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Wood trestle

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Wood trestle
Posted by Lillen on Sunday, January 13, 2008 4:42 PM

Hi everyone.

 

Once again I'm here with a question. Having seen a nice wood trestle in another thread I decided to finally go ahead and build one. Now, the emphasize is on BUILD. Basically i want to do as much as possible. So, if ordering from walthers, what would be a good supply of wood and what do I use to attach them. What glue is the best? Also, are their any complete kits that still need a loot of work. i would like this to be a centerpiece on my next layout and I want the pride of building it my self.

 

Magnus

Unless otherwise mentioned it's HO and about the 50's. Magnus
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Posted by Lillen on Sunday, January 13, 2008 4:43 PM

Also, do anyone know a source for plans on how to build one?

What radius is this http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/345-2016

 

 

Magnus

Unless otherwise mentioned it's HO and about the 50's. Magnus
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Posted by C&O Fan on Sunday, January 13, 2008 5:05 PM
 Lillen wrote:

Also, do anyone know a source for plans on how to build one?

What radius is this http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/345-2016

 

 

Magnus

According to their website it can be built to any radius even straight or S curved

http://www.jvmodels.biz/ho_scale_models.htm

 

TerryinTexas See My Layout Here Terry's C&O Layout*

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http://conewriversubdivision.yolasite.com/

 

 

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Posted by Lillen on Sunday, January 13, 2008 5:08 PM

Thanks for the link and the info. That's great, a lot of bridge and a lot of work for not that much money. Have anyone here tried building one? How much do you have to do your self?

 

Magnus

Unless otherwise mentioned it's HO and about the 50's. Magnus
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Posted by colvinbackshop on Sunday, January 13, 2008 11:11 PM

Magnus:

I built my "Long Bridge Trestle" completely from scratch, except for a jig for the spacing (which I purchased), a jig I made from a hard curing type of clay for consistency with assembly of the bents, a lot of strip-wood and glue!

I'll try to put together a "HOW" with a picture or two...But for the most part, it's all in your imagination unless you are trying to build a scale model of a prototype.

I'm sure I made a few mistakes and could have done a better job (bolt castings and the like) but OTOH it was a first attempt, its WAY back against the backdrop and it turned out pretty darn good.

Puffin' & Chuggin', JB Chief Engineer, Colvin Creek Railway
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Posted by loathar on Sunday, January 13, 2008 11:40 PM
One tip I was told is to pre stain all the wood. Stain doesn't like to stick to glue after it's assembled.
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Posted by C&O Fan on Monday, January 14, 2008 7:32 AM

 loathar wrote:
One tip I was told is to pre stain all the wood. Stain doesn't like to stick to glue after it's assembled.

Oh So True

I learned the hard way

Get your self a stain pen and prestain all the wood before you cut and glue

These are easy to use no muss no fuss when done just replace the cap !

Sold at all the DIY and hardware stores

 

TerryinTexas See My Layout Here Terry's C&O Layout*

See my Web Site Here

http://conewriversubdivision.yolasite.com/

 

 

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Posted by reklein on Monday, January 14, 2008 10:00 AM
Lillen, look up trestle articles by UK Guy for a wonderful trestle.
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Posted by mls1621 on Monday, January 14, 2008 11:10 AM

Magnus,

I built two trestles from scratch, just to see how they'd look, before I built one to actually put on a layout.

I model in N scale, but the principles are the same regardless of scale.

I made a drawing of the bent structure on a sheet of styrene, then laid a piece of the wood to be used for the pilings in place and used small styrene strips, glued down as guides.

Here are two templates I made, with the finished bent sections.

The holes you see in the template are there to prevent gluing the wood to the template, I discovered the need for the holes after my first attempt.  For glue, I used gap filling AC (Super glue). 

As mentioned in earlier posts, stain or paint the wood before construction to get a good finish.  It also helps seal the wood and prevents the AC from soaking into it.  When assembling, small amounts of glue work better than large amounts.  I tested the strength of one two bent section of the trestle.  It supported two ten pound test weights.  For your HO trestle, you could drill the bracing for insertion of Grandt Line bolts, to give it a more authenic appearance.  

A good source of information is Bridges & Trestles, Model Railroad Handbook No. 33, from Kalmbach.  It has everything you ever wanted to know about the subject and some things you might not.

Here is the doulble track trestle I built for my neighbor's N scale layout.

Micro Engineering makes flex track with the correct tie spacing with guard beams and guard rails for the trestle.  The track also comes with platforms and water barrels.  I didn't use these on the trestle I built, because there's no steam power on my neighbor's layout.

Here's a view taken from a slightly higher angle with no train on the trestle.

I hope this gives you some helpful ideas.

 

Mike St Louis N Scale UP in the 60's Turbines are so cool
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 14, 2008 11:32 AM

I used Basswood for my trestle.  I can't remember what size wood, but it was really easy to build.  Somebody mentioned the book "Bridges and Trestles".  I photocopied the plans from that book and then adjusted them to my height.  As long as you get your measurements right it should turn out nicely.  My trestle is straight, but with a little more work I don't think it would be too hard make a curved one.

Smitty 

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Posted by ARTHILL on Monday, January 14, 2008 11:50 AM

I scratch built mine - time consuming but easy. I bought Kalmbacks's bridge and trestle book and took dimensions from there. I made my own jig with sticks and a piece of plywood. I have a wood shop, so I cut my own lumber from an old walnut board. The color was wonderful as is. I glued it together with dark colored wood glue. I build it upside down on the work bench using a template I laid out on foam core. That kept the top even and level. The problem with kits is they are always the wrong size.

If you think you have it right, your standards are too low. my photos http://s12.photobucket.com/albums/a235/ARTHILL/ Art
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Posted by Lillen on Monday, January 14, 2008 12:02 PM

Thanks for all the advice. I checked out my library and found the Kalmbach book about trestles. As said here, it doesn't seem to hard to build one from scratch. Do anyone know if walthers carry appropriate wood and what wood that would be? I would also apreciate some dimensions that I ought to use.

 

There are some magnificent trestles in this thread. I checked out UKguys thread from a few years back and that one blew me away.

 

So what dimensions? If you have a link that would be perfect to avoind confusement.

 

Magnus

Unless otherwise mentioned it's HO and about the 50's. Magnus
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Posted by OzarkBelt on Monday, January 14, 2008 12:06 PM
I once built a small diorama  with a trestle from bamboo skewers. looked pretty good. Just a suggestion.Big Smile [:D]

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Posted by Lillen on Monday, January 14, 2008 12:10 PM

 OzarkBelt wrote:
I once built a small diorama  with a trestle from bamboo skewers. looked pretty good. Just a suggestion.Big Smile [:D]

 

Whats next, popsicle sticks! Big Smile [:D]

 

On a serious note, aren't they to weak?

 

Magnus

Unless otherwise mentioned it's HO and about the 50's. Magnus
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Posted by OzarkBelt on Monday, January 14, 2008 12:12 PM
 Lillen wrote:

 OzarkBelt wrote:
I once built a small diorama  with a trestle from bamboo skewers. looked pretty good. Just a suggestion.Big Smile [:D]

 

Whats next, popsicle sticks! Big Smile [:D]

 

On a serious note, aren't they to weak?

 

Magnus

I don't know, i didn't run anytrains on it...

though, i imagine it would have held because it was a scale 25' span. 

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose." - Jim Elliot Visit my blog! http://becomingawarriorpoet.blogspot.com

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Posted by Lillen on Monday, January 14, 2008 12:13 PM

How did it look? Did it look real?

 

Magnus

Unless otherwise mentioned it's HO and about the 50's. Magnus
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Posted by OzarkBelt on Monday, January 14, 2008 12:42 PM
 Lillen wrote:

How did it look? Did it look real?

 

Magnus

It didn't follow any specific prototype, but it looked pretty realistic. If i'd do it again i would stain before glueind and paint it a weathered gray. i'd also add a walkway (wooden coffee stirrers maybe?) and nut and bolt castings. (Don't have a pic unfortunatelySigh [sigh])

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose." - Jim Elliot Visit my blog! http://becomingawarriorpoet.blogspot.com

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Posted by OzarkBelt on Monday, January 14, 2008 12:43 PM
 Lillen wrote:

How did it look? Did it look real?

 

Magnus

It didn't follow any specific prototype, but it looked pretty realistic. If i'd do it again i would stain before glueind and paint it a weathered gray. i'd also add a walkway (wooden coffee stirrers maybe?) and nut and bolt castings. (Don't have a pic unfortunatelySigh [sigh])

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose." - Jim Elliot Visit my blog! http://becomingawarriorpoet.blogspot.com

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Posted by ARTHILL on Monday, January 14, 2008 1:10 PM
 Lillen wrote:

So what dimensions? If you have a link that would be perfect to avoind confusement.

Magnus

If you are following the trestle book, each set of plans will tell you what dimension lumber you will need for that style. I got all my numbers from the drawings in the book. If you want perfect accuracy, you need to get them all. I only used about 4 different sizes. Here is a site with nice stuff, though I have not tried thier strip wood. http://www.rustystumps.com/

If you think you have it right, your standards are too low. my photos http://s12.photobucket.com/albums/a235/ARTHILL/ Art
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Posted by reklein on Monday, January 14, 2008 5:32 PM
Lillen check the company MIDWEST for dimensioned basswood.You can get wood around 1/8" square  by the bundle. That translates to a little less than a foot in HO. The walnut Art is using is perfect in color,no stain needed but hard to come by or expensive. I think Midwest handles that too.
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Posted by Lillen on Tuesday, January 15, 2008 5:02 AM

 reklein wrote:
Lillen check the company MIDWEST for dimensioned basswood.You can get wood around 1/8" square  by the bundle. That translates to a little less than a foot in HO. The walnut Art is using is perfect in color,no stain needed but hard to come by or expensive. I think Midwest handles that too.

 

Thanks, I checked it out. Here is the result: http://www.walthers.com/exec/search?category=&scale=&manu=midwest&item=&keywords=lumber&instock=Q&split=30&Submit=Search

 

If you would choose a few samples, say four different kinds, which ones would that be? Which one should I use as the main?

 

Would these be good:

472-8029Architectural Scale Lumber -- .125 x .125 x 11" pkg(12)

 

Magnus

Unless otherwise mentioned it's HO and about the 50's. Magnus
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Posted by OzarkBelt on Tuesday, January 15, 2008 7:54 AM
psst... wooden dowels @ wal-mart or wooden skewers or coffee stirrers (wooden)Whistling [:-^]

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Posted by reklein on Tuesday, January 15, 2008 9:56 AM

The .125x.125 stock is good. Also keep in mind you'll need stock for the members that run lengthwise just under the ties,I forgot what they're called, but they're much heavier maybe 5/32x1/4". You may also want tie material or else order a length or two of Model Engineering bridge flex track. Nice stuff.Here's a pic.

I used dowel here as the bents (trestle frames) are driven piling.

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Posted by tatans on Tuesday, January 15, 2008 10:58 AM
 Lillen wrote:

 OzarkBelt wrote:
I once built a small diorama  with a trestle from bamboo skewers. looked pretty good. Just a suggestion.Big Smile [:D]

 

Whats next, popsicle sticks! Big Smile [:D]

 

On a serious note, aren't they too weak?

Bamboo is one of the hardest wood there is--it's 5 x stronger than red oak (bamboo is really grass) 

Magnus

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Posted by Packer on Tuesday, January 15, 2008 5:58 PM

I built one, but it ain't all that great.


From above:

No one made a curved bridge, so I built this. A 9" straight won't fit. (If i build a module for my engine service facility, I might)

Vincent

Wants: 1. high-quality, sound equipped, SD40-2s, C636s, C30-7s, and F-units in BN. As for ones that don't cost an arm and a leg, that's out of the question....

2. An end to the limited-production and other crap that makes models harder to get and more expensive.

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Posted by Lillen on Wednesday, January 16, 2008 10:14 AM

Well I bought some stuff today. A couple of 120 cm long pieces of wood, some barbecue sticks and matches with out the sulfur thingy. I will try my hand at this. It won't be perfect but I willl learn. My bigest concern is that the main timbers will be to big, the smallest dimension I could find was 8mm*15mm but that will have to do. What ever I learn will be worth the somewhat small cost.

 I will post a picture as soon as I get something done.

 

Magnus

 

Unless otherwise mentioned it's HO and about the 50's. Magnus
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Posted by OzarkBelt on Wednesday, January 16, 2008 10:48 AM
good for you. looking forward to seeing your pics. hope our suggestions were/are helpful.

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose." - Jim Elliot Visit my blog! http://becomingawarriorpoet.blogspot.com

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Posted by Lillen on Wednesday, January 16, 2008 11:19 AM

 OzarkBelt wrote:
good for you. looking forward to seeing your pics. hope our suggestions were/are helpful.

 

You where all very helpful. You have inspired me and given me valuable advice. Thank you all of you.

 

Magnus

Unless otherwise mentioned it's HO and about the 50's. Magnus

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