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Grades

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  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,230 posts
Grades
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 24, 2002 6:07 PM
How do you determine a 2% - 6% etc grade? I do not know the formula used.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 302,230 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 24, 2002 7:43 PM
The easiest way is to have a grade between 2% and 4%. Any more of a grade and some of your trains will have difficulty with the grade and the angle.

Here are some rough numbers on the grades.
All are based on a 9" piece of track.

2% Rises 3/16th" and requires 16 to go over another track.
3% Rises 1/4" and requires 12 sections to go over another track.
4% Rises 3/8" and requires 8 sections to go over another track.

Hope it helps and good luck,

Dave
  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: Guelph, Ont.
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Posted by BR60103 on Thursday, January 24, 2002 8:21 PM
The formula is the rise divided by the run.

A 1% grade rises 1" in 100" of track. (100 inches is just over 8 feet to give a reference point.)

I'm not sure if you measure the flat distance or along the grade; it won't matter unless you model Pikes Peak or Mt Washington Cog Rly where the grades are 37%.

David the Platelayer

--David

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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 24, 2002 9:00 PM
Thank you for the info.

Bob
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 24, 2002 9:02 PM
Thank you David.

Bob (the rookie)
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 24, 2002 9:12 PM
Hi David, Your formula is correct. Measure the the distance on the centerline of the track/roadbed. This way you don't have to make any adjustment for grades that are on curves..Vic
  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 25, 2002 6:06 PM
David,

The run is measured along the horizontal plane, not the grade. And you're right, the difference in measurement would be negligible in our applications.

Rog

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