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Gray trucks on prototype cars?

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  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, January 01, 2018 10:03 AM

Trucks were almost always supplied painted black. If they were not masked during car painting, they would get a light overspray, or direct heavy spray, of the car color.

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Anyway... they would weather pretty quickly. Since we have so few color photographs of freight cars before the 60's, there is an awful lot of theorizing on this subject.

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My favorite way to paint trucks is to start with military drab green, and then add washes of black, brown, and rust. I tend to go a little light so they can be seen with normal layout lighting.

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Yes, gray cars could have very well had gray trucks, if the trucks were on the car when it was painted.

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, January 01, 2018 10:12 AM

SeeYou190

Trucks were almost always supplied painted black. If they were not masked during car painting, they would get a light overspray, or direct heavy spray, of the car color.

.

Anyway... they would weather pretty quickly. Since we have so few color photographs of freight cars before the 60's, there is an awful lot of theorizing on this subject.

.

My favorite way to paint trucks is to start with military drab green, and then add washes of black, brown, and rust. I tend to go a little light so they can be seen with normal layout lighting.

.

Yes, gray cars could have very well had gray trucks, if the trucks were on the car when it was painted.

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-Kevin

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Kevin, I can show you endless builder or shop photos of red oxide cars, with red oxide underframes and trucks.

One noteable road for this was the WESTERN MARYLAND, box cars and flat cars in particular.

I think every color photo I have ever seem of as WESTERN MARYLAND flat car has the trucks the same red oxide as the car.........

Sheldon

    

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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, January 01, 2018 10:28 AM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
Kevin, I can show you endless builder or shop photos of red oxide cars, with red oxide underframes and trucks.

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Sheldon,

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That is exactly what I said in my post. If the trucks were on the car when it was painted, and not masked, they would get the body color. It only makes sense.

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by 7j43k on Monday, January 01, 2018 11:17 AM

SeeYou190

Trucks were almost always supplied painted black. If they were not masked during car painting, they would get a light overspray, or direct heavy spray, of the car color.

 

 
The point of painting a freight car is primarily to protect it.  If you can't reach an area to paint it, it is not protected.  If trucks are installed during painting, it obstructs painting parts of the underframe.
 
So, I suspect strongly that freight cars, when built, were painted before the trucks were place.  Hence, no overspray on trucks when cars were first built.
 
Consider that there will always be a time during construction of a freight car when there are no trucks.  It is placed on its trucks very near the end of construction.  As noted above, it is better to paint without the trucks.
 
 
 
Once a car is out in the world, it IS sitting on its trucks.  And when it gets a repaint, there is probably little enthusiam for removing the body from the trucks.  And perhaps also some occasional lack of enthusiasm for masking.
 
 
Ed
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Posted by 7j43k on Monday, January 01, 2018 11:35 AM

SeeYou190

Since we have so few color photographs of freight cars before the 60's, there is an awful lot of theorizing on this subject.

 

 

When Great Northern chose the new boxcar paint scheme featuring Vermilion Red (instead of mineral red), it specified that the carbody was to be Vermilion, the underframe and trucks mineral.  And there are some color pictures to demonstrate that.

That was before the '60's.

 

Trucks were almost always supplied painted black.

I believe they were supplied unpainted.  And painted at the builder.

Does anyone here even know HOW trucks were supplied?  Assembled?  How d'ya know?  I'm pretty sure ACF could assemble truck pieces somewhere in the plant.  The parts would be easier to ship, compared to assembled trucks.  If they were shipped as parts, would the parts be painted at the supplier?  Or after the truck was assembled at the builder?

 

Ed

 

 

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  • From: Maryland
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, January 01, 2018 11:42 AM

7j43k

 

 
SeeYou190

Since we have so few color photographs of freight cars before the 60's, there is an awful lot of theorizing on this subject.

 

 

 

 

When Great Northern chose the new boxcar paint scheme featuring Vermilion Red (instead of mineral red), it specified that the carbody was to be Vermilion, the underframe and trucks mineral.  And there are some color pictures to demonstrate that.

That was before the '60's.

 

 

 

Trucks were almost always supplied painted black.

 

 

I believe they were supplied unpainted.  And painted at the builder.

Does anyone here even know HOW trucks were supplied?  Assembled?  How d'ya know?  I'm pretty sure ACF could assemble truck pieces somewhere in the plant.  The parts would be easier to ship, compared to assembled trucks.  If they were shipped as parts, would the parts be painted at the supplier?  Or after the truck was assembled at the builder?

 

Ed

 

 

 

It is my understanding that they generally arrived at the builders as parts.

For shipping reasons and because different customers might specify different "details" which would make specific parts different, spring rates, dampeners, wheel sets, types of brake shoes or rigging for specific applications.

And I would suspect painting was done at various sub-assembly levels......

Not only that, the factory that makes the primary castings would seldom if ever make the other parts - springs, bearings, hardware, brake shoes, etc.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by 7j43k on Monday, January 01, 2018 12:04 PM

It appears, thumbing through the '53 "Car Builders' Cyclopedia", that a company would sell a truck fully assembled, or in parts.  A small operation might prefer to have the whole truck delivered, being as it might be irritating to try to assemble it themselves.  I don't see the car builders, themselves, having a problem doing the assembly.  But that would explain why trucks were offered both ways.

 

Ed

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, January 01, 2018 1:32 PM

7j43k

It appears, thumbing through the '53 "Car Builders' Cyclopedia", that a company would sell a truck fully assembled, or in parts.  A small operation might prefer to have the whole truck delivered, being as it might be irritating to try to assemble it themselves.  I don't see the car builders, themselves, having a problem doing the assembly.  But that would explain why trucks were offered both ways.

 

Ed

 

But one could also assume that trucks were likely ordered for each run of cars seperately, and one could/would specify options and.......color........

I can see were a small builder, or as a maintenance item to the railroads, assembled might be prefered - but again, I'm sure there was a job spec sheet....

Sheldon

    

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Posted by 7j43k on Monday, January 01, 2018 2:06 PM

If trucks are shipped as parts kits, painting the parts before shipping would invite a lot of paint chipping, both in transit, and later, during assembly.

I asked about this two hours ago over on the steam freight car Yahoo group, where there's a lot of people who Know Things.

Only one answer, so far, from Dennis Storzec, the owner of Accurail:

 

Trucks were bought as parts, because there were umpteen sources of parts other than the basic castings. The same foundry might supply both side frames and bolsters, OR the customer may have ordered bolsters from a third party, such as Simplex. Springs aren't castings, and came from a different vendor; same with brake components. Bearings, dust guards, and journal covers were other specialties. Wheels and axles came from a different supplier yet. 

 
It was up to the builder to source all these specialties and assemble them.
 
 
 
 
Ed
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Posted by wojosa31 on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 8:43 PM

it makes sense, that trucks would be supplied as parts, with the car builder doing the assembly. 

When I attended the Car Inspection and repair training, at Holidaysburg, while with Conrail, each member of the class was required to participate in the complete breakdown and reassembly of a Ride Control truck. It was and still is a car shop function.

While there, we were shown the Gondola car assembly line, where three gondolas were in various state of assembly.  If I remember correctly, the underside of each car was painted before it was flipped. Landing the car on its trucks was the final step. The completed car was moved to a paint booth for the final painting, numbering etc. It was quite cool to watch the process.

Joe

 

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 9:13 PM

wojosa31
When I attended the Car Inspection and repair training, at Holidaysburg, while with Conrail

This should bring back some memories, Joe Yes

Enjoy, Ed

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Posted by Shock Control on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 9:30 PM

I prefer HO trucks in flat grey, because it is easier to see detail at a distance, regardless of prototype.

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