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My First Hunk Of Brass

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  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: 4610 Metre's North of the Fortyninth on the left coast of Canada
  • 5,084 posts
My First Hunk Of Brass
Posted by BATMAN on Saturday, July 07, 2018 3:45 PM

I like to peruse actions going on around the world as sometimes they have unique offerings. I found one such auction at an auction house in a small farming community. I got this for $36.00.

  

  

I don't think it has ever been taken out of the box (until now) the wheels have not a mark on them. The foam is like new.

Great Northern operated into Vancouver so it can be seen on the layout getting contract service at the C.P. roundhouse.

It is my first brass engine and I am hoping to paint it up sometime this winter. There is a first time for everything.Laugh 

Not sure what it is worth, but for $36.00 it is a good start into the brass world.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 8,197 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, July 07, 2018 4:31 PM

Nice find, Brent, and at a good price, too! Thumbs UpThumbs Up

I'm not familiar with that particular locomotive, but any United locos, on which I've worked for others, were well-built, with decent detail and excellent running qualities.

Wayne

  • Member since
    May, 2004
  • 5,231 posts
Posted by 7j43k on Saturday, July 07, 2018 4:31 PM

A lovely locomotive.

I have one, also.  I bought mine back in the olden days.  And paid more than $36.  So I will say that I think you got a great deal, there.

Congrats,

 

Ed

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 2,376 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, July 07, 2018 8:25 PM

You can't go wrong at that price... heck... I would give you $35.00 US just for the tender!

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I only have two United locomotives, and they are built solid and easy to repair/maintain.

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Good find.

.

-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    May, 2004
  • 5,231 posts
Posted by 7j43k on Saturday, July 07, 2018 10:15 PM

OK.  Honeymoon's over.

First.  It HAS been taken out of the box.  There's a sort of crossover piece above the coal pile.  The model is delivered with that in place.  It has been cut and removed so that the oil bunker can fit.  Did it myself.  No big deal, but it ain't untouched.

Second.  You really should consider replacing the motor.  That would be the big thing in the middle of the cab.  Having that in the cab is a, uh, distraction.

Third.  Make sure it runs nicely before going too far.  Find the binds and stuff and fix them.

Fourth.  This engine came in two paint schemes.  The early one had a green-painted boiler jacket, and cylinder jackets.  That was later changed to black.  The smokebox was "not-black".  And also the firebox, I think.  The GOOD NEWS is that if your paint job doesn't turn out, you can strip it in about an hour and try again--something that can be VERY difficult with plastic models.

 

OK.  Enough negativity.  A GREAT deal on a very nice locomotive.  There have been made GN passenger cars (in brass) for it to pull.  Just a thought.

 

Ed

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 8,512 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Saturday, July 07, 2018 10:22 PM

Brent:

Nice catch!

Please keep us posted on your progress.

Dave

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: 4610 Metre's North of the Fortyninth on the left coast of Canada
  • 5,084 posts
Posted by BATMAN on Sunday, July 08, 2018 2:53 PM

Thanks guys.

Ed, I was wondering about the cross piece as I saw it on the model in some You-Tube videos I was watching of it. I must admit having the cab full of engine is a bit of a turnoff and was wondering about that. If a new motor will solve the problem, then a new motor it will be. This will be a learning project more than anything for me as I want it DCC and I will want lights in it. It is going to be fun when I get started. I will be seeking guidance when the time comes.

Is there any way to tell if it has been run? The wheels have not a speck on them, other than that I have no idea.

The original MSRP was $110.00 in 1972 according to Brass Trains. I have had two offers through PMs, however, I will at the very least let it age a while longer and hope to get to it this winter.Pirate

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1

  • Member since
    May, 2004
  • 5,231 posts
Posted by 7j43k on Sunday, July 08, 2018 3:49 PM

Brent,

That crosspiece has an interesting history.  The engines were delivered as coal-burners.  GN was, for awhile, enamored of tilting the coal bunker to slide the coal forward for the fireman.  Yes, really.  That bit of metalwork on the tender was a reinforcement for the sides, including tying both sides together (the "over-the-top" bit).  At some point, the coal-tipper concept got left behind, and was deactivated.  And, certainly, that happened before or during the conversion to oil.  Partly because you don't need it for oil, and partly because you couldn't fit the oil bunker in.  On my model, it was cut a long time ago, because I prefer oil burners to coal.

I've seen a picture somewhere of the tipper in action, but I can't recall where.

Also, if there was a powered stoker, you wouldn't need a tipper.

Seemed like a good idea at the time, I suppose.

 

I know MINE hasn't been run.  Anyway, if the wheels look brand new, they are.  Essentially.  If it was run, it wasn't enough to matter, or it would show.

Yeah, I certainly paid more for mine then you did for yours.  And that was with "old" dollars.

One thing that holds down the price on these is that there were quite a few made--they aren't rare.  So, if a guy hankers for one, and passes up, there'll be another along shortly.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: 4610 Metre's North of the Fortyninth on the left coast of Canada
  • 5,084 posts
Posted by BATMAN on Monday, July 09, 2018 5:20 PM

Thanks Ed, that is interesting about the tipper and explains some of the photos I have been looking at. I was going to paint it black, but seeing as how I am always trying to go with the early years, I think green may be more eye catching for the layout.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1

  • Member since
    May, 2004
  • 5,231 posts
Posted by 7j43k on Monday, July 09, 2018 6:18 PM

Brent,

Yup, that'll look quite nice, for sure.  I think the GN painted some of the green "bits" black, though.  The concept starts with just the sheet metal wrapping, after all.

Here's a couple of very late and very unusual green GN locos:

 

 

They may not be accurate for the H-5, but they do give you a hint of where the green and black COULD go.

Color pix of GN steam with the green are pretty rare.  The book "Great NOrthern Steam & Electric in Color" by David Hickox has a good selection.  There's even one of an H-5 in Seattle that is kind of helpful--though dirty green kind of looks like black--so there's a problem there.

 

Ed

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