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Switching from DCC to DC

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Posted by John-NYBW on Sunday, February 23, 2020 1:29 PM

davidmurray

To the orginal poster:

Would it be possible to have a secion of track, twice the length of a Loco that is gaped and never powered.  Back cars into this section, pull away, back other engine in from the other end, couple and pull away?

No power, no bridging possible.

 

 

I don't think that will work. The logging branch has several switch backs and will take its loads to the interchange yard. It will end up doing a runaround as will the loco making the pickups and setouts. Having a dead section of track would be too limiting.

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Posted by gregc on Sunday, February 23, 2020 4:57 AM

i use an NCE PowerCab which plugs into an 6 conductor RJ-12 jack which provide power (~13V) to the PowerCab and track connections.

when i play with a DC locomotive, i plug a simple PWM throttle into the jack.  i disable analog mode, CV 29 bit 2 on my DCC locomotives

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by BRAKIE on Sunday, February 23, 2020 4:32 AM

I used my MRC Tech 6 on my last ISL..The new one will be DC only and my power will be either my Controll Master 2 or my CM20.

Larry

Conductor.

Summerset Ry.


"Your first mistake may be your last!" Safety First!

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, February 23, 2020 12:06 AM

I am going to suggest you use a 4PDT toggle. These can be found on eBay for about 10.00.

Wire a DPDT section of the switch so that it switches the transition track.

Then, isloate a 12" section of track on either side of the transition track and wire each with one rail through a section of the 4PDT switch so when the transition track is DCC, the DC section is unpowered, and when the transition track is DC, the DCC section leading to it is unpowered.

This will add an extra layer of safety for you.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by snjroy on Saturday, February 22, 2020 11:15 PM

I installed decoders in two of these engines. The most complicated part is removing the body (there is a hidden screw under the water cap in the back). No need to change the motor - just make sure the decoder is rated at 1 amp stall. You won't regret it - it will give you way more flexibility on the layout if both sections are connected.

Simon

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Posted by davidmurray on Saturday, February 22, 2020 8:36 PM

To the orginal poster:

Would it be possible to have a secion of track, twice the length of a Loco that is gaped and never powered.  Back cars into this section, pull away, back other engine in from the other end, couple and pull away?

No power, no bridging possible.

 

David Murray from Oshawa, Ontario Canada
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Posted by mbinsewi on Saturday, February 22, 2020 8:05 PM

I do agree with Ed, he has many tracks, and trains on the layout at once.  Any thing could happen. 

I'm like the OP, just me running trains, and I can run both, but never at the same time, and 2 engines with trains on the layout at once is rare.  I might run a continous main line train, while switching with another, but that is a rare occasion.

Thank you Mel, for showing a way that those of do this, can add some saftey and isolation to what we do.

I like the OP's idea, with his ops., but I haven't looked, as Ed has, as to the install of a decoder in the OP's loco.

I use DC for my complete main line, to test locos for DCC conversions.  Test over, DC unpluged, disconected from the track, and DCC back on.

Mike.

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Posted by RR_Mel on Saturday, February 22, 2020 7:36 PM

gmpullman

 

 

I've heard yet more horror stories of "bridging the gap" both with programming tracks and/or DC/DCC combined sections. You really need to have an isolated section as long as the locomotive and be sure of the [electrical] switch settings before crossing over the isolated section.

IMHO, not worth the risk. Get a decoder.

Good Luck, Ed

 

I agree with Ed "bridging the gap" so I drew up a simple fix for someone that would like to do what the OP ask to do.
 
By using a 4PDT toggle one can easily install an isolated section of track to prevent a mishap by an engine crossing a gap between the DC and the DCC operations.
 
Click to enlarge
 
The Isolated section could be the length of a locomotive and protect both systems.  The Isolated section would be dead (no power) in the DC position.
 
 
 
Mel
 
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, February 22, 2020 5:19 PM

mbinsewi
If a DCC loco happens to jump any gaps, the decoder is history.

richg1998
One time someone crossed and we were all gabbing. Smoked the NCE Power Pro Booster.

 

Installing a decoder in the Heistler doesn't look all that complicated — I believe that would be your best option!

 

Three truck:

https://tcsdcc.com/installation/ho-scale/1467

Two truck:

https://tcsdcc.com/installation/ho-scale/1465

I've heard yet more horror stories of "bridging the gap" both with programming tracks and/or DC/DCC combined sections. You really need to have an isolated section as long as the locomotive and be sure of the [electrical] switch settings before crossing over the isolated section.

IMHO, not worth the risk. Get a decoder.

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by richg1998 on Saturday, February 22, 2020 3:50 PM

Our club use to run only DC for some years.

When we went to DCC, we tried some blocks in DC and some in DCC. Our DC hand made throttles were good for about 2.5 amps. We use to double or triple diesels.

One time someone crossed and we were all gabbing. Smoked the NCE Power Pro Booster. After that, DC at home.

You may never run ionto this at home.

Rich

If you ever fall over in public, pick yourself up and say “sorry it’s been a while since I inhabited a body.” And just walk away.

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Posted by floridaflyer on Saturday, February 22, 2020 12:55 PM

Second Mel's suggestion for a center off DPDT, insures that section is dead until you make a decision which one you want. Other wise the section is always live in one mode or the other and that could cause problems

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Posted by RR_Mel on Saturday, February 22, 2020 11:52 AM

I would suggest using a DPDT with center off just to remind you which mode you are using. 
 
I also run dual mode.
 
 
Mel
 
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by mbinsewi on Saturday, February 22, 2020 11:16 AM

I can run my layout on DC or DCC.  I use the Atlas switches, but I think your DPDT switch is a better way to do it.

Just make sure one is completely off when running the other.  If a DCC loco happens to jump any gaps, the decoder is history.

Mike.

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Switching from DCC to DC
Posted by John-NYBW on Saturday, February 22, 2020 11:11 AM

I have a logging branch on my DCC layout that I am getting ready to make operational. I got a DC Rivarossi Heisler many years ago for the purpose of working this branch. This Heisler will be the only loco working the branch so the thought hit me that it would probably be cheaper if I just wired the branch to run DC rather than buy and install a decoder in the Heisler. I would have to have an interchange section of the layout that could operate in DC or DCC mode. My thought is to have a switch that would flip the bus line on that section between the two different power sources. Since I am a lone wolf operator, at no time would I need to be running both DC and DCC locos in this interchange section simultaneously. I'm not the sharpest guy when it comes to electronics but it seems to me this would work. Does anybody see a downside to this? Would a double pole/double throw switch be what I would want for this?

From a previous layout I have a DC power pack and a tethered throttle that is long enough to reach both ends of the logging branch so I wouldn't need to invest in those. 

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