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What to check - Intermitant Short

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  • Member since
    January, 2014
  • From: Cresskill, NJ USA
  • 909 posts
What to check - Intermitant Short
Posted by gdelmoro on Thursday, January 11, 2018 10:19 AM

I hate these problems! Super Angry

DCC Layout, 3 EB1 CB's segrating the 2 Main Lines, Sorting Yard and Ferry Yard.

From time to time (without any understandable reason) the MainLine CB trips and stays shorted until I turn the layout off and wait a while then it all comes back.

It first occurred last week while runing three trains. Two on one Mainline and one on the other. No matter what I did it remained shorted. I ended up removing all the locomotives and rolling stock yet the short remained.

I shut down the System and visually checked the tracks. Nothing!

Turned it back on - ALL OK

A while later running one train on one of the mainline tracks a short occured and the mainline breaker tripped. Other two still working.

Shut off the system, waited about a minute and turned it back on. All working.

Any ideas?

Gary

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 24,171 posts
Posted by rrinker on Thursday, January 11, 2018 10:36 AM

 Next time it happens, as a first step (unless there's obviously a loco derailed), try just turning the whole layout off then back on. If that clears it, I bet you have a flakey EB1. That it did not clear itself even after removing all trains from the track (so it's not one of the locos shorting, or an outright overload) yet immediately cleared up by cycling power makes me think the EB1 itself is to blame here.

                                           --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 17,122 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:02 AM

rrinker

 Next time it happens, as a first step (unless there's obviously a loco derailed), try just turning the whole layout off then back on. If that clears it, I bet you have a flakey EB1. That it did not clear itself even after removing all trains from the track (so it's not one of the locos shorting, or an outright overload) yet immediately cleared up by cycling power makes me think the EB1 itself is to blame here.

                                           --Randy 

Or, the trip current adjustment on the EB1 needs to be set differently.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    December, 2017
  • From: Buffalo, NY
  • 82 posts
Posted by Lonehawk on Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:38 AM

rrinker

 Next time it happens, as a first step (unless there's obviously a loco derailed), try just turning the whole layout off then back on. If that clears it, I bet you have a flakey EB1. That it did not clear itself even after removing all trains from the track (so it's not one of the locos shorting, or an outright overload) yet immediately cleared up by cycling power makes me think the EB1 itself is to blame here.

                                           --Randy

 

 

Ah, the universal electrical troubleshooting move.  Scary thing is, it usually works, and for a LOT of things.

- Adam


When all else fails, wing it!

  • Member since
    January, 2014
  • From: Cresskill, NJ USA
  • 909 posts
Posted by gdelmoro on Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:41 AM

I need to check but I think the trip current is set to 3.5 amps.

I did do the turn off and on thing the first time it happened but it stayed shorted. Maybe it was too short between the on off.  I'll give it another try.

I'm guessing since I posted this now, it wont happen again.  Confused

Gary

  • Member since
    November, 2013
  • 509 posts
Posted by snjroy on Thursday, January 11, 2018 12:28 PM

Hi. I hate these problems too (!).  I don't have that system but I would definitely make sure that the problem is not associated (caused) with a specific locomotive or car. So I would run each of my locos individually and see what happens. Then I would try the rolling stock. 

Good luck!

  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Vancouver Island, BC
  • 21,266 posts
Posted by selector on Thursday, January 11, 2018 1:09 PM

Could this be more of a temperature problem?  Is there a thermal safety circuit in those circuit breakers that might be popping for thermal reasons and not due to shorts?

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 24,171 posts
Posted by rrinker on Thursday, January 11, 2018 1:35 PM

 If the trip current was set too low, the short should have cleared when everything was taken off the track - 0 current. Unless EB-1's don't auto reset.

                                   --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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