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what solder to use to extend wires running to rails

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what solder to use to extend wires running to rails
Posted by pugdogg55 on Monday, July 22, 2019 9:51 PM

I am getting and NCE power cab for my starter dcc system. The type of track i am using is bachmann EZ track (I plan to replace it in the future but it's what I have currently). To connect power to the rails it had a plug that plugs into a rerailer section of track. I plan to get a spare power cord that fits the EZ track, cut it off, and solder the power wires from the dcc system to the plug. From googling around, I think this should work (please tell me if this is not the best way of going about this).

My question is which solder should I use to connect the wires? I have 63/37 rosin core solder that I used to hook a speaker up to my decoder. Will this do or is there a better kind I shouold get?

Bonus quick question: Also from googling, i don't think it matters which wire gets soldered to the adjoining wire on the plug for dcc (I think it does for dc though). If it does matter, is there a good way to tell which wire goes to which?

 

thanks for any answers

Tags: DCC , Wiring
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Posted by carl425 on Monday, July 22, 2019 10:44 PM

pugdogg55
I have 63/37 rosin core solder that I used to hook a speaker up to my decoder. Will this do or is there a better kind I shouold get?

That'll work fine.

I have the right to remain silent.  By posting here I have given up that right and accept that anything I say can and will be used as evidence to critique me.

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Posted by betamax on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 5:02 AM

pugdogg55

My question is which solder should I use to connect the wires? I have 63/37 rosin core solder that I used to hook a speaker up to my decoder. Will this do or is there a better kind I shouold get?

Bonus quick question: Also from googling, i don't think it matters which wire gets soldered to the adjoining wire on the plug for dcc (I think it does for dc though). If it does matter, is there a good way to tell which wire goes to which?

 

 

Your choice of solder is fine.  Consider adding a little additional rosin flux to the joint before soldering, it will make the task easier.

Note: ROSIN, not acid flux!

https://dccwiki.com/Soldering

As to which wire goes where, it matters.  Get the phasing wrong and you have a short. 

https://dccwiki.com/Wiring_for_Digital_Command_Control

The easiest way to avoid confusion is to use a defined colour code.  All the red wires go to rail A, black to rail B. You can take a boxcar and mark the roof with an A on one side and the B one the other, so as you move it down the track it indicates which wire goes where.

 

Tags: DCC
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Posted by BroadwayLion on Saturday, July 27, 2019 10:08 AM

Soldering Rules

 

1) LOOK at the soldering Iron BEFORE picking it up.

2) Adjust eyeglasses before picking up soldering iron.

3) Do not solder overhead. It will drip down and mar your nice soft fur.

4) The green world thinks you should use a non-lead solder. Ignore them. Lead content is best for electronic work. Use the funny green stuf on your pipes.

 

ROAR

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Posted by wvg_ca on Saturday, July 27, 2019 11:58 AM

63/37 is actually one of the better choices ...

as one of the other posters mentioned, maybe add a bit of rosin flux ..

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, July 27, 2019 6:08 PM

wvg_ca
63/37 is actually one of the better choices ...

.

That is what I have been using... great stuff. Mine is 0.032" in diameter with a rosin core and I get excellent results with the Weller soldering station set on 500 degrees.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by betamax on Sunday, July 28, 2019 6:55 AM

What are the two most common reasons for decoder failures?

Incorrect flux.  Some manufacuturers do not recommend using flux, because no flux is better than the wrong flux.  Acid flux not only eats at the connections, but can form a conductive bridge between connections. Many popular fluxes recommended in the model railroad world are corrosive, without the user knowing that. 

The second cause is ESD.  Your soldering iron can be destroying things without you realising it is happening. Improper handling can also damage or destroy a decoder.

https://dccwiki.com/ESD 

ESD is insidious in its methods.  For all those who say they have "never had a problem", well, it is lurking in the background waiting to happen.

 

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Posted by BroadwayLion on Sunday, July 28, 2019 7:32 PM

Yes... The tip of your soldering iron needs to be grounded. You may not get that with the cheap ones.

 

ROAR

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Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

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Posted by richg1998 on Sunday, July 28, 2019 8:38 PM

I have been using Cardas Quad EUtectic Solder for many years with a touch of Rosin flux. Best solder ever. Amazon sells it.

I use to do a lot of PC board electronic projects.

Cannot solder anymore because of poor eyesight.

Rich

If you ever fall over in public, pick yourself up and say “sorry it’s been a while since I inhabited a body.” And just walk away.

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Posted by rrinker on Monday, July 29, 2019 2:13 PM

 I refuse to be stopped - even with a magnifier or an Optivisor, I just can't solder (small things) at arm's length. I solder literally inches from my nose.

63/37 is the best choice. Been posted many times, just look up what 'eutectic' means and it's pretty easy to see why a eutectic solder blend is much easier to use than a non-eutectic solder like 60/40. 

I have yet to destroy anything through ESD, and I build all my own computers, too, not just install decoders adn solder other electronics. When it comes to workign with computers, I try to avoid things liek shuffling my feet on the carpet, and I touch metal before touching the motherboard or CPU or add in cards. These days, I do have a grounded (through a 1 Meg resistor - NEVER connect a wrist strap or static mat directly to ground!) anti-stat mat on my workbench, and it does have a connection for a wrist strap that I never use. My soldering station is ESD-safe. The little 15 watt iron from Radio Shack I used for decoders and small components before I got the solderign station was grounded and had a 3 prong plug. None of the others did, they were all just 2 prong plugs.

 My first computer was a kit I built when I was 12 or so. I didn't fully understand ESD back then, and this computer was all CMOS ICs, even the CPU. It was all socketed, so the only thign I soldered were passives and IC sockets, no actual ICs, but when it came to inserting the chips in theor sockets - I had no ESD equipment, no wrist strap or anything. It worked fine - and somethign I have seen people say is that "sure, it's fine now, but you shortened the life of the components" - well, nearly 40 years old and it still works fine! I should probably repalce the electrolytic capacitors in it, but it actually runs just liek it did all those years ago.

 I'm not saying you CAN'T damage chips with ESD - but except for some specific types of components not commonly used in model railroading, I think the danger is greatly overblown. Or maybe I'm a poor static generator - although I get some nasty zaps in winter when reaching for a doorknob. Components installed in circuits are even less likely to be damaged, its the bare ICs themselves that are most vulnerable. So don;t go out of your way to make yourself as statically charged as possible, but also don't be overly paranoid. Touch metal or somethign grounded periodically and that should be plenty of precaution.

                              --Randy

 


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Posted by Rae45 on Thursday, September 19, 2019 4:52 PM

I want to do the same thing you are doing but know very little about wiring or soldering. I also have an NCE power cab and want to connect to ez track. Can you tell me what to connect to what in making the conversion from the Bachmann controller which I have used for test running? If you know of any book or YouTube video that would help I would much appreciate it.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Friday, September 20, 2019 11:26 AM

This thread should help  

http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/744/t/238891.aspx

Welcome to the forum.  Your posts will be moderated for a bit, so expect a delay. 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by pugdogg55 on Friday, September 20, 2019 11:01 PM

I actually didn't need to solder at all. You simply need to take the power cable and snip free the end that doesn't plug into the EZ track. split the wires and strip maybe 1/4 inch of the casing off and connect that into the track terminals as the NCE manual shows. If you have more questions or want pictures, I could provide some, just let me know

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