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Tichy Wrecking Crane

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Tichy Wrecking Crane
Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, April 15, 2018 6:39 PM

Like my recently finished DCC Stewart F3, the Tichy crane has sat in the box for 30 years.  I have Champ black and white decals. 

For those of you who have actually built one, what color did you paint it and did you paint it before assemby?  There are oodles of parts buried inside.   Most cranes are black in the pictures, but the one at the museum in Ogden is gray, though it could be a faded/weatherd silver.  I've seen later cranes yellow or red. 

My freelance Nothern & Potomac does not have to follow a specific prototype color scheme.

In exchange for your advice, I am sharing this video on one in modern demonstration.

 

 
 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, April 15, 2018 7:11 PM

I painted mine with Pollyscale Steam Power Black IIRC, which was the faded black color.

 IMG_7311_fix by Edmund, on Flickr

Because the majority of parts were so small, pre-painting was not really an option since I was using Tenax cement at the time. Pre-painting would have required scraping the paint off or using ACC, neither of which sounded like a good option.

I seem to recall being able to paint assemblies such as the engine/winch; boom and cab parts then doing the final assembly and minor touch-up.

It seems to me that bright colors are a later preference. Even then, such as the B&O when they went to bright Chinese-red for their wreck train cars, the big hook was still black.

  RH_new_TO4 by Edmund, on Flickr

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, April 15, 2018 7:37 PM

I pre-painted some of the interior mechanical stuff, but most was airbrushed after assembly, using a mixed boxcar red.  I brush-painted the cable grooves in the sheaves after initial assembly.  The sliding doors are in consideration of Canadian winters...

One important addition, not included in the box nor mentioned in the instructions, is a piece of piano wire, installed in the floor of the cab and extending outward within the boom.  It's meant to place downward pressure on the boom, which helps to keep those "cables" in place.  
When not on the layout, the crane and its tender are stored upright, in a box, but some unavoidable rough handling one time caused the cables to come off their respective sheaves, even though a spring (not strong enough, apparently) had been installed. 
It was quite the task to reposition the cables, almost to where I was considering disassembly for better access, but I finally got everything back where it belongs.

The photos remind me that I should add some windows to all of my crane-tender flatcars.

Wayne

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Posted by maxman on Sunday, April 15, 2018 8:03 PM

A little off-topic, but has anyone ever seen an article or can offer any advice as to how to convert the crane from steam to diesel power?

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Posted by rrebell on Sunday, April 15, 2018 9:15 PM

Mine is rattle canned flat black.

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Posted by Attuvian on Sunday, April 15, 2018 10:20 PM

doctorwayne

One important addition, not included in the box nor mentioned in the instructions, is a piece of piano wire, installed in the floor of the cab and extending outward within the boom.  It's meant to place downward pressure on the boom, which helps to keep those "cables" in place.  

Wayne

 
Dr. Wayne,
 
Is it possible to get a close-up at any angle to show this add-on?  I'd like to steal this from you to add to that handsome handful I have pilfered from your brain and bench to date. 
 
Wink
 
John
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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, April 15, 2018 10:30 PM

I'll see if I can get a photo that shows it, John, and will post it here.

Wayne

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Posted by G Paine on Sunday, April 15, 2018 10:59 PM

maxman
A little off-topic, but has anyone ever seen an article or can offer any advice as to how to convert the crane from steam to diesel power?

A lot of steam cranes were converted to diesel at the end of steam era. A simple change would be to cut off the steam boiler stack, cover the hole with thin styrene sheet and add a piece of wire of a size to be a diesel engine exhaust.

George In Midcoast Maine, 'bout halfway up the Rockland branch 

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Posted by Attuvian on Sunday, April 15, 2018 11:27 PM

doctorwayne

I'll see if I can get a photo that shows it, John, and will post it here.

Wayne

 
You da man, Wayne.  For a rather large number.
 
John
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Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, April 15, 2018 11:33 PM

G Paine
A lot of steam cranes were converted to diesel at the end of steam era.

In addition to Mr. Paine's modifications, you could squeeze one of these in the housing for added realism.

https://www.walthers.com/scenemaster-tm-flatcar-load-power-generator-2

Maybe cut the side and fit the radiator so it is open to outside air?

Sounds like a fun project!

Regards, Ed

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Posted by j. c. on Monday, April 16, 2018 1:04 AM

maxman

A little off-topic, but has anyone ever seen an article or can offer any advice as to how to convert the crane from steam to diesel power?

 

don't know about artical but this looks like a conversion  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bo/bo940501ac.jpg

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, April 16, 2018 2:13 AM

John, here are a couple of photos of the "tension spring".  I used .040" piano wire, bent into an L-shape.  After slipping it inside the boom, the short foot of the "L" was inserted, from the bottom, into a pre-drilled hole in the lower front cable drum.  I probably should have shortened it more, as it sticks out of the top of the drum, as you can see.  I didn't feel like taking it back out, though, and don't find that it's all that objectionable. 
The crane can now be turned upside down (good for major derailments of the crane, especially off a couple of my higher bridges) without the boom flopping about, or the cables leaving their assigned places.

Here's the lower end of the spring....

...and the upper end...

The pressure point on the boom is just to the right of the cabled sheaves in the third photo.
I added the spring after the crane was in-service, and honestly don't recall how I got the foot of the "L" into the hole.  At the time, all of the cables were off their sheaves, so it was possible to lift the boom as much as was necessary, but the hole, from the bottom, is not in a position where the wire could easily have been inserted.  There's a slight chance that the cable drum was put in place, originally, without being cemented, but can't say for sure.  The angle of the wire at the base of the "L" is a bit sharper than 90°, but that's probably due to where I was able to drill the hole.

This fix has been in place for several years, I think, with no adverse effects on any part of the crane.

I added a similar spring to my Walthers American derrick...

...but haven't yet done this one, picked up off the "used" table at a nearby hobbyshop, for five bucks....

I added roof hatches for coal and water, and a few other details, including the smokestack - seem to recall that it either didn't have one, or it wasn't very prominent - looked more like a diesel-powered crane.  I'm guessing it's from ROCO, as the only info on the model is "MADE IN AUSTRIA", cast on the bottom.

Wayne

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Posted by Southgate on Monday, April 16, 2018 2:31 AM

I have no info for ya, but thank you for the video! I learned a couple new things just watching it. Dan

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Posted by Attuvian on Monday, April 16, 2018 6:29 AM

doctorwayne

...and the upper end...

The pressure point on the boom is just to the right of the cabled sheaves in the third photo.

Wayne

 

Thanks, Wayne.  Obliged.  Again.

It looks like the new tension rod rests with downward pressure at the upper end against the cross bracing on the underside of the boom.  Is that correct?

BTW, nice steal and update on the ROCO.  And a tidy fit along with its idler car on your turntable.  How big is the TT?

BTW-II, by the times of your posts, do you ever sleep?

Wink

John

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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, April 16, 2018 6:39 AM

Great tips and photos. How mobile is the boom normally?

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by dknelson on Monday, April 16, 2018 10:09 AM

doctorwayne
haven't yet done this one, picked up off the "used" table at a nearby hobbyshop, for five bucks.... I added roof hatches for coal and water, and a few other details, including the smokestack - seem to recall that it either didn't have one, or it wasn't very prominent - looked more like a diesel-powered crane. I'm guessing it's from ROCO, as the only info on the model is "MADE IN AUSTRIA", cast on the bottom. Wayne

Yes, AHM sold that one for years.  I might still have one somewhere, weathered but not otherwise modified.  It was "modern" enough looking that I assume it was meant to be a diesel powered prototype.

On the HO Seeker website you can find it in the 1967 AHM catalog, under Covered Hopper/MOW. 

Dave Nelson

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Posted by maxman on Monday, April 16, 2018 10:28 AM

j. c.
don't know about artical but this looks like a conversion http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bo/bo940501ac.jpg

Thanks.  A little bigger than the Tichy, but maybe I'll get some ideas.

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Posted by maxman on Monday, April 16, 2018 10:30 AM

gmpullman
In addition to Mr. Paine's modifications, you could squeeze one of these in the housing for added realism. https://www.walthers.com/scenemaster-tm-flatcar-load-power-generator-2

Sold out, but by golly I think I bought a package of those at a train show recently.  Now if I can find it..........

 

Thanks

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, April 16, 2018 10:45 AM

Attuvian
It looks like the new tension rod rests with downward pressure at the upper end against the cross bracing on the underside of the boom. Is that correct?



That's right, John, a very simple set-up.

Attuvian
BTW, nice steal and update on the ROCO. And a tidy fit along with its idler car on your turntable. How big is the TT?

The turntable is 89' long - as big as I could fit into the available real estate...

It's basically a block of wood mounted on a electric mixer shaft, with Atlas girders stuck on the sides - manually operated.

Attuvian
BTW-II, by the times of your posts, do you ever sleep?

Longtime nightshift worker - in my blood, I guess.

BigDaddy
How mobile is the boom normally?

Normally, the boom is in the lowest position allowed by the length the builder leaves the cables, but it can raise to its highest limit, simply by lifting it.  Unfortunately, that action allows all of the cable to come off the sheaves.

dknelson
Yes, AHM sold that one for years. I might still have one somewhere, weathered but not otherwise modified. It was "modern" enough looking that I assume it was meant to be a diesel powered prototype. On the HO Seeker website you can find it in the 1967 AHM catalog, under Covered Hopper/MOW.

Thanks for that confirmation, Dave.

Wayne

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, April 16, 2018 11:27 AM

maxman
Sold out, but by golly I think I bought a package of those at a train show recently.

It took me a while to learn this — but, IF I think I might need an item anytime in the future I try to get a few, and maybe an extra, for that unknown future project.

Funny thing about those Life-Like/Walthers Scene Masters items. Some things disappeared pretty quickly like those generators and the Massey Ferguson tractors. Other things, like the corn harvesters and the big gears seem to be multiplying.

I made a wheel lathe using the big gears:

 IMG_8674_fix by Edmund, on Flickr

And the "Ductwork" flat car load is very versatile for structure use:

 IMG_5906 by Edmund, on Flickr

It can be snapped apart and re-configured Yes

Regards, Ed

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Posted by 7j43k on Monday, April 16, 2018 5:20 PM

Seems to me that not too many of the Tichy-style 100 ton cranes were converted to diesel.  I think it was more the big guy:  200 and 250 ton.

I'd love to see an example that proves me wrong, though.

 

Ed

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Posted by Little Timmy on Monday, April 16, 2018 10:16 PM

I painted mine with Floquill Grimy Black, and used the same Champ decal's your using. ( I bought 4 set's of Camps decal's.... figured I would be building a few more...)

I built it straght out of the box, exept for the BB's they included for "ballast".

I carved a piece of Lead to fit into the floor cavity.

I sold it ( actually I "traded" it for 2 brass engin's ) so I dont have any picture's to share .... sorry.

Rust...... It's a good thing !

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Posted by Two Trains on Tuesday, April 17, 2018 3:02 PM
Really great work in here guys. IT's always interesting seeing different takes on the same or similar models.
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Posted by gmpullman on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 9:16 AM

doctorwayne
One important addition, not included in the box nor mentioned in the instructions, is a piece of piano wire, installed in the floor of the cab and extending outward within the boom. 

I just happened across one of my photos of a more modern crane on the Wheeling & Lake Erie.

 IMG_2655 by Edmund, on Flickr

Notice the two "torsion bars" on the upper side of the boom. Again proving that there's a prototype for everything. The Wheeling must have turned their crane upside-down once and learn't their lesson!

 IMG_2656 by Edmund, on Flickr

 IMG_2654 by Edmund, on Flickr

Telescoping brass tube and a small compression spring, say removed from a disposable lighter, may be used in conjunction with the piano wire or in stead of.

I just bought another Tichy crane kit. I enjoyed building the first one so much I want to do it again. I sure hope someone makes the Jordan B2 Erie again. I recently saw one go for nearly $70 on Ebay! That is another nice, little crane that can have many uses on the layout.

Thank You, Ed

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Posted by 7j43k on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 6:42 PM

gmpullman

Notice the two "torsion bars" on the upper side of the boom. Again proving that there's a prototype for everything. The Wheeling must have turned their crane upside-down once and learn't their lesson.

 

Those are "boom stops", and they're pretty common.  Here's what I've seen more (non-telescoping):

 

They show up on lattice-style booms on mobile mounts.  Which the W&LE item is.

 

Ed

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Posted by gmpullman on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 7:12 PM

7j43k
Those are "boom stops"

Thank you for the correct terminology. I can see their function now that you point it out, hence the quote marks in my original reply.

In either case, if a modeler wanted to apply resistance in order to keep the lines taught, say on a Walthers American crane with lattice type boom, this could provide one method.

Thank you, Ed

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