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Easier in HO scale... Not all that hard in 1:1 either

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  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: North Dakota
  • 7,807 posts
Easier in HO scale... Not all that hard in 1:1 either
Posted by BroadwayLion on Friday, December 07, 2018 10:23 AM

 

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

  • Member since
    August, 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
  • 6,784 posts
Posted by gmpullman on Friday, December 07, 2018 7:16 PM

Before there was YouTube they had to do it like this:

 NYC_Carshop by Edmund, on Flickr

Watch those jacks!

Ed

  • Member since
    May, 2010
  • 3,271 posts
Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, December 07, 2018 9:16 PM

I have one of those jacks, and when I got it, the guy called a railroad jack.  It was at a construction action, and at the time, I used to do underpinning jobs, building a basement under a house that originally had no basement.  Actually, I had 2 of them, don't remember what happened to the other other one.

Mike

  • Member since
    December, 2001
  • 562 posts
Posted by mvlandsw on Sunday, December 09, 2018 12:30 AM

I used to do that with air operated jacks. It must be fun with manual jacks.

They seemed to have raised the car much higher than necessary to work on the truck. Maybe they had other work to do on the underframe.

  • Member since
    August, 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
  • 6,784 posts
Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, December 09, 2018 2:45 AM

mvlandsw
Maybe they had other work to do on the underframe.

Those look like shop trucks, too. No springs!

I have a Simplex jack similar to those in the photo. I call it a "track Jack" as there is also a small foot at the bottom where it can be placed under the base of a rail.

Regards, Ed

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 25,088 posts
Posted by rrinker on Sunday, December 09, 2018 10:49 AM

 I'm guessing they are either putting the shop truck on to send the car off for further repairs, or they are in the proces sof removing it to replace with a normal truck now that the car is repaired.

 As for height - maybe someone wanted to make it easier to hook up the brake rigging, having it that height makes it easy to get underneath, even thoughit's not strictly necessary to jack it up that high to pull a truck.

                      --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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