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Insulating material

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  • Member since
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  • From: Wisconsin
  • 450 posts
Insulating material
Posted by Trynn_Allen2 on Wednesday, April 9, 2008 10:00 AM

After replacing the inner workings of my Little Joe, I have found an additional problem.

I have checked the gauge of the drivers and they are in gauge.  The side frames are straight, but there is enough slop in the play of the drivers to edge up against the side frames and bam there goes the Overload light on the Tech II.  Is there a thin brush on material that I could paint the outside of drivers and the inside of the sideframes that would stop the shorting?

  • Member since
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  • From: Orig: Tyler Texas. Lived in seven countries, now live in Sundown, Louisiana
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Posted by jeffrey-wimberly on Wednesday, April 9, 2008 10:32 AM
Try clear fingernail polish.

Running Bear, Sundown, Louisiana
          Joined June, 2004

Dr. Frankendiesel aka Scott Running Bear
Space Mouse for president!
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  • Member since
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  • From: Pennsylvania
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Posted by nedthomas on Wednesday, April 9, 2008 11:06 AM
Try installing an thin insulating washer on the axle between the driver and frame. You only need to do it on insulated side. Cut a "v" in the washer with the bottom of the "v" a little less than the diameter of the axle. You should be able to side the washer on the axle without removing the driver. Kadee sells insulating washers made of fiber that will work fine.
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  • From: Ulster Co. NY
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Posted by larak on Wednesday, April 9, 2008 10:13 PM

 jeffrey-wimberly wrote:
Try clear fingernail polish.

... or any other kind of lacquer. (I know - some polish is no longer lacquer based, I try to find the kind that is. I've been using in electronics for years.)

For a really durable but somewhat thicker coating look something called "Scotchkote" by 3M company. Great stuff, durable and sticks to everything.

Karl 

The mind is like a parachute. It works better when it's open.  www.stremy.net

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  • From: Wisconsin
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Posted by Trynn_Allen2 on Thursday, April 10, 2008 12:01 PM
 larak wrote:

 jeffrey-wimberly wrote:
Try clear fingernail polish.

... or any other kind of lacquer. (I know - some polish is no longer lacquer based, I try to find the kind that is. I've been using in electronics for years.)

For a really durable but somewhat thicker coating look something called "Scotchkote" by 3M company. Great stuff, durable and sticks to everything.

Karl 

 

How durable?  From the looks of things this is going to be a fairly common rub, unless I can figure out a way to either bend the frame slightly or thin the drive wheels a bit.

  • Member since
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  • From: Orig: Tyler Texas. Lived in seven countries, now live in Sundown, Louisiana
  • 25,640 posts
Posted by jeffrey-wimberly on Thursday, April 10, 2008 1:10 PM
I don't know how durable it is overall. I use it on turnouts that show a propensity to shorting when metal wheels connect across to adjacent rails at the frogs. I run my trains a lot and usually have to recoat the areas about every two and a half to three months. Your results may vary.

Running Bear, Sundown, Louisiana
          Joined June, 2004

Dr. Frankendiesel aka Scott Running Bear
Space Mouse for president!
15 year veteran fire fighter
Collector of Apple //e's
Running Bear Enterprises
History Channel Club life member.
beatus homo qui invenit sapientiam


  • Member since
    October 2005
  • From: Ulster Co. NY
  • 1,464 posts
Posted by larak on Thursday, April 10, 2008 6:23 PM
 Trynn_Allen2 wrote:
 

How durable?  From the looks of things this is going to be a fairly common rub, unless I can figure out a way to either bend the frame slightly or thin the drive wheels a bit.

Scotchkote will stand up to a lot of abuse, much more than lacquer which is good , but  in a situation where you have constant rubbing I would go with something slippery like UHMW plastic  or (maybe?) styrene. You probably don't have a lot of room though. Some permanent alteration to the  geometry would be the best solution. Without seeing the actual mechanism it's tricky to give a useful and definite answer. Where does the side to side play originate? There may be a way to limit it at a bearing or carrier. 

 

The mind is like a parachute. It works better when it's open.  www.stremy.net

  • Member since
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  • From: Wisconsin
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Posted by Trynn_Allen2 on Friday, April 11, 2008 8:02 AM

The side play originates inside of the transfer case.  There is nothing to prevent the axles from slopping back and forth.  I thought about putting a shim inside the transfer case, but since I already have problems with binding in the cases, I didn't want to add more.  I am going to check the wheels again, just in case I missed something, and also compare the sloppy axles with the axles that aren't.  I do wonder if the two halves of the axles were pressed in tight onto the axle gear, and that might be some of it.

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