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Power Supplies

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  • Member since
    March, 2008
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Power Supplies
Posted by MVRail on Monday, March 03, 2008 3:09 PM
Where do I find seperate power supplies for my lighting, switch machines and other uses.  Specifically 5 volt  and 12 volt supply.  Looking for supply not associated with track supply.
  • Member since
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  • From: Winnipeg, Manitoba
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Posted by Seamonster on Monday, March 03, 2008 3:27 PM

If the load isn't too high you can use "wall warts."  You can get them up to 1.5 amps.  You could use more than one and divide your lighting into sections.  You can also purchase a 12 volt power supply at any electronics store or mail order, and even Radio Shack sells them.  You can get power supplies with capacities of several amps.

 

..... Bob

Beam me up, Scotty, there's no intelligent life down here. (Captain Kirk)

I reject your reality and substitute my own. (Adam Savage)

Resistance is not futile--it is voltage divided by current.

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  • From: Hot'lanta, Gawga
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Posted by Rotorranch on Monday, March 03, 2008 3:30 PM

 Jake: How often does the train go by? Elwood: So often you won't even notice ...

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Posted by tstage on Monday, March 03, 2008 3:34 PM

MVRail,

Or, you can use an old DC power supply/transformer and "dial it down" to the voltage that you need.  You may want to add a physical stop to it so that no one accidentally turns it up and blows out your lights.

Tom

http://www.newyorkcentralmodeling.com

Time...It marches on...without ever turning around to see if anyone is even keeping in step.

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Posted by jeffrey-wimberly on Monday, March 03, 2008 4:20 PM
I use an old AT computer power supply for most of my non-track power (structure lighting). The power supply puts out 12v and 5v DC. I power the switch machines with an old Bachmann trainset power pack.

Running Bear, Sundown, Louisiana
          Joined June, 2004

Dr. Frankendiesel aka Scott Running Bear
Space Mouse for president!
15 year veteran fire fighter
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beatus homo qui invenit sapientiam


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Posted by tomikawaTT on Monday, March 03, 2008 4:44 PM

I have an accumulation of old train set power packs (garage sale prizes, collected by my sister,) wall warts from dead battery powered tools, plus a power supply built around the radio shack filament transformer Rotor included as his first post.  The ones currently in use plug into a power bar (with circuit breaker) which, in turn, is plugged into the dedicated layout power circuit downstream of the, "Kill everything," switch.

Dedicated layout power circuit?  That's what you get when you unplug the garage door opener and plug the trunk of the 120V layout power tree into the vacated socket.

Chuck (modeling Central Japan in September, 1964)

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Posted by Stevert on Monday, March 03, 2008 6:39 PM

Lots of pople throw away old PC's, look for one and use it's power supply.  You can even find new PC power supplies that are cheap, if you look hard enough.  Wink [;)]

  There are lots of places on the Web with instructions on how to use them for non-computer purposes (since they're switching power supplies, you have to provide a load).  Here's one example:  http://web2.murraystate.edu/andy.batts/ps/POWERSUPPLY.HTM
 

HTH,
Steve 

  • Member since
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  • From: Orig: Tyler Texas. Lived in seven countries, now live in Sundown, Louisiana
  • 25,640 posts
Posted by jeffrey-wimberly on Monday, March 03, 2008 8:25 PM
Try to get a power supply from an old AT type computer. You don't need to do anything to them to get them to work. If use one from an ATX type computer you have to add a large resistor to put a load on it so it'll work.

Running Bear, Sundown, Louisiana
          Joined June, 2004

Dr. Frankendiesel aka Scott Running Bear
Space Mouse for president!
15 year veteran fire fighter
Collector of Apple //e's
Running Bear Enterprises
History Channel Club life member.
beatus homo qui invenit sapientiam


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