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Is MTH Arched Bridge Same as Atlas'?

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Is MTH Arched Bridge Same as Atlas'?
Posted by Capt. Grimek on Thursday, April 20, 2017 9:29 PM

Looked at the MTH Arched Bridge at modeltrainstuff.com and it looks to be the same mold as the old Atlas Arched Bridge (also 18" L.)  Does anyone know if it is and/or if any more realistic casting changes have been made?

I'd use it for a highway bridge so hopefully the track deck is easily covered over with sheet styrene street material.

Thanks if you have one, seen one, etc.

Jim

Raised on the Erie Lackawanna Mainline- Supt. of the Black River Transfer & Terminal R.R.

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Posted by SouthPenn on Thursday, April 20, 2017 10:06 PM

I have a new MTH arched bridge and, one of the old Atlas, and one of the new Atlas arch bridges. The MTH bridge seems to be identical to the old Atlas bridge. The new Atlas bridge is cheap and junk IMHO. 

South Penn
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Posted by Paul Graf on Friday, April 21, 2017 7:37 AM

The "old" Atlas arched bridge (and pony truss bridge) were actually produced by Roco in Austria, and sold in the US by Atlas.

 

 

Paul Graf

Atlas Model Railroad Company

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Friday, April 21, 2017 10:12 AM

Capt. Grimek
I'd use it for a highway bridge so hopefully the track deck is easily covered over with sheet styrene street material.

It's really too narrow to use as a highway bridge without major surgery.

Inside the structure, edge-to-edge is only 2 1/4 inches.  It's only 1 3/8 between the walkways on the sides, where the track goes.  As I recall, the walkways are applied separately and could be omitted.  But, the top girders are a single piece, and to widen the bridge to highway size would require an entire new top section.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by DSchmitt on Friday, April 21, 2017 10:47 AM

MisterBeasley
Inside the structure, edge-to-edge is only 2 1/4 inches.  It's only 1 3/8 between the walkways on the sides, where the track goes.  As I recall, the walkways are applied separately and could be omitted.  But, the top girders are a single piece, and to widen the bridge to highway size would require an entire new top section.

It could be a one lane road bridge with signs at each end to warn motorist. 

  

A traffic signal at each end to control occupancy would be an interesting sometimes used prototypical feature. 

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Friday, April 21, 2017 1:24 PM

MTH makes a similar bridge in O-gauge, which would work better for a multi-lane highway.  It is longer, though, and comes pre-assembled, not as a kit.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Friday, April 21, 2017 2:16 PM

The rural areas in this region are still full of one lane highway bridges like the examples above.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by KemacPrr on Friday, April 21, 2017 2:31 PM

I used a couple of the old Atlas bridges years ago to make hiway bridges. I cut the bottom piece down the middle and extended it with some Evergreen beams and a styrene hiway base. For the top I bought some Central Valley girders and made my own top girder support section. Not that much work and you end up with a nice hiway bridge. --  Ken 

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Posted by Capt. Grimek on Friday, April 21, 2017 8:41 PM

Yes, I should have been clearer... my mock up plan is to use two of these bridges as single lane (old) highway bridges. I used to have tha Atlas version and I thought perhaps placing styrene sheeting for the road surface atop the existing walkways or incresed width (these bridges would be 3 ft. away against the backdrop & 3D resin mt. range.  Think that's reasonable?

Thanks D Scmitt for the great pics! That traffic light is an excellent idea and should I not have the room for two adjacent bridges, that would fit the bill nicely!

Thanks SouthPenn for verifying that it's the same as the Atlas. (I thought it likely a European manufacturer made it originally.

Sheldon, me too! I grew up back East and remember the arched bridges and many single lane rural hiway bridges. I'm modeling WA State now, but this scene would be reminicent of the Columbia River Gorge's old state hiway (even though my layout is based in Black River WA/N. Cascades.

Kemac, yours was a two laner, I'm presuming?

Mr. Beasley you've done a beautiful job painting/weathering your bridge!

Jim

 

 

 

Raised on the Erie Lackawanna Mainline- Supt. of the Black River Transfer & Terminal R.R.

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Posted by SouthPenn on Friday, April 21, 2017 9:47 PM

I bought two of the old Atlas and combined them into a double track bridge. You could do that for a double lane road.

The squirrel that invaded our basement trashed my MTH bridges. Haven't repaired them yet.

South Penn
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Posted by KemacPrr on Sunday, April 23, 2017 3:23 PM

Yes all three bridges I used are two lane . One bridge has two end to end and the other is a single bridge. I painted them a nice pastel blue in one case and red in the other so they look like typical Pa. state hiway bridges. --  Ken 

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Posted by rrinker on Monday, April 24, 2017 10:07 AM

 Did you get some expanded metal flooring to put in there so they are REALLY lok typical PA highway bridges? I remember so many of those around my area, mostly pastel blue or green.

                           --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, April 24, 2017 5:58 PM

I see a pretty interesting project here.  Please keep us posted.

I would go the Full Monte on the traffic lights.  The ones that actually work are back in the Walthers catalog and on sale this month, along with the controllers.  If the roads approaching the bridges are visible, then animating the traffic lights will add a great effect.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by jlehnert on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 5:32 AM

DSchmitt

 

 
MisterBeasley
Inside the structure, edge-to-edge is only 2 1/4 inches.  It's only 1 3/8 between the walkways on the sides, where the track goes.  As I recall, the walkways are applied separately and could be omitted.  But, the top girders are a single piece, and to widen the bridge to highway size would require an entire new top section.

 

It could be a one lane road bridge with signs at each end to warn motorist. 

  

A traffic signal at each end to control occupancy would be an interesting sometimes used prototypical feature. 

 

Would be interesting if the tracks on the second bridge were still in use. The sign "Give Way" would take on a whole new meaning. 

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Posted by KemacPrr on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 10:59 PM

No just some -060 styrene to simulate a concrete roadway. That much photo etched would be too expensive for a three foot model !! I'm not that far from you Randy. Downingtown Pa. Same great PennDot bridges down here  !! 

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Posted by rrinker on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 7:32 AM

 Yes, actually I know EXACTLY where you are, I've driven past your place several times when I take the back way to our office which is just over by where the turnpike is. I keep meaning to come during the fall open house season and something always comes up.

                          --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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