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Big Boy 4014

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Posted by Eastrail11 on Monday, May 06, 2019 2:29 PM

Why only have 2 sets of drivers when you can have 3, The Triplex Laugh

~Eastrail

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  • From: Reading, PA
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Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, May 07, 2019 8:53 AM

 The 3 Erie ones could barely make 10mph, and the Virginian one was barely good for 5mph. Utter failures. Too slow even for the helper service hey were designed for.

                                           --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Wednesday, May 08, 2019 8:14 AM

Fox Business just had a short live bit on 4014 and said they would be following it live, all day.  It's not going to be like George Bush's train, but they did have a decent close up of the engine.  If you don't like Fox, turn the sound down.

I don't see anything right now on Youtube that is live.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by oldline1 on Wednesday, May 08, 2019 3:16 PM

Well, I have to admit to not being a big fan of the Union Pacific and especially the Big Boy but I have to be amazed at the sight of the 4014 actually running in 2019! My admiration for the UP Steam Program and just what you can do with money and determination. Just a shame the Challenger isn't with them and 4449 wasn't there to represent the other part of the Golden Spike team. I'm glad the 844 is along to share the glory. The FEF's are my one class of UP steam I love to see.

Thank you, UP, for making so many folks world wide happy! 

oldline1

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, May 09, 2019 3:53 PM

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by gregc on Friday, May 10, 2019 3:31 AM

driver wheel diameter of 68", cylinder sizes ~24x32", adhesive weight of 540 tons (see Big Boy)

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Friday, May 10, 2019 6:15 AM

It's definitely nice to see a big steam engine restored and operational.

But what kills it for me is there seems to always be a diesel "baby sitter" when you see steam run anymore.  This just ruins it for me.  It's like they don't trust steam or the lawyers or something.  

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

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Posted by railandsail on Friday, May 10, 2019 7:03 AM

rrinker

 Steam was gone in the US by the time I was born, but from an early age I've been on various tourist railroads riding behind steam. Even some smaller stuff, like 18" gauge and 1 1/2" scale. Plenty of full size standard gauge steam locos - we are lucky to have many operating steam locos around here. 

 Funny thing, while Alco diesels are my favorites, I do like Baldwin switchers, abd Baldwin steam locos - probably from having a copy of Fred Westing's Baldwin book since I was a kid, and there is a page comparing the Big Boy to the DM&IR Yellowstones which outdid the Big Boy in some characteristics.

                                            --Randy

 

 

How about a comparision with the C&O Allegheny?

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Posted by Lonnie Utah on Friday, May 10, 2019 9:56 AM

riogrande5761
But what kills it for me is there seems to always be a diesel "baby sitter" when you see steam run anymore.  This just ruins it for me.  It's like they don't trust steam or the lawyers or something.  

 

One of the things much talked about among the railfans I talked to is/was UP should have used the sole remaining operational Centennial (6936) to escort the Big Boy and 844 to Utah.  The Big Boy and Centennial running together would have been a sight to see. 

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, May 11, 2019 10:32 PM

railandsail

 

 
rrinker

 Steam was gone in the US by the time I was born, but from an early age I've been on various tourist railroads riding behind steam. Even some smaller stuff, like 18" gauge and 1 1/2" scale. Plenty of full size standard gauge steam locos - we are lucky to have many operating steam locos around here. 

 Funny thing, while Alco diesels are my favorites, I do like Baldwin switchers, abd Baldwin steam locos - probably from having a copy of Fred Westing's Baldwin book since I was a kid, and there is a page comparing the Big Boy to the DM&IR Yellowstones which outdid the Big Boy in some characteristics.

                                            --Randy

 

 

 

 

How about a comparision with the C&O Allegheny?

 

To best understand such comparisons, start by reading this:

http://steam.wesbarris.com/misc/largest.php

Amoung "successful" large steam designs, the BIG BOY is one of the leaders, but by no means the "best" or most powerful in any way.

The N&W Y6b had considerablely more tractive effort, 170,000 vs the BigBoy's 135,000.

The N&W Class A and the C&O H8 have 125,000 and 110,000 respectively.

Both the Class A and the H8 were more "nimble", that is they could maintain higher speeds on sharper curves, and "loose" less TE to the curve than a Big Boy - that is important in the east were routes are nearly continiously curving.

The Big Boy was faster - given a straight open road - 80 mph vs about 60 for the H8.

The H8 had the highest axle load weight, at 85,000 lbs, requiring exceptional track and road bed, the Class A also was heavy on each axle at 72,000 lbs, while the Big Boy is more "conventional" at only 67,000 lbs.

The C&O and the N&W were known for their exceptional and heavily built trackage, somewhat typical in the east. 

The H8 wins in the HP department, at 7,498 compared to 6,345 for the Big Boy.

Here is another good comparison chart:

http://steam.wesbarris.com/locobase.php?country=USA&wheel=2-6-6-6

The C&O never really used the H8 to its potential, it would have been interesting to how well they might have done in other types of service rather than slugging coal trains.

I think it is great that 4014 has been restored, but as an east coast modeler, I own Class A's and H8's, no Big Boys.......

Sheldon 

    

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Posted by railandsail on Sunday, May 12, 2019 6:48 PM

Big thanks Sheldon, that was a very interesting comparison of those big steamers.

Since my model railroad is going to span the distance from the east coast to the west coast, I get to have a little of both,...so I have a big boy, several H8's, and some of those N&W's. Yes

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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, May 13, 2019 8:15 AM

Thanks Greg

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by selector on Monday, May 13, 2019 1:39 PM

It's important to understand that horsepower is what makes any conveyance capable of moving tonnage over distance at a given rate. The greater the available horsepower, the faster you can get things done.  What limits the ability to apply horsepower to the rails on a steamer is it's adhesion...how sticky its tires are on the rails without spinning. As Mr. Krug explained in the widely disseminated paper years ago, horsepower is what helps a locomotive to keep to a timetable under changing demands.  For example, for each rise of 0.5% grade, a steamer's boiler must be able to provide 3 times the previous horsepower...IF one wants to retain the same speed.  If you don't mind slowing to a crawl, and can do that within schedules, then you needn't pour on the coal to keep speed. However, if the trailing tonnage is such that it causes the drivers to spin due to gravity on that same grade, all the horsepower in the world won't do a lick of good because the locomotive can't apply it without spinning out.  Train stalls, calls for a pusher, or breaks up the consist and takes half of it over the top, or it has to back and await help, whichever is most expedient and can be done safely.

The ideal locomotive produces only as much horsepower as it can apply to the rails.  Any more might be nice to have, but it's really wasted potential if all it will do is make the drivers spin under the locomotive.

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Posted by railandsail on Monday, May 13, 2019 3:42 PM

Replacing a BIG driver tire?

Is there a video, or a good series of photos of the replacement of the 'tire' on one of those really BIG driver wheels??

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Posted by selector on Monday, May 13, 2019 6:25 PM

There are different ways of achieving the aim, but this is a common one, and the tire diameter doesn't matter a whole lot...same process, a bit slower mebbe.

https://youtu.be/Im7FcwpbO1A

 

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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 8:15 AM

Maybe this is a bit closer to how they did those really big wheels?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQ-idHka0Zo

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