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Electronicals drive me NUTZ !

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  • Member since
    April, 2015
  • 16 posts
Electronicals drive me NUTZ !
Posted by Riley B on Friday, March 23, 2018 8:35 PM

I installed a QSI Quantum Titan-A sound decoder I have had for some time.I tried it out on my DC test track and it sounded great.Then I got adventurous and tried the reverse switch under power like some of my other sound decoders,to operate a horn or whistle.Turns out that was not a good idea,it just stopped dead.The instruction manual indicates one end of a resistor as a "momentary jumper to RESET decoder".That is all the information provided.I am sure it needs to connect to something else,but I don't know to what.Electronicals drive me nutz ! Thank you for your help!!

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: North Dakota
  • 7,803 posts
Posted by BroadwayLion on Saturday, March 24, 2018 9:48 AM

Your first four words lost our poor little lion.

 

LION runs R-68 type cars on a 600v DC third rail with no problems at all.

Now all him gotta do is catch the train of him.

 

ROAR

 

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Ontario Canada
  • 3,158 posts
Posted by Mark R. on Saturday, March 24, 2018 3:27 PM

And there we have the usual helpful words of wisdom from lion ....

Him don't know nuthin' 'bout DCC, but him always have something to say.

Mark.

¡ uʍop ǝpısdn sı ǝɹnʇɐuƃıs ʎɯ 'dlǝɥ

  • Member since
    August, 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
  • 6,767 posts
Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, March 24, 2018 11:54 PM

Riley B
The instruction manual indicates one end of a resistor as a "momentary jumper to RESET decoder"

Hi,

I have a Titan that I bought several years ago and have not begun to install it so I really can't give first-hand information. I used to do the same thing with my old Broadway Limited, QSI locomotives when running on DC by quickly flipping the direction switch but I never had one "freeze"

So, I just found the twelve page instruction sheets. It does not mention a resistor for reset. It says to use pins 13 and 14 from P2, that would be the pink wire and the black with white stripe wire.

Turn off power, jumper P2-13 and P2-14. Turn on power and the decoder will speak "reset". Then remove jumper from P2-13/14.

The sheet also warns that the 14 pin plutg that connects to P2 is very sensitive to proper engagement and if you lose sounds or functions this is a likely cause.

[EDIT]

I messed up. My QSI decoder is a Titan-U. From what I gather the Titan A has either the reed switch or a pin-selected jumper for reset using DC power.

Page 40 here:  http://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/0f7119_a924b5f2abc140df8194e336e423bbc5.pdf

If you have DCC access the reset can be done by reset the decoder to default by entering the following CVs in the order shown below.

1. CV 49 = 128

2. CV 50 = 255

3. CV 56 = 113

The decoder will speak the word “RESET” when the last CV is entered (if done on the mainline) OR when power is next applied (if done on the program track.)

 

 Another possibility is that your QSI went into its half-shutdown mode or full-shutdown mode.

Hope that helps, Ed

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 6,366 posts
Posted by Overmod on Sunday, March 25, 2018 2:55 PM

You'd use a resistor for the same reason you'd use one instead of, say, a screwdriver to discharge a very large capacitor.  Provides control over peak current.

Some of the large capacitors used for ripple smoothing in 2 to 3hp DC motors may have something like 161V across them shortly after operation, and this can easily be lethal if inadvertently discharged via the wrong path through the body.  It will also put spots before your eyes and nasty weld spots on your screwdriver if discharged that way.  But some manufacturers actually provide a couple of megohms permanently shorted across these cap terminals, so the charge bleeds down gradually -- and these are not power-rated resistors.

I always used a resistor rather than a shorting or configuration jumper to reset things like CMOS on computer boards, mostly out of paranoia.

  • Member since
    April, 2015
  • 16 posts
Posted by Riley B on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 5:06 PM

I finally figured it out,it even stumped the guys at the club house.Thank you all for your input.

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