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How do I handle a facing point interchange

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  • Member since
    October, 2001
  • From: OH
  • 16,888 posts
Posted by BRAKIE on Friday, June 14, 2019 6:55 PM

jeffhergert
Maybe those holding group sessions could have those who exceeded the work rules claim an extra donut at the end of the session.

In that case I'll make sure I exceed the work rules in order to get that extra donut--well if its the kind I like or maybe not seeing I like all types of donuts.

Its been many years since I've read a contract book so,I was mistaken unless they changed the work rules since my days.

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

“Shut one’s eyes tight or open one’s arms wide, either way, one’s a fool.” Flemeth-the witch of the Wilds.
  • Member since
    January, 2002
  • From: Equestria
  • 6,945 posts
Posted by zugmann on Sunday, June 16, 2019 7:29 AM

Your claim is without merit, therefore your extra donut is denied.

 The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 4,922 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, June 16, 2019 9:34 AM

jeffhergert
The application and enforcing of work rules is something that's hard to replicate on a model railroad. Maybe those holding group sessions could have those who exceeded the work rules claim an extra donut at the end of the session.

.

Way back when... when I was in College in Nashville, there was a layout owner that "paid" the crews with his wife's home-made chocolate chip cookies.

.

She always made an extra batch for me to take home to my room-mates.

.

I guess I should have been putting in extra work!

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Central Iowa
  • 4,843 posts
Posted by jeffhergert on Monday, June 17, 2019 4:37 PM

I believe they have to order you to do something beyond what the contract calls for.  If you volunteer, they don't owe you anything.

We can change out crews anywhere within the switching limits, which is about a 12 mile zone around our terminal.  (Note.  Switching limits are a contractual thing, not a rule book thing.  It is the limits switch crews can operate without penalty.  They do not necessarily match any yard limits, a rule book/time table item, at a terminal.) There is a point about a mile east of the east boundary where sometimes we change out going west.  If the dispatcher orders us to go there, it is (for engineers) an 8 hour basic day penalty claim.  (Which is usually cut to 4 hours, something the conductors get automatically.  They signed a 25 mile zone agreement to relieve trains within the zone for an extra 4 hours pay.)  If we go out on our own, which we might do if the inbound crew is a pretty decent one and been on duty a long time and asks nicely, we can claim nothing.

Jeff     

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Central Iowa
  • 4,843 posts
Posted by jeffhergert on Monday, June 17, 2019 4:47 PM

SeeYou190

 

 
jeffhergert
The application and enforcing of work rules is something that's hard to replicate on a model railroad. Maybe those holding group sessions could have those who exceeded the work rules claim an extra donut at the end of the session.

 

.

Way back when... when I was in College in Nashville, there was a layout owner that "paid" the crews with his wife's home-made chocolate chip cookies.

.

She always made an extra batch for me to take home to my room-mates.

.

I guess I should have been putting in extra work!

.

-Kevin

.

 

As long as you weren't paid in "brownies."

 wx4.org/to/foam/warstories/safety_discipline_employee/discipline/brownies.html
 

Jeff 
 

  • Member since
    October, 2001
  • From: OH
  • 16,888 posts
Posted by BRAKIE on Monday, June 17, 2019 9:03 PM

jeffhergert
As long as you weren't paid in "brownies."

Jeff,On the PRR one wasn't considered a experiance railroad man unless he had a brownie or two.

Of course back then 90% of the trainmasters and division superintendents  started  as brakeman and worked their way up the ladder. A brownie was rewarded with a slap on the wrist.

You could get  a terminnation of service letter for major operation or safety rule violations.

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

“Shut one’s eyes tight or open one’s arms wide, either way, one’s a fool.” Flemeth-the witch of the Wilds.

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