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Tortoise switch machine power supply

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  • Member since
    October, 2016
  • 8 posts
Tortoise switch machine power supply
Posted by Mullet19 on Monday, May 08, 2017 12:44 AM

Hi

i have a question for the experts here. I am confused on powerI got my switch machines. I have a 12v 1 amp power supply that plugs into the wall and the other end is a barrel plug. What am I plugging that into that will feed my bus lines for switch machines??

 

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  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, May 08, 2017 5:16 AM

You Could plug your barrel plug into one of these and distribute the power to your turnout controls from it...

http://www.modeltrainstuff.com/Miller-Engineering-Power-Distribution-Board-p/mil-4805.htm

Sure, it's made for Miller signs but you can use it for any DC load.

OR you could just snip the barrel plug off and wire the power supply to your own terminal strip of choice.

I have found that the plus wire is "usually" the one marked with the white tracer but you can test that with a DC meter. With a Tortoise it really doesn't matter, if it doesn't go the direction you planned just switch terminals 1 and 8 on the machine.

Good Luck,

Ed

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  • From: Dearborn Station
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Posted by richhotrain on Monday, May 08, 2017 5:29 AM

As Ed said, you could cut off the barrel plug and connect the two wires from the wall wart to the switch machine bus wires.

Is your wall wart AC or DC, and is it regulated or non-regulated? These issues matter as well.

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by peahrens on Monday, May 08, 2017 7:59 AM

I stripped the wire after snipping off the plug.  Ran one wire thru a fuse holder with a 3/4 A fast blow fuse. Then to terminal block for connectong downstream wiring.  In my case to barrier strips in my control panel then to DPDTs for Torti.

Paul

Modeling HO with a transition era UP bent

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, May 08, 2017 9:23 AM

I use a 9 volt wall wart.  The lower voltage causes the points to move more slowly and I like that more than a faster throw.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by Mullet19 on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 12:18 AM

Thanks for all the responses. I have a much clearer idea what to do now. 

one of the questions was about power supply. It outputs 12v of filtered dc 

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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 5:46 AM

Mullet19

one of the questions was about power supply. It outputs 12v of filtered dc 

That is good. A regulated 12 volt DC power supply is just what you need to accomplish your objective. 
 
Now, just cut off the barrel plug and connect the two wire from the power supply to the bus wires.
 
Rich

Alton Junction

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    April, 2017
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Posted by GrandTrunk-HO on Thursday, May 11, 2017 2:25 PM

Tortoise switch machine power supply

Mullet19

I have a 12v 1 amp power supply that plugs into the wall

It outputs 12v of filtered dc

MisterBeasley

I use a 9 volt wall wart

The lower voltage causes the points to move more slowly and I like that more than a faster throw

richhotrain

That is good

A regulated 12 volt DC power supply is just what you need to accomplish your objective

Sorry to inform all of you, but only very old "Linear" V-DC power supplies were regulated. (now obsolete).

All present day power supplies and wall adapters are now only "Switching" V-DC power supplies.

The Tortoise switch machine is a (3) pole V-DC stall motor and is always drawing a constant power supply (current).

All Tortoise switch machines are connected in parallel to a V-AC or V-DC power supply.

As previously stated, you can use a (Miller Engineering 4805 Power Distribution Board) to connect (2) wires to each individual DPDT switch, that then goes to each individual Tortoise switch machine.

DPDT switch's are usually grouped together on a front panel on a small or medium home model train layout. There is absolutely nothing wrong with this procedure, but it requires much longer and a bundle of small connecting wires.

I am presently rewiring my old (2002) DCC HO scale model train layout to (2017) DCC. I have (27) DPDT switch's to control my (27) Tortoise switch machine's. I will be mounting (2) buss wires (+) and (-). Using #14 (1/16") Dia. solid copper wire with the wire insulation removed.   

As previously stated, the Tortoise switch machine operating at 12.V-DC, will have the Tie Bar, moving the (2) switch track rail contacts much faster.

Using a 9.V-DC will have the moving (2) switch track rail contacts move much slower, more prototype (realistic). 

I will be reducing the 12.V-DC power supply to each of my Tortoise switch machine's, down to around 9.V-DC. The internal (9) gear drive connections make a lot of gear noise at 12.V-DC. 

Add a variable resistor (Potentiometer) to reduce the 12.V-DC power supply down to around a 9.V-DC. 

Caution;

As the V-DC power supply is reduced, so will be the constant V-DC power supply to each Tortoise switch machine, in stall mode, to supply a constant pressure on the (2) switch track contacts.

Tortoise Switch Machine

Lowest = 4 ma. during operation.

Lowest = 15—16 ma. at stall, for each individual switch machine (always on).

Calculations;

Power supply; 12.V-DC

Power Supply; 1.Amp

 

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Posted by richg1998 on Thursday, May 11, 2017 3:44 PM

I prefer 9 vdc also.

I used an LM317 voltage regulator, couple resistors and a couple caps, plus a heat sink for the regulator. Just a small piece of aluminum. I used the LM317 that has a tab for heat sinking.

Specs can found online with a voltage calculator and diagram.

I did the same for the signal system which uses TTL chips at 5vdc.

Rich

N

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    January, 2010
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Posted by peahrens on Thursday, May 11, 2017 4:26 PM

GrandTrunk-HO
Sorry to inform all of you, but only very old "Linear" V-DC power supplies were regulated. (now obsolete). All present day power supplies and wall adapters are now only "Switching" V-DC power supplies.

Can you clarify about regulated power supplies?  Are they now unavailable, less avaliable, being phase out for some reason.  I have bought a number (two last week) of these Miniatronics regulated supplies for my building and signal lighting circuits.  It says it is regulated, which I understand to mean it should provide close to the target 12v DC at various loads up to the rated 1A.   

http://www.hobbylinc.com/miniatronics-plug-in-wall-transformer,-regulated-12v-dc-1amp-model-railroad-electrical-wt12

On my Tortoises, I used the Circuitron supply available in 2012.  I don't recall whether is was stated to be regulated, or just filtered (not the same thing).  For my Tortoises I happened to include a bipolar LED indicator at my DPDT in line with the power to each Tortoise.  The LED drop of 2v or so means the Tortoises see about 10v, with the Circuitron supply powering 21 Tortii.

Paul

Modeling HO with a transition era UP bent

  • Member since
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  • From: Bedford, MA, USA
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Posted by MisterBeasley on Thursday, May 11, 2017 5:00 PM

I like to add a fuse into my various layout power supply circuits.  Once the system is wired and running properly, it's not likely to ever need a fuse, but it might save you a power supply if you make a mistake while wiring or you cross terminals with a screwdriver while working under you layout on something else.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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    April, 2017
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Posted by GrandTrunk-HO on Friday, May 12, 2017 8:26 AM

Switching Power Supply

These types of power supplies are much cheaper to manufacture, much smaller and release much less transformer heat.

peahrens

Can you clarify about regulated power supplies?  Are they now unavailable, less available, being phase out for some reason.  

I have bought a number (two last week) of these Miniatronics regulated supplies for my building and signal lighting circuits.  

It says it is regulated, which I understand to mean it should provide close to the target 12v DC at various loads up to the rated 1A.   

Sorry, I stand corrected. I did not realize that you can still purchase a wall AC/DC wall adaptor that is a switching power supply that is Regulated.

A voltage regulator is a device that controls or maintains a constant voltage output of a power supply. Some (more expensive) V-DC power adapters have voltage regulators built in, while most do not.

Miniatronics is selling (4) different plug-in wall AC/DC adaptors. Only model # WT12 is regulated and costs almost twice as much compared to the other (3) AC/DC adaptors.

This UL approved transformer is perfect for those times you must have 12 volts DC and can not exceed those specifications. Using this transformer will assure you that all of your 12 volt accessories will always function as they were designed for. 12 volt bulbs will last much longer using a regulated transformer thus avoiding a failure due to higher voltage surging through your bulbs.

Digitrax PS2012

A 12 to 23 V-DC 20.Amp (Regulated) switching power supply.

Digitrax PS514

A 12 to 24 V-DC 70.W (Not Regulated) switching power supply.

  

  • Member since
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Posted by GrandTrunk-HO on Friday, May 12, 2017 8:34 AM

Tortoise Switch Machine Power Supply

richg1998

I prefer 9 vdc also.

I used an LM317 voltage regulator, couple resistors and a couple caps, plus a heat sink for the regulator. Just a small piece of aluminum. I used the LM317 that has a tab for heat sinking.

Great idea about bringing up the LM317 voltage regulator. I totally forgot about going this electrical procedure.

I actually use many different types of step down Boosters, using a voltage regulator to control low V-DC voltages. There is no need to build a custom voltage regulator. Ebay sells many dozens of different types of Boosters.

This looks perfect to supply V-DC power to all Tortoise switch machines. There are Ebay listings for around $5.00 and it comes in a blue or a green colored circuit board.

LM2596 based 1.25V-DC --> 37.V-DC (3.Amp), fully adjustable Buck voltage regulator with a LED display. (voltage input -OR- voltage output).

Features of LM2596 Adjustable Buck Voltage Regulator

Voltmeter error is ±0.1V in the range of 0~40V. (Please make sure that the input voltage is 4V or more).

Press the micro switch to measuring input / output voltage. LED light indicator will show, which voltage is currently displaying.

Power off memory function show that circuit voltage values measured for the last time before switched off.

Wide Input voltage range:4V~40V (Input voltage must be higher than to the output voltage of more than 1V).

Output voltage adjustable range is 1.25V~37 Volt

Maximum output current is up to 3A, normal and stable operating current of 2A.

Press the micro switch for 3 seconds to turn off LED display, touch the button again to turn on the LED display.

The internal oscillation frequency 150KHz, belonging to the second generation of switching voltage regulator,

low power consumption, high efficiency.

Red color 7 segment display will show the input and output voltage often by pressing micro switch.

Useful to make high energy efficient variable DC power supply unit with less components.

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Dearborn Station
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Posted by richhotrain on Friday, May 12, 2017 12:56 PM

GrandTrunk-HO

Tortoise switch machine power supply 

Mullet19

I have a 12v 1 amp power supply that plugs into the wall

It outputs 12v of filtered dc 

 
MisterBeasley

I use a 9 volt wall wart

The lower voltage causes the points to move more slowly and I like that more than a faster throw

  

richhotrain

That is good

A regulated 12 volt DC power supply is just what you need to accomplish your objective 

Sorry to inform all of you, but only very old "Linear" V-DC power supplies were regulated. (now obsolete).

All present day power supplies and wall adapters are now only "Switching" V-DC power supplies.

peahrens

 

 
GrandTrunk-HO
Sorry to inform all of you, but only very old "Linear" V-DC power supplies were regulated. (now obsolete). All present day power supplies and wall adapters are now only "Switching" V-DC power supplies.

 

Can you clarify about regulated power supplies?  Are they now unavailable, less avaliable, being phase out for some reason.  I have bought a number (two last week) of these Miniatronics regulated supplies for my building and signal lighting circuits.  It says it is regulated, which I understand to mean it should provide close to the target 12v DC at various loads up to the rated 1A.   

http://www.hobbylinc.com/miniatronics-plug-in-wall-transformer,-regulated-12v-dc-1amp-model-railroad-electrical-wt12

On my Tortoises, I used the Circuitron supply available in 2012.  I don't recall whether is was stated to be regulated, or just filtered (not the same thing).  For my Tortoises I happened to include a bipolar LED indicator at my DPDT in line with the power to each Tortoise.  The LED drop of 2v or so means the Tortoises see about 10v, with the Circuitron supply powering 21 Tortii. 

Sorry, I stand corrected. I did not realize that you can still purchase a wall AC/DC wall adaptor that is a switching power supply that is Regulated.

 ConfusedConfused

Alton Junction

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    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
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Posted by rrinker on Friday, May 12, 2017 7:48 PM

 A switching power supply is regulated. Just in a different way (actually more efficient) than a linear voltage regulator. End result is it will have a consistend output voltage across a wide load range, instead of being way over nominal voltage with only 1 Tortoise connected and well under with 15 of them.

 There is a case where the 12V supply is preferred - if you put LEDs in series with the Tortoise as indicators, they will drop the voltage, about 2.1-2.5 volts per LED, so starting with 12V results in less than 10V to the Tortoise. 2 sets of LEDs are common, one for signals and one for control panel indicators, so that's 4.2-5V drop. The Tortoise will operate much more quietly on 7-8 volts plus you will have indicator LEDs without using the contacts on the Tortoise.

                           --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by BMMECNYC on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 8:53 PM

I just use a SPST ON-ON SPDT switch and 12VDC.  Center contact on SPST SPDT is wired to one side of the tortoise, the other side is wired to common.  The other two contacts on the SPST SPDT are +12VDC and -12VDC.   Flip switch, tortoise moves one way, flip again, it moves other way.  Easy.  LEDs can be wired up using aux contacts.  

Once I have time, I will be switching over to push buttons to facilitate the installation of Layout Command Control, using RR Circuits components.

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
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Posted by JoeinPA on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 8:57 PM

BMMECNYC

I think that you mean SPDT?

Joe

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Posted by BMMECNYC on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 9:11 PM

JoeinPA

BMMECNYC

I think that you mean SPDT?

Joe

 

Yes,

Its an On-On SPDT.  Tired.

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.

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