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scale trains rivet counters

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scale trains rivet counters
Posted by dh28473 on Saturday, August 12, 2017 9:36 AM

what is the difference between rivet counters and operators aside the price?Is the more costly one better? This is for a new boxcar i don't mind spending the extra.

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Posted by tstage on Saturday, August 12, 2017 9:44 AM

From my understand and as the name implies, the rivet counters version would have more detail and, therefore, cost more.  You could liken it to Bowser's "Traditional" vs "Executive" lines, or Athearn's "Ready to Roll" vs "Genesis" lines.  In other words - nice vs REALLY nice.

While the current releases by Scale Trains look nice, all of it is too modern for my layout.  I'm hoping they'll release a unique piece of rolling stock at some point that fits a 40s era theme.

Tom

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Posted by selector on Saturday, August 12, 2017 10:00 AM

Time is money.  Every bit of time put into each model prior to their packaging and shipment overseas costs the manufacturers in China money because they have to recruit, select, train, and then pay tiny hands (almost always young women) to handle implements and to assemble the different versions.  I doubt the drives are different, but......who knows.  Instead, I suspect it's the tiny details, as Tom says, that make the difference. Even in the case of molded-on details, someone had to be paid to make the tooling, and such skills don't come cheaply. Each other detail, wipers, shades, piping, tanks, ditch lights....they cost to produce and then to place on the item consistently so that one matches the other.

Brass has always been the dreamy standard, and boy, do ya payz fer it.  Today, the best non-brass is running upwards of $500 unless on a fire sale, but brass is still upwards of $1000 if you want a new issue nobody but the assembler has handled.  And that's for modestly priced HO brass.  You should see what O scale is going for. Surprise

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, August 12, 2017 10:08 AM

I saw the rivet counter Scale Trains models at the National Train Show last weekend, and they are beautiful. If you are not going to photograph your models, or if you ever plan to handle them, you might be happier with the lower priced options.

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Those rivet counter models look fragile. Beauty has its drawbacks.

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by 7j43k on Saturday, August 12, 2017 10:22 AM

dh28473

what is the difference between rivet counters and operators aside the price?Is the more costly one better? This is for a new boxcar i don't mind spending the extra.

 

 

I don't see a Scale Trains boxcar offered in either versions.

 

What are you talking about?

 

 

Ed

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Posted by Lone Wolf and Santa Fe on Saturday, August 12, 2017 1:53 PM

Scale Trains makes four different lines. Museum Quality are the best followed by Rivet Counter, then Operator, and lastly Kit Classics which are unassembled kits. The difference is the amount of detail. Museum Quality have the most details while Kit Classics are similar to the old Athearn Blue Box kits. Not all models are available in all lines. I think currently the boxcar is only available in Kit Classics.

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Posted by Bayfield Transfer Railway on Saturday, August 12, 2017 2:23 PM

Truthfully, when I'm operating, with one eye on the timetable and one on the track, and the throttle or paperwork in my hands, the cars could be old American Flyer ones and I don't think I'd notice.

 

Michael Mornard

Bringing the North Woods to South Dakota!

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Posted by tstage on Saturday, August 12, 2017 2:41 PM

Lone Wolf and Santa Fe

The difference is the amount of detail. Museum Quality have the most details while Kit Classics are similar to the old Athearn Blue Box kits.

Lone Wolf,

Do you mean similar as in the lack of details?  Or, do the four Scale Train lines not share the same shell/chassis?

Tom

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Posted by Lone Wolf and Santa Fe on Saturday, August 12, 2017 5:35 PM

tstage

 

 
Lone Wolf and Santa Fe

The difference is the amount of detail. Museum Quality have the most details while Kit Classics are similar to the old Athearn Blue Box kits.

 

 

Lone Wolf,

Do you mean similar as in the lack of details?  Or, do the four Scale Train lines not share the same shell/chassis?

Tom

 

Currently the models in the Kit Classics line are only available in that line.

Models in the Rivet Counter line are the same as The Operator Line except the Rivet Counter models have more factory applied details than The Operator Line. The extra details are available separately so you can upgrade the Operator Line to Rivet Counter at home.

From their website: "The Operator HO Scale SD40-2 is designed for modelers who enjoy running dimensionally accurate trains and are less concerned about factory applied detail parts. The Operator SD40-2 is based upon the Rivet Counter SD40-2 body and mechanism." 

Modeling a fictional version of California set in the 1990s Lone Wolf and Santa Fe Railroad
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Posted by wp8thsub on Saturday, August 12, 2017 10:00 PM

The different lines also have variations in quality of the parts used.  For example, an Operator model might have plastic parts where the Rivet Counter would have etched or cast metal.  The rolling stock models have different trucks.  Depending on the model, it may be impractical to upgrade to Rivet Counter level of finish without a great deal of disassembly and/or repainting.

There are also omissions - Operator models lack a lot of the small lettering, along with most of the separate grabs.  Many of the smaller details are left off. They typically have simplified paint schemes.

dh28473
This is for a new boxcar i don't mind spending the extra.

As has been noted, Scale Trains doesn't currently have a boxcar other than the Evans 5100 in the Kit Classics line.  I think all the detail is cast on save for the brake wheel.  The models are missing a significant amount of the prototype lettering and other markings, and much of what is there is generic.  Many of the paint schemes are fantasy schemes or don't belong on these cars.

Rob Spangler

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