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Good time delay push button switch

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PED
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Good time delay push button switch
Posted by PED on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 10:38 AM

I need some  time delay pushbutton switches on my layout. I find sutable switches on ebay for cheap ($3.75) from Hong Kong. I see same switches on sites like Amazon for $22 and more. My concern is how reliable they might be. I saw reviews on similar switches saying they were DOA or failed soon after installation. Anyone here used similar switches? How long did they last? 

If these Hong Kong switches are doomed to failure, can anyone suggest a switch that would be more reliable?

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 2:21 PM

PED
If these Hong Kong switches are doomed to failure, can anyone suggest a switch that would be more reliable?

This sounds like a good application for using Arduino. You may have to do some experimenting to get your final results but for time delay you would be able to customize it for your particular application.

Google "arduino timer pushbutton" and go from there.

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 2:39 PM

You can build one for yourself on the cheap if you have resistors, capacitors, and a transistor or two.  Parts are commonly available on amazon.  <<$10.00 and no programming necessary.

https://www.eleccircuit.com/off-on-after-delay-switch-by-mosfet/

https://www.homemade-circuits.com/simple-delay-timer-circuits-explained/

The secret is in the capacitor.  The larger the cap, the longer it takes for the current to pass through the transistor.  You can also use a zener diode on the base leg of the transistor to go from a more traditional pure on/off state.

 

Don - Specializing in layout DC->DCC conversions

Modeling C&O transition era and steel industries There's Nothing Like Big Steam!

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Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 3:03 PM

 A little bit more consistent one can be made with a 555 timer IC - dime a dozen. See Rob Paisley's circuits page http://circuitous.ca/LM555.html#4

Circuit 5 is of the type "push the button, it turns on for a set tiem then shuts off" circuit. Dependong on what you are powering, you may be able to hook it right to the 555. Or you could have the 555 trigger a relay to drive a larger load.

                                    --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 9:13 AM

rrinker

 A little bit more consistent one can be made with a 555 timer IC - dime a dozen. See Rob Paisley's circuits page http://circuitous.ca/LM555.html#4

Circuit 5 is of the type "push the button, it turns on for a set tiem then shuts off" circuit. Dependong on what you are powering, you may be able to hook it right to the 555. Or you could have the 555 trigger a relay to drive a larger load.

                                    --Randy

 

 


Oh good call.  Totally forgot about that little gem of an IC.

Don - Specializing in layout DC->DCC conversions

Modeling C&O transition era and steel industries There's Nothing Like Big Steam!

PED
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Posted by PED on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 11:07 AM

Thanks but I am not interested in building my own. Too many other higher priority items for my time. After looking at the timers I saw, I realized that they will not work anyway. I want a timer where I can press a button and turn current on to my load for a few seconds then when the time is complete, the circuit turns off and the timer will reset so I can do it again later without me needing to reset the time circuit. Everything I have found so far will initiate the circuit for a set period of time but will not reset the timer unless the power is removed from the circuit.

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Posted by rrinker on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 1:36 PM

 The 555 ones most definitely does not need power cycled. Push button, circuit turns on for set number of seconds, then turns off. Press button again, repeat the process. Hold the button - it still turns off after the time expires, then you have to release and press the button to start another cycle. Perhaps you can find someone to put a couple together for you? Component cost is minimal.

 There is a commercial pre-built version. The Circuitron TD-1. Push button, relay turns on for a period of up to 1 minute, then turns off. Push button again to repeat. No need to cycle power. A bit salty at $34.95 list though. Buying name brand components, no who knows what Chinese stuff from eBay the circuit used about $5 worth of parts.

                                  --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by Gaucho on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 1:37 PM
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Posted by rrinker on Thursday, February 15, 2018 1:18 PM

 That appears to be another one of those where you have to remove power to start a new cycle, and power has to be applied continuously for the cycle to complete. Based on the description, it's the sort of thing you would use where you turn on circuit A, and then after a specified delay, circuit B turns on.

                           --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

PED
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Posted by PED on Saturday, February 17, 2018 8:34 AM

Here is the one I was looking at but I cannot tell for sure if it needs to cycle the power to restart the timer. I suspect it does thus would not work like I want. It is cheap but would probably need to buy some extrax to cover the ones that fail.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1pc-DC-12V-Timing-Timer-Delay-Turn-OFF-Switch-Relay-Module-1-10s-Adjustable-gf/152624700302?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649

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Posted by rrinker on Saturday, February 17, 2018 10:26 AM

 From the description it appears that would be one that would work as desired. Press button, relay clicks, closing one set of contacts, then after a set delay the relay clicks off and opens the contacts. 

                                  --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

PED
  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • 111 posts
Posted by PED on Saturday, February 17, 2018 3:57 PM

rrinker

 From the description it appears that would be one that would work as desired. Press button, relay clicks, closing one set of contacts, then after a set delay the relay clicks off and opens the contacts. 

                                  --Randy

 

 

Correct but it appears that the power is supplied all the time and may not have a power break to reset the timer. The price is cheap enough so I am going ahead and order several and see what they do. 

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Posted by rrinker on Saturday, February 17, 2018 6:43 PM

 Yes, power is applied to the timer circuit all the time. You don't interrupt it as part of the cycle at all. The power for the item you want to operate has to be run through the relay terminals, where the relay contacts repalce either a toggle switch which would turn the device on continuously, or a pushbutton that would have turned it on only as long as you held the button. Power for the timer circuit and power for the thing being controlled with a time delay are two different things here.

                                   --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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