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Determining motor voltage

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  • Member since
    December, 2014
  • 129 posts
Determining motor voltage
Posted by Wolf359 on Friday, September 13, 2019 4:25 PM

I have several can motors that I found in a plastic box in my garage, but I don't know their voltage. Is there a safe and simple way to determine what voltage these motors are without frying them or myself? If so, can it be done with an analog multimeter, as I own one? Two of them are made by Mabuchi, but none have any voltage ratings on them.

Thank you in advance for any and all tips.

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • 4,005 posts
Posted by RR_Mel on Friday, September 13, 2019 4:45 PM

The small can motors are made to run starting at as low as 1½ volt and up.  The better 12 volt motors will measure from 20Ω to 30Ω across the windings.  If so try them on 12 volts.   
 
 
 
Mel
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
  • Member since
    July, 2007
  • From: Yorkton, Sask , Canada
  • 207 posts
Posted by wvg_ca on Friday, September 13, 2019 6:34 PM

if you have a variable power supply, or an old transformer ... you can start at maybe  couple of volts and slowly work your way up .

 

you can also probably look them up on the 'net to find out voltage range ...

  • Member since
    October, 2006
  • From: Western, MA
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Posted by richg1998 on Sunday, September 15, 2019 10:09 AM

Some years ago I Googled the name and motor number and found the specs.

Rich

If you ever fall over in public, pick yourself up and say “sorry it’s been a while since I inhabited a body.” And just walk away.

  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Vancouver Island, BC
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Posted by selector on Sunday, September 15, 2019 11:31 AM

Since these are presumed to be DC motors, they'll take infinitely variable voltage up to their limit, at which they may also limit out on amperage...and that's the problem.  If they are being required to do work at the same time, they'll begin to take up amperage commensurate with voltage, and they'll begin to get warmer, and warmer...and...

I like the last suggestion; if there's a name and model, do a www search and see if anything pops up, or simply contact the manufacturer.

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