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HO Alco C-415 . What company will finally take the plunge ?

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HO Alco C-415 . What company will finally take the plunge ?
Posted by dragonriversteel on Monday, March 20, 2017 6:57 PM

I've heard talk of two major HO manufacturer's making a C-415 available in 

HO . But talk is cheap. I asked the question to both Atlas and Bowser . Both of which responded with it's in the mix.

Personally I wanted this locomotive for thirty years. Now the HO high tech,high horsepower locomotives of today are great but I'm an old school Alco guy.

Anybody know insights into if this alco will materialize into a HO model ? When ?

 

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d5/Dragonriversteel/43rblight.jpg

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Posted by 7j43k on Monday, March 20, 2017 7:09 PM

Already been done.  I have three:  an SP&S, a BN and an undec.

Both of the former are great runners.  For the BN one, I added weight and a decoder.  It's pulled 25 cars out of a yard.  The undec is still in the box.

Lee English has told me that he put off the C-415 to get out the new RS-3's.  I expect he'll get to it after the RS-3's are out.  That may mean just the late phase ones; or, if his sales are stunning, he might feel the need to stay with the RS-3's other phases.  There is certainly more money in RS-3's than C-415's.

If Atlas said anything about doing one, it must have been a LONG time ago.  I surely haven't seen a hint about it for years.

 

Ed

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Posted by ATSFGuy on Monday, March 20, 2017 7:34 PM

Did we forget to release one in a specific road name?

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Posted by 7j43k on Monday, March 20, 2017 7:40 PM

ATSFGuy

Did we forget to release one in a specific road name?

 

 

"We"?

My recollection is that they were released in all the original owner schemes.  Except for the Australian.  And in BN, as I have one.  And Demonstrator.

 

Ed

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Posted by Bundy74 on Monday, March 20, 2017 8:52 PM

7j43k
My recollection is that they were released in all the original owner schemes.  Except for the Australian.  And in BN, as I have one.  And Demonstrator.

Who put them out?  I only know of the Mehano/IHC/Life-like model, and brass.

Modeling whatever I can make out of that stash of kits that takes up half my apartment's spare bedroom.

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Posted by 7j43k on Monday, March 20, 2017 8:55 PM

Overland Models did the painted ones.

The undec is a Key Models.

 

 

Ed

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Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 7:05 AM

 To do them in plastic, which one are you going to build? One of the 10 medium height cab Rock Island ones, one of the 10 high cap SP ones? The low cab one that Monongahela Connecting bought? Two high cabs with Hi-Ad truck that SP&S bought, that went to BN?

 It's such a rare loco, and it's been done. ATT did it too, way back when. Combine the small number total with the fact that nearly every railroad that did order one got different options, and you have a nightmare for making a production run in plastic that has the slightest chance of selling enough to justify the tooling cost.

                           --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by 7j43k on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 11:05 AM

The plastic C-415's that were done awhile ago were, and are, really awful.  I sold mine for $5.  I would STRONGLY recommend that anyone who just can't wait for a good one should find a brass one.  Unless, of course, you love model building.  But then, do one from scratch.

If/when the C-415 is done (again) in plastic, I expect it will be done in all variations.  Cutting molds these days appears to be practically free.  And, while there weren't very many made, they are quite striking.  And I think that will increase sales.  I also think a few branchline freelancers will get them.  Again for their striking looks.

I do hope that it comes as an undec kit with all the parts versions.  THAT would be fun to play with.

 

Ed

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Posted by LensCapOn on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 12:11 PM

Sounds like if you want a C-415 you need to get someone to do it in 3d printed form.

 

Hey, there's a C855 out there! (and more)

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Posted by Mark R. on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 4:42 PM

A pretty respectable C-415 can be made from the old AHM model if you are inclined enough to do some modelling ....

https://imageshack.com/a/tShC/1

Mark.

¡ uʍop ǝpısdn sı ǝɹnʇɐuƃıs ʎɯ 'dlǝɥ

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 5:29 PM

That is a great build.  I looked at his other stuff too.  Doesn't he post in here every once and while?

Maybe it was in the DDetailer forums.

Mike.

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Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 8:00 PM

'Striking' to some is 'ugly' to the rest - and I love Alcos, but those are just way too homely.

 I guess if Rapido can do the GMD-1, they could do C-415's. But there were over 100 GMD-1's built.

 Not sure what you mean that tooling costs are basically free - I don't know any professional tool and die maker who works for free. Let alone anyone who cuts injection molding dies. If you really want a couple of decent models your best bet may be to, as states, have someone draw up 3D printed parts, then make a molds and use those as masters for resin casting a bunch of each piece. Brass sheet underframe with a NWSL Stanton truck or a BullAnt drive and there you go. Only want 1 or 2? Just print out 2 and use the 3D printed ones as the end product. The only real hard part is finding someone with the skill to draw the parts to make the 3D printer files from. The small bits, like handrails and stanchions, are available from various detal parts makers, so you only need to 3D print what's going to be part of the shell, any detail parts can be seperately applied.

 Outside of finding a brass one and paying brass prices (compounded by the relative rarity of existing brass pieces), this is likely to be the fastest way to get one up to modern detail standards. I doubt anyone will make a production run in plastic.

                               --Randy

 

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by 7j43k on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 8:55 PM

rrinker

 Not sure what you mean that tooling costs are basically free - I don't know any professional tool and die maker who works for free. Let alone anyone who cuts injection molding dies. 

 

 

 

Back in the olden days, molds were cut by hand using a mix of a milling machine and tracing pantograph.

Now, once you have adequate drawings, you feed the info to the machine and it makes the molds while you sit and drink your coffee.  Or watch the other three machines.

So, having all those variations on a model don't cost any more than it used to cost for a single version.

That view is supported by the huge number of variations that are delivered to us at quite low prices, compared to if all the molds were hand cut.

 

Ed

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Posted by dragonriversteel on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 10:31 PM
Thank you all for your valuable insights. Hopefully some 3D printing guru will shell out (no pun intended) that wonderful little alco.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d5/Dragonriversteel/43rblight.jpg

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Posted by Paul3 on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 11:20 AM

Ed,
Cutting tooling is not "free", basically or otherwise.  A high-end car can cost up to $80,000 to tool.  That's not basically free.  Yes, you don't need a highly trained toolmaker to cut the tools these days because of CAM, but you do need a highly trained 3D CAD person to draw it in the first place.  And it's not as easy as just scanning a real item and hitting the "print" button.  The model needs to come out of the mold, which means someone with experience has to check to make sure the detail doesn't include any traps that would lock the plastic into the mold when it's shot.

What CAD/CAM has really done is allowed for many more detail parts.  In yon olden days, an Athearn loco shell might have 6 pieces: body, dynamic brake blister, cab, horn, cab windows and headlight lenses.  Today, a loco could have 100 parts or more.

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Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 12:25 PM

With the exception of the molded on grab irons and thick handrails, the AHM model isnt a bad starting point.  It even has see thru louvers.  I think the basic dimensions are decent enough.  Its a matter of adding details.

- Douglas

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