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C&O L-1

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C&O L-1
Posted by cold steal on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 7:11 AM

Is on it's way. 

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Posted by cold steal on Friday, April 21, 2017 7:35 AM

eye candy, runs well and so far everything works!

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Posted by doctorwayne on Friday, April 21, 2017 3:19 PM

cold steal
eye candy...

Must be one of those "in the eye of the beholder" things. Whistling 
Not knowing a great deal about the C&O, I had to look it up...

...and there actually was a good-looking locomotive hidden under that disguise.

Wayne

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Friday, April 21, 2017 4:03 PM

Wayne, for those who like streamlined steam, pulling streamlined passenger trains, the L-1 was one of the best in my view.

It was one of those last attempts at steam excellence, one piece cast engine bed, all roller bearings, poppet valves, cross counter balanced drivers, etc.

Similar in modern features to the N&W J.

I have seen the one in the picture you posted many times, it is preserved here at the B&O museum.

Sheldon 

    

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Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, April 22, 2017 1:49 AM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
...I have seen the one in the picture you posted many times, it is preserved here at the B&O museum.

Yeah, that's where I took the photo, quite a few years ago.

My favourites for streamlined steam locomotives would probably be the Dreyfuss Hudsons, with the semi-streamlined CNR and GTW Northerns close behind.
Overall, though, I much prefer steam locomotives au natural.

Wayne

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Posted by pajrr on Saturday, April 22, 2017 5:18 AM

Have you ever seen the 490 as a 4-6-2 (as originally built before being made a 4-6-4 and streamlined?) I am sorry, but I am not a fan of smokebox front mounted air pumps on a passenger locomotive. The rebuilding did that locomotive a favor.

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, April 22, 2017 7:16 AM

doctorwayne

 

 
ATLANTIC CENTRAL
...I have seen the one in the picture you posted many times, it is preserved here at the B&O museum.

 

Yeah, that's where I took the photo, quite a few years ago.

My favourites for streamlined steam locomotives would probably be the Dreyfuss Hudsons, with the semi-streamlined CNR and GTW Northerns close behind.
Overall, though, I much prefer steam locomotives au natural.

Wayne

 

I understand. That loco is now indoors and in better condition than when you were there.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, April 22, 2017 7:20 AM

pajrr

Have you ever seen the 490 as a 4-6-2 (as originally built before being made a 4-6-4 and streamlined?) I am sorry, but I am not a fan of smokebox front mounted air pumps on a passenger locomotive. The rebuilding did that locomotive a favor.

 

Well again, to each their own. But the front mounted air pumps was a C&O trademark - passenger or freight.........

And, while they did use "parts" from the Pacifics to build the L-1's, they really were mostly new from the ground up. Even the parts reused were completely "refitted".

I often wonder if that stuff was done for tax and accounting reasons rather than any actual savings in cost. A rebuilt loco is a "repair", and new loco is a "capital expenditure"?

Sheldon

    

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Posted by cold steal on Saturday, April 22, 2017 9:15 AM

Anyway back to the model, I found the close couple mechanism between the tender and loco seemed to stick on my tighter curves causing derailments. So I took apart my 48hr. old tender to try a fix but all seemed well. Finally I noticed the platform on the loco to the tender was the culprit. Even with the mechanism it still would jam on curves. My fix is a balsa shim underneath the platform raising it up slightly thereby increasing clearance.  For anyone that gives a crap that is.

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, April 22, 2017 9:59 AM

cold steal

Anyway back to the model, I found the close couple mechanism between the tender and loco seemed to stick on my tighter curves causing derailments. So I took apart my 48hr. old tender to try a fix but all seemed well. Finally I noticed the platform on the loco to the tender was the culprit. Even with the mechanism it still would jam on curves. My fix is a balsa shim underneath the platform raising it up slightly thereby increasing clearance.  For anyone that gives a crap that is.

 

What radius curves are you running?

Sheldon

    

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Posted by cold steal on Saturday, April 22, 2017 12:18 PM

24r Atlas sectional is the tightest

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, April 22, 2017 3:16 PM

cold steal

24r Atlas sectional is the tightest

 

Well, that does seem a little sharp for a loco of that size/type.

As detail increases, so does minimum radius for reliable operation - no matter what manufacturers advertise.....

Sheldon

 

    

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Posted by yougottawanta on Saturday, April 22, 2017 3:19 PM

Who will be making the model ?

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, April 22, 2017 3:39 PM

yougottawanta

Who will be making the model ?

 

Broadway Limited

http://www.broadway-limited.com/candol-1.aspx

 

They are available now:

http://www.modeltrainstuff.com/product-p/bli-4552.htm

Regards, Ed

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Posted by BigDaddy on Saturday, April 22, 2017 3:42 PM

gmpullman
Broadway Limited

Are you sure YGW and the rest of that are authorized to know that information? Whisper

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by rrinker on Saturday, April 22, 2017 4:03 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
 
pajrr

Have you ever seen the 490 as a 4-6-2 (as originally built before being made a 4-6-4 and streamlined?) I am sorry, but I am not a fan of smokebox front mounted air pumps on a passenger locomotive. The rebuilding did that locomotive a favor.

 

 

 

Well again, to each their own. But the front mounted air pumps was a C&O trademark - passenger or freight.........

And, while they did use "parts" from the Pacifics to build the L-1's, they really were mostly new from the ground up. Even the parts reused were completely "refitted".

I often wonder if that stuff was done for tax and accounting reasons rather than any actual savings in cost. A rebuilt loco is a "repair", and new loco is a "capital expenditure"?

Sheldon

 

 This is similar to the Reading T1's. "Rebuilt" as 4-8-4's from I-10sa 2-8-0's. Redbuilt in name only - they have new cast engine beds. all got roller bearing lead and trailer trucks, and the last 10 got roller mains as well. The boiler from the I-10 was 'reused' but had a new middle section added to lengthen it plus a new smokebox.  All in all there wasn't a whole lot of the old loco recycled into the T1, but a plan to build all new locos was rejected by the WPB (they were designed and planned before the end of the war, and when the first one was built in 1945 there were still plenty of restrictions on materials), but the plan to 'rebuild' the old I-10's was approved. Not that this was nothing new for the Reading - before the war, 1927-1930,  they rebuilt 2-8-8-2's to 2-10-2's. Definitely some leftover parts with those.

                     --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, April 22, 2017 4:39 PM

BigDaddy
Are you sure YGW and the rest of that are authorized to know that information?

I'm pretty sure C&O and N&W were "Good Neighbors" Smile

An N&W J and one of these L-1s would make nice stable-mates!

Ed

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  • From: Nashville, TN area
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Posted by hardcoalcase on Sunday, April 23, 2017 1:22 PM

doctorwayne
Must be one of those "in the eye of the beholder" things.

Speaking of "eye of the beholder", the C&O L-1, in either version, is a shoo-in beauty queen compared to the Erie L-1; which only a "steam-punk" oriented camelback fan (who, me?) Geeked could love.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/GL276-BRASS-OVERLAND-OMI-1547-1-Erie-L-1-Angus-Type-0-8-8-0-2601-CAMELBACK-1920-/311841862038?hash=item489b393196:g:HtgAAOSwmgJY53be

Jim

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Posted by BigDaddy on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 7:13 PM

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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    December, 2011
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Posted by Uncle_Bob on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 10:34 PM

The pics from MBK look great, but not sure I'm willing to spend $700 for one when I'm not a C&O modeler.  Beautiful art deco engines, though.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, April 27, 2017 3:52 AM

Jim bought one and it's not even his era.  This is a better look at the model.  His has some jerkiness to it. 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by fmilhaupt on Thursday, April 27, 2017 5:38 AM

Union Station Products now makes side kits for a couple of the passenger cars that the L-1s were originally intended to pull.

The original plan was that the L-1s would pull trains that connected with the planned, but never implemented, Chessie streamliner. One set of these connecting trains would run from Ashland, Kentucky to Lexington. The other would run from Charlottesville, Virginia to Newport News.

The consist for each train was to be an L-1 pulling a Budd-built consist of a baggage-coach combine, two coach-lounges, and a lunch counter-diner-observation. When the Chessie plans were canceled, the L-1s and the cars purchased for the connecting trains were put into other service.

Following the big sell-off of the Chessie Budd cars in 1951, the C&O kept one combine and three of the lunch counter-diner-observations, which they used pretty much all over the system, right up until Amtrak day.

In the last year, Union Station Products has released side kits in HO, N, S and O scales for the Budd baggage-coach combine, and the lunch counter-diner-observation car. While these are cars C&O passenger train modelers can readily use for other trains from 1948-1971, they are two thirds of the cars you'd need to model the consists that the L-1s were intended to pull. These four-car trains are a neat "pike-sized" passenger train.

I suspect that it would not be difficult to get USP to produce the coach-lounge sides, now that there's a locomotive to pull them.

-Fritz Milhaupt, Publications Editor, Pere Marquette Historical Society, Inc.
http://www.pmhistsoc.org

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