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Winter Layouts

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  • Member since
    December, 2016
  • 83 posts
Winter Layouts
Posted by Shock Control on Monday, December 04, 2017 9:00 PM

I put up a fairly elaborate winter layout under the tree during the holidays.  

It made me wonder if anyone has, or has attempted, a permanent winter layout. If so, what do you use for snow, and is it hard to keep clean?  Do sections of snow have to be periodically replaced? 

  • Member since
    May, 2010
  • 1,859 posts
Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, December 04, 2017 9:32 PM

I do a Christmas train every year it's our turn to host Christmas.  It's a Hawthorn Village Green Bay Packer thing that my daughter subscribed me to back in 2007.

These are a mixture of the old(2009) and newer version (2015)  I'll be setting it up next year, and take more pictures, as we are down sizing, and want to sell off what I can.

Here's the 2009 version:

And some later versions, after double tracking:

Looking forward to setting it up next year.  The Hawthorn Village uses Bachmann Plus locos, and the F7 runs smooth all night long, along with the Mehano steam engine.

Mike.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Chamberlain, ME
  • 4,219 posts
Posted by G Paine on Monday, December 04, 2017 10:45 PM

For the past 2 years Boothbay Railway Village has contracted with the LL Bean store in Freeport, ME to set up a winter and outdoors layout which runs in their Children's Dept during the Christmas season.

George In Midcoast Maine, 'bout halfway up the Rockland branch 

  • Member since
    May, 2010
  • 1,859 posts
Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, December 04, 2017 10:59 PM

I just noticed, I never did address your question about snow.  I use the Woodland Scenic stuff.  I vacuum it up when I take the layout down, and add fresh "snow" when I set it up.  My layout is up and running for a month, so I don't know how the "always winter" layouts do it.  I suspect there are as many ways and methods as there are for modeling trees and foliage.

Do a search, and see what you come up.  I know there is a modeler on MRH that does a New England layout that is always winter, and it looks great.

Mike.

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • 479 posts
Posted by Track fiddler on Monday, December 04, 2017 11:17 PM

Quite a few years ago I bought the Target Greatland Express train set. It is basically an O scale size set with plastic track, a steam engine, tender, cars and a caboose. The batteries go in the tender.

I started collecting them, I have three sets. I pick one out of the three to run around the tree every year. Sometimes I put more cars on from one of the other sets. This seems to eat the batteries a little quicker though.

They could become collector items someday. Who knows?

Happy Holidays   Track Fiddler

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 298,789 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 05, 2017 12:44 AM

Noch of Germany makes a number of interesting products for permanent winter scenes, including a type of "white grass" to be applied with a electrostatic applicator, which gives a nice snow covered surface.

Take a look here!

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Staten Island NY
  • 1,254 posts
Posted by joe323 on Tuesday, December 05, 2017 6:10 AM

My Hanukkah train will not appear this year as the layout move has precluded my Hanukkah and Christmas decoration.

Joe Staten Island West 

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: North Dakota
  • 7,560 posts
Posted by BroadwayLion on Tuesday, December 05, 2017 12:21 PM

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: St. Paul
  • 328 posts
Posted by garya on Tuesday, December 05, 2017 8:03 PM

Didn't Model Railroader update the Soo Red Wing project layout as a winter layout a few years ago?  I remember they used drywall compound for snow, and I think marble powder, as it glitters?

Gary
  • Member since
    May, 2012
  • 1,400 posts
Posted by angelob6660 on Tuesday, December 05, 2017 9:51 PM

I thought of building a winter layout covered in that white stuff. Unfortunately I thought of the same reason stated above, keeping it all clean.

If I did do a winter scene I would get different freight cars and locomotives to be covered in snow. But I getting it stuck would be a difficult challenge.

Modeling the G.N.O. Railway, The Diamond Route.

Amtrak America, 1971-Present.

  • Member since
    July, 2017
  • 98 posts
Posted by marksrailroad on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 2:58 AM

No winter or Christmas layout as so to speak but I do have a snow capped mountain and pine trees on my regular layout...

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Southern California
  • 977 posts
Posted by Lone Wolf and Santa Fe on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 1:16 PM

When I was a little kid I had a book about modeling scenery for Lionel 0-27 layouts. It suggested having different seasons at various locations on one layout. I liked the idea and it stuck with me. Of course in southern California every day is summer. The only question is it going to be 85 or 105 degrees today? So on my current layout I have 3 different seasons depending on the elevation. It’s summer in the valley, fall in the foothills, and winter in the mountains. Here are some pictures of the mountains area. The snow is paper towels soaked in plaster and painted white because sometimes plaster has a slight yellow hue. Some areas are also covered in DecoArt Snow Texture. https://www.michaels.com/decoart-snow-tex/10501072.html
Snow is easy to keep clean because dust is usually white anyway.

Santa Fe C44-9W

Lone Wolf Cafe and General Store

A log truck passes a cross country skiier on a snow covered road

Wolf Mountain Ski Area

the bouncing bumble from Rudolph thr Red Nose Reindeer

Modeling a fictional version of California set in the 1990s Lone Wolf and Santa Fe Railroad
  • Member since
    August, 2006
  • 1,105 posts
Posted by trainnut1250 on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 2:39 PM

Two of the best winter modelers I've seen:

Rand Hood - MR articles in the 90's - great scenes

Mike Confalone MRH regular - very nice winter stuff

 

Guy

see stuff at: the Willoughby Line Site

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Spartanburg, SC
  • 1,457 posts
Posted by GP-9_Man11786 on Thursday, December 07, 2017 2:51 PM

I do most of my modeling during the winter. Even though I live in a state with very short, mild winters, I find the season to be bleak and depressing. So why would I want to model it? I love to come upstairs and see my favorite part of Pennsylvania on typical summer day. I think this is part of the reason we don't see many winter layouts.

However, there are some masterfully-done winter layouts. Paul Dolkos old B&M New Hamshire division was one of them. It featured bare trees, dormant grass but no snow.

Modeling the Pennsylvania Railroad in N Scale.

www.prr-nscale.blogspot.com 

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Mpls/St.Paul
  • 10,162 posts
Posted by wjstix on Saturday, December 09, 2017 2:58 PM

My layout is set in winter, but more like around the first light snow of the year - more of a dusting of snow rather than deep drifts.

 http://cs.trains.com/mrr/m/mrr-layouts/2290019.aspx

 

Stix
  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • 767 posts
Posted by NWP SWP on Saturday, December 09, 2017 4:25 PM

My question is how does the snow work on layouts? Is it removable? I model the west US desert mountains to forest covered mountains.

Steven

Crooner, Imagineer, High School Senior, and President of the NWP-SWP System.

Modeling the combined lines of the Southern Pacific, Western Pacific, and Northern Pacific after a fictional Depression Era merger forming the SouthWestern Pacific and NorthWestern Pacific Railroads. SP, WP, and NP operations remain independent but also operate alongside NWP and SWP equipment.

Hook'em Longhorns! 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Southern California
  • 977 posts
Posted by Lone Wolf and Santa Fe on Sunday, December 10, 2017 11:55 AM

NWP SWP

My question is how does the snow work on layouts? Is it removable? I model the west US desert mountains to forest covered mountains.

 

My snow is not removable. It is there to stay. The snow is only in the higher elevations. Once you get below the snowline then the plaster is painted a sandy tan color and has gound cover and trees without snow.

Modeling a fictional version of California set in the 1990s Lone Wolf and Santa Fe Railroad

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