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Wahsatch and Union Pacific

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  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Colorful Colorado
  • 191 posts
Wahsatch and Union Pacific
Posted by bb4884 on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 5:09 PM

Hello, I have settled on the idea of modeling the Union Pacific over Wasatch. Ihave a couple of questions first:

 

1: Did UP run any regular service passenger trains over the main line? The year I am going to model is either 1944, 1945, or 1946. Please include pulling power and roster.

2: What would be an apporite track code(83 for example)?

3:Is this even possable? I am going to build this in a double car garage(insulated and heated)

 

 

Thanks for all help in advance.

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 302,230 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 7:01 PM

1.  Yes, quite a fleet every day, actually!  You'll find all the detail you need in William Kratville, Union Pacific Streamliners, as well as Official Guides.  Official Guides for these years are readily available on eBay and through railroad book dealers, and the Kratville book I think is still in print.  If not it shouldn't be hard to find.

2.  Rail in the 1944-46 period on the main track varied from 95lb to 132lb, depending on where exactly you were.  Code 83 is a reasonable choice.

3.  It really depends what you're happy with.  People have modeled "more" in "less" but the results might not be to your fancy. 

S. Hadid 

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Colorful Colorado
  • 191 posts
Posted by bb4884 on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 3:31 PM
Thanks for the book title, looks like a must. I'll go down to the hobby store and see if they have one.
  • Member since
    August, 2003
  • From: Near Promentory UT
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Posted by dldance on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 6:10 PM

PS - the UP uses the spelling Wahsatch in refering to the sidings on the grade.

dd

  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • 257 posts
Posted by nobullchitbids on Thursday, March 29, 2007 8:43 PM

Kratville's book focuses on the Streamliners, which would have been pulled by early E units in 1944-1946.  All equipment would have been painted in Streamliner colors showing the name of thr train and displaying multiple herealds (U.P., S.P., and C.N.W.).

U.P. also ran some more classic consists -- the San Francisco Overland Limited, Los Angeles Limited, the Challenger, the Overland Mail, and I believe the Transcom all were run during this time, and they would have been hauled by Fetters Northerns or (when Northerns were not available) heavy Mountains.  In most of your period, the Northerns would have been painted black with aluminum lettering, but beginning in 1946, beginning with the 809 in May, the Northerns were bedecked first in grey-pet, then in grey-lady paint schemes.

By the late 1940s, U.P. was using 131-lb. rail in the Wahsatch.  However, at least some of this was installed during the 1948 rebuilding.  Prior to then, 112-lb. probably was more common.  So, your main line should have code-75 to code-83 rail on it, with code-70 in the yards and sidings.

Don't forget that U.P. runs left-handed in the Wahsatch to take advantage of an easier eastward grade.  It switches back to regular running at Curvo, where the left-hand track tunnels under the right-hand one.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Colorful Colorado
  • 191 posts
Posted by bb4884 on Sunday, April 01, 2007 2:05 AM
 Thanks for the info nobullchitbids(love the name).  I have decided to model the month of September in 1945(an important month). It is good to know there were steamers still running some of the passengers around, since I have enacted a layout-wide ban on all diesel engines. Never support the enemy.
  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • 257 posts
Posted by nobullchitbids on Monday, April 02, 2007 7:17 PM

Well, you will need at least a few early E-unit diesels to pull the streamliners, and there may have been a few switchers. 

In 1945, U.P. still had many of its old steamers -- keep your eyes open for Harriman engines built for other roads (Southern Pacific mostly).  Brass P-1s are cheap, and with a new tender readily double for U.P. P-77 lights.  S.P. S-10s and S-12s also can be modified for U.P. service.

Also, remember that in September 1945, the Fetters Northerns still were in coal.  They were not switched to oil until the following year, in response to a threatened coal strike.

U.P. did not really dieselize until the early 1950s, in part because it owned its own coal mines, (so the fuel was free), and in part because the road recently had acquired numerous modern steam plants (the challengers and northerns).  Also, the war made it impossible to get diesel units -- one needed virtually an act of Congress to secure those, and the man U.P. needed to get that accomplished -- Otto Jabelmann -- was killed during the war.  A great loss to the company, but the ultimate benefit to steam fans everywhere.

Must have books:  Emil Albrecht, Union Pacific Small Steam Power.  Includes the Northerns and 2-10-2s (what is "small" on the Union Pacific); Wm. Kratville (I think) or perhaps James Ehrenberger, Smoke Across the Divide; Kratville & Ranks, Motive Power of the Union Pacific.  And by joining the U.P. historical society, you can get a discount on the sociey'e "roster" series, showing most of the U.P.'s steam fleet by type.

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