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Figuring Out Erie RR Signals for Layout

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  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Omaha, NE
  • 9,473 posts
Posted by dehusman on Sunday, January 06, 2019 5:26 PM

Why are you using approach mediums?

Approach medium is used in higher speed territory, where you want a longer distance to stop a train.  The progression of signals a train would see would be clear-approach medium-approach-stop.  I just seems like a curious choice, it says you are going to stop the train about 4-6 miles away.

I would suggest just using a clear g-r-r.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Omaha, NE
  • 9,473 posts
Posted by dehusman on Sunday, January 06, 2019 5:33 PM

Suggestion:

Since the gas station, bar, diner and grocery store will not be rail served, the track immediately behind them doesn't need to be an industry track.

Make that track the lead to East Yard and flip the engine house so it doesn't enter the main, it enters the lead.  That way switching around engines doesn't interfere with the main track or the interlocking.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

  • Member since
    November, 2018
  • From: Just another small town in Ohio
  • 155 posts
Posted by Erie1951 on Sunday, January 06, 2019 5:46 PM

dehusman

Why are you using approach mediums? Approach medium is used in higher speed territory, where you want a longer distance to stop a train.  The progression of signals a train would see would be clear-approach medium-approach-stop.  I just seems like a curious choice, it says you are going to stop the train about 4-6 miles away. I would suggest just using a clear g-r-r.

In this case, the layout is set in an urban area with additional trackage leading to a DL&W junction and to another Erie yard not that far away. Perhaps an "approach slow" would be a better choice? That would be Erie RR's Rule #284, Y-R-G.

Russ

Modeling the early '50s Erie in Paterson, NJ.  Here's the link to my railroad postcard collection: https://railroadpostcards.blogspot.com/

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Omaha, NE
  • 9,473 posts
Posted by dehusman on Sunday, January 06, 2019 6:38 PM

Erie1951
Perhaps an "approach slow" would be a better choice? That would be Erie RR's Rule #284, Y-R-G.

There must be a reason you are using these odd signal indications?  Any indication that has the term "approach" in it is slowing a train down to be prepared to stop and next signal or the signal after that.  What are you trying to do that clear or approach doesn't do? Remember clear doesn't mean "go 60 mph".  Clear means go track speed.  If the speed limit on the track is 20 mph, clear lets you go 20 mph.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

  • Member since
    November, 2018
  • From: Just another small town in Ohio
  • 155 posts
Posted by Erie1951 on Monday, January 07, 2019 9:17 AM

Thanks for helping me think this out, Dave. You're right. "Clear" would make sense and I wasn't taking track speed into consideration. The track speed in this area wouldn't be more than 20 mph because of the short distances involved. The Erie signal for clear would be G-R-R, then, at track speed. This is all new to me and I appreciate your comments and questions.

Russ

Modeling the early '50s Erie in Paterson, NJ.  Here's the link to my railroad postcard collection: https://railroadpostcards.blogspot.com/

  • Member since
    November, 2015
  • 43 posts
Posted by ROCK MILW on Monday, January 07, 2019 10:01 AM

Here is a link to Erie signal/switch diagrams, which show signal locations, number of arms (heads), and CTC panel components in interlocking situations: http://www.rrsignalpix.com/erie_prints.php

  • Member since
    November, 2018
  • From: Just another small town in Ohio
  • 155 posts
Posted by Erie1951 on Monday, January 07, 2019 3:58 PM

Interesting stuff, Rock. Thumbs Up

Russ

Modeling the early '50s Erie in Paterson, NJ.  Here's the link to my railroad postcard collection: https://railroadpostcards.blogspot.com/

  • Member since
    November, 2018
  • From: Just another small town in Ohio
  • 155 posts
Posted by Erie1951 on Friday, January 11, 2019 4:50 PM

dehusman
Suggestion: Since the gas station, bar, diner and grocery store will not be rail served, the track immediately behind them doesn't need to be an industry track. Make that track the lead to East Yard and flip the engine house so it doesn't enter the main, it enters the lead.  That way switching around engines doesn't interfere with the main track or the interlocking.

Thanks for the suggestion. I rearranged the track at the textile mill to accommodate a track so that switchers can enter the diesel house that way. Also, the signal heads facing into the crossovers will show the "clear" indication for trains leaving the yard area not to exceed track speed.

Russ

Modeling the early '50s Erie in Paterson, NJ.  Here's the link to my railroad postcard collection: https://railroadpostcards.blogspot.com/

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