  Next, I drilled holes through a couple of the "feet" dimples in the bottom of the black base.  After positioning the power pack on the control panel, a couple of screws secured the black base to the panel.  I then replaced the "gold" cover and replaced the pop rivets. This pack got warm but never hot.  

Hornblower

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Posted by zstripe on Friday, April 05, 2019 2:52 PM

cedarwoodron

Thanks Frank- I recall the old gold MRC control pack I had as a kid got a bit warm, being a metal enclosure. 

Cedarwoodron

 

I had a Golden Tri-Pac, that was 3 separate power pac's in one, with the old Rheostat control, that got warm, but not hot. As a matter of fact, I still have it, but don't use it for anything. Back in the early 60's it was 45.00 and We thought that was a lot of money.....LOL

You should not have any problems........

Take Care! Big Smile

Frank

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    July, 2014
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Posted by tommymr on Friday, April 05, 2019 3:19 PM

Instead of velcro, you might try 3M Dual Lock.  Its what's used to attach our toll transponder to the windshield,  has to hold up in all sorts of car interior temperatures.  Haven't had any fail yet.  

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  • From: Tampa, Florida
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Posted by cedarwoodron on Friday, April 05, 2019 7:47 PM

Well that might be good for a more permanent solution but I'm building a hardboard (Masonite ) shelf for the power pack and the block switches- nothing fancy, but if I need to change out the power pack or rebuild the shelf I don't want to have a hard time removing it.

Cedarwoodron

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Posted by PC101 on Friday, April 05, 2019 11:11 PM

Heres another way the MRC tech II Dualpower 2800 can be mounted.

On the bottom of the unit there are deep holes with screws in them to hold the unit together. Using the far rear holes and the forward most holes, heres the plan. In a rectangle mark off four holes on your surface, short measurement 4-15/32'' will be side to side, long measurement 5-23/32'' will be front to back. Drill four 5/32'' holes though your surface at the corners where the lines meet. Install 1-1/4'' long 8-32 screws from the bottom of your surface. A nut should be placed on top of the screws and tightened. If you follow this template, the holes in the bottom of the Tech ll 2800 will fit neatly on the remaining length of the screws. In order to move the unit, just lift it off the screws and you can move it to another location.

I would have linked the picture of the drawing and posted it here but I need to have a photo site host of some sort. That's one thing, the only thing, I think is strange about this Forum I guess.     

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Posted by tommymr on Saturday, April 06, 2019 6:58 AM

cedarwoodron

Well that might be good for a more permanent solution but I'm building a hardboard (Masonite ) shelf for the power pack and the block switches- nothing fancy, but if I need to change out the power pack or rebuild the shelf I don't want to have a hard time removing it.

Cedarwoodron

 

The dual lock is not permanant.  Instead of like regular velcro, it is a harder plastic.  There are mushrooom shaped nubs on both sides that interlock with each other.

  • Member since
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  • From: Tampa, Florida
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Posted by cedarwoodron on Sunday, April 07, 2019 9:33 AM

Fortunately I'm handy enough not to need a photo- your description is more than sufficient for me to follow. It sounds like overkill but I'm going to combine your screw idea and a velcro-or similar mounting patch. If I do that, only a nearby rocket launch would be able to budge the control pack (I live in FL)!

SmileSmile

Cedarwoodron

 

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Posted by emdmike on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 9:30 PM

I have seen throttles on a slanted board held in place with some wood trim cut to make a "cubbie" to hold the throttle in place.  They ususal use some thin trim wood, about the thinkness of a simple picture frame, then if the throttle ever fails, its simply changed, enlarged or removed as needed.   I miss the days of the copper/golden throttles(prefer the copper color myself).  After MRC went to plastic for the Tech2 line, they just felt cheap and looked cheap.   Mike the Aspie

Silly NT's, I have Asperger's Syndrome

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