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Waldorf and Statlers Photo Of The Day!

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Posted by "JaBear" on Friday, October 06, 2017 5:42 AM
Thanks for that additional information, Ed. That CPR car would make an interesting scratch build project.
I did a little more digging but am still not sure which of these terms, “Birdcage” or “Gallery”, is the correct one, that is if either are correct!!!
 
on Flickr
 
The original “Kingston Flyer” and crew at the Kingston Railway Station. The engine is one of the famed “K” class American Rogers locomotives. A half “birdcage” carriage is visible just behind the engine tender. Photo credit: NZ Railways Publicity.
 
on Flickr
“Gallery” car, A595.

Cheers, the still confused Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by BATMAN on Sunday, November 19, 2017 11:17 AM

Here is a video of a train break. I found it interesting how it was able to stop in unison even though the front part was packing a lot more weight.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by BATMAN on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 3:25 PM

I was looking for early 1900s power equipment to place around the roundhouse I am working on. Once the PRR had them, they spread like wildfire to all railroads and other industries. I wonder how long they ran on a charge, batteries being what they were back then. A charging station for these would also be required.

Can't seem to find them produced by a MRR manufacturer, should be easy enough to build from scratch though. It's on the docket for 2026.Laugh

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 4:29 PM

Take a look at Jay Leno's Garage on Youtube, in particular the episode on his Baker electric car from right around the turn of the century. It does better than some current electric cars, the horribly pointless Mitsubishi one in particular - that one couldn't get me back and forth to work just one day. Jay's 1909 Baker goes 100 miles on a charge. Yes, using 1909 battery technology. Edison Cell Nickel-Iron batteries, to be exact - which have such long lives there are still original ones that take and hold a charge. Railroads used them a lot - you could keep them under continuous charge without killing them, and they would last at LEAST 20 years. So they powered signals and crossing gates and so forth on the railroad all over.

 Given the slow speed those baggage carts would run, they almost certainly had the same run time as a more modern electric fork lift with the big lead-acid battery packs. And Edison batteries could be charged faster than lead-acid, with no worries about hydrogen gas being given off.

 Electric cars are nothing new - in the early 1900's, they were the preferred form, gasoline cars were crude, noisy, and very unreliable in the early days. They disappeared when gasoline and the engines to burn it were cheap, and you had effectively unlimited range. The mostly DIY attempts to bring them back in the 60's and 70's were complete flops, most were poorly engineered and all they ever used were regular car batteries which were not designed for the continuous cycling of an electric car. Even the best of today, with exotic lithium ion battery chemistry, aren't all that much better range-wise as those early 1900's cars. Some, like the previously mentioned Mitsubushi, and the Nissan Leaf, are actually far worse.  Note though, that the top speed on those old cars was 20-25mph, and most driving was done going even slower, considering paved roads were a thing of the future.

                     --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by gmpullman on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 12:29 AM

rrinker
Electric cars are nothing new - in the early 1900's, they were the preferred form, gasoline cars were crude, noisy, and very unreliable in the early days.

Anyone who knows me can tell you that I frequently preach that there are truly no NEW ideas.

All this talk about hybrid cars and I'm reminded of the New York Central's tri-power DES-2 locomotive first built in 1928 as a joint effort of Alco, GE, ESB and Ingersoll-Rand.

It had 240 cell storage battery, a 300 HP diesel and a third-rail pick-up shoe. The diesel or the third rail could be used to charge the batteries‡ and it could run inside the dock and warehouse buildings, without smoke, for about three hours!

So everyone is Ooh and Aah about GEVO and hybrid locomotives!

NYC says... been there — done that.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GE_three-power_boxcab

 ‡ Two NYC books I have say the batteries COULD be charged off the third rail. The Wiki article says no? Both the generator and third rail were 600 VDC so I don't see why not but I can not confirm for sure.

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by rrinker on Wednesday, November 22, 2017 6:52 AM

 Only thing I can think of is that with the lack of high current rectification, there was probably no way to stop the batteries from feeding in to the third rail if the third rail voltage dropped, say due to other nearby locos starting a train. The diesel and generator would have no such issue since the load was consistant - charging the batteries. 

 That's as good a reason as any to keep the batteries isolated from the third rail. Much like electrified lines in mountainous areas used dynamic braking on the downhill train, feeding power back into the overhead, not wasting it in resistors, to add power to trains climbing the hills. You might sit there thinking the batteries are recharging only to find they are now completely drained and you have to start the diesel.

                                --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by BATMAN on Thursday, November 23, 2017 6:39 PM

Okay, which one of you is the kid in the car. Larry!????????

 

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by gmpullman on Thursday, November 23, 2017 9:52 PM

Forget the kid—

I want to know more about the funky two-dome tank car. Single, triple, sure. I don't recall ever seeing a two-dome?

 Tank_car_2dome by Edmund, on Flickr

Fun Stuff, Ed

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, November 23, 2017 10:16 PM

Yea, nice catch Ed.  That icing machine was awesome!  Thanks Brent!

Mike.

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Posted by "JaBear" on Friday, November 24, 2017 3:01 AM

gmpullman
I want to know more about the funky two-dome tank car. Single, triple, sure. I don't recall ever seeing a two-dome?

They certainly seem to be a rarity Ed, and that one a real oddity.

http://photobucket.com/gallery/user/Chris_Zygmunt/media/cGF0aDovVGFua2NhcnBob3RvY29weS5qcGc=/?ref=

http://berwickrailfan.webs.com/rollstockphotos/STOWNtanker0001.jpg

Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by BATMAN on Friday, November 24, 2017 11:01 AM

How about this for you loggers.

  

One of the more interesting—and unique—cars built by Seattle Car & Foundry was this tank car built for the Yosemite Lumber Company for use on a 7,800' incline with grades up to 78%. The expansion dome had to be placed at the uphill end of the car to avoid spillage, and special flanges between the tank and the frame kept the tank from slipping out of the hold-down bands. Drawings and photos of this car may be found in the May/June 2004 issue of Narrow Gauge & Short Line Gazette.

More here.

http://www.midcontinent.org/rollingstock/builders/pacific_car.htm 

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, November 24, 2017 4:53 PM

Fascinating find, Brent. An uphill tank car. Who'd a thunk it?

So after a little snooping I found another twin-domer:

 57001 by John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library, on Flickr

Fun Stuff,

Ed

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Posted by BATMAN on Saturday, November 25, 2017 4:40 PM

gmpullman
Fascinating find, Brent. An uphill tank car.

Ya, I wonder how they got it down the hill.WhistlingLaugh

I have seen one of those twin dome tank cars before and I am pretty sure it was used in the booze business, Beer, wine or is maybe bringing my Captain MorganPirate to the West Coast.

Here is another oldie, best watched on the big screen in my new power recliner.Laugh

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, November 25, 2017 6:31 PM

BATMAN
Can't seem to find them produced by a MRR manufacturer, should be easy enough to build from scratch though.

I have the same fascination for electric trucks as you, Brent. Cleveland was a mecca of electric vehicle manufacturers. Elwell-Parker, Baker, Yale, Rauch & Lang and a few more I forget.

I made a bunch of these for baggage and express handling around my Union Station. I think they're pretty neat Smile

 IMG_6285_fix2 by Edmund, on Flickr

 

 IMG_6244_fix by Edmund, on Flickr

 They are made in several styles, kit or finished:

https://www.walthers.com/electric-flatbed-vehicle-w-3-trailers-kit

https://www.walthers.com/electric-baggage-truck-nonoperating-w-trailer-driver-german-railways-early-era-iii

Have fun! Ed

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Posted by BATMAN on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 11:23 AM

Ed, those electric vehicles are really neat, thanks for the link, I will put them on my Christmas toy list.

Here is an old film from General Electric. Hard to believe they are getting out of the locomotive biz after all these years. As Randy and Ed pointed out earlier, electric seemed to be the way of the future a hundred years ago. I wonder where we would be today on this side of the pond if we had stuck with electric instead of letting the mighty dollar determine the future. High speed rail would be everywhere by now, (maybe)

Most of us own GE stock either directly or through our pension funds. I wonder what a $100.00 worth of stock in 1915 is worth today. 

Back to the future.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, December 01, 2017 9:10 AM

BATMAN
Most of us own GE stock either directly or through our pension funds. I wonder what a $100.00 worth of stock in 1915 is worth today. 

Not quite as much as you might think...

$5,538.86  [edit] I just noticed that the data I used only went back to 1962 so these numbers are fuzzy! Seems like all the databases I find only go back to '62.

Now the 5,000 shares I bought about a year ago at $30.53? Crying

Easy come, easy go they say Big Smile

Now if you want something reliable...

 8784 002 by John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library, on Flickr

You just can't beat a "Reliable" Ham!

Cheers! Ed

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Posted by "JaBear" on Friday, December 15, 2017 3:00 AM

gmpullman
You just can't beat a "Reliable" Ham!

I wonder if an “unreliable” ham was one that was transported in an ordinary boxcar?
Warning!!!Foreign railway stuff and other bits!!
I took the following miscellany of short videos at the Steamfest that was held at my old stomping ground, Otorohanga in the King Country a couple of months back. Unfortunately, the day wasn’t the flashiest and got worse, a good excuse for my lousy video skills.
Still her-in-doors and I had a great time, and are definitely intending to be there next year.
 
 

 

Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, December 15, 2017 3:38 AM

I wonder if an “unreliable” ham was one that was transported in an ordinary boxcar?

At our house, the unreliable ham was the one that showed up as dessert was being served Dinner

Love the calliope! I could listen to that all day Yes 

Smile, Wink & Grin

 

Ed

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Posted by NWP SWP on Friday, December 22, 2017 6:11 PM

This post was originally posted in the General Discussion "Show Me Something" thread...

I love big locos so here's some...

That is an A-B-A set of DD35s 

Followed by...

A-B-A U50s

But wait there's more!

Four DDA40Xs and a GP40

And more!

An A-B-A set of C855s...

(Don't ask me why the A units a long hood first!)

And here's some more!

Another A-B-B-A set of two GP35s, two DD35s, and a test car from an old F unit...

More still!

The UP coal turbine!

A few more!

GN W-1s whose running gear was used for the UP coal turbine...

Some more!

N&Ws Jawn Henry steam turbine electric...

Four left...

A Pennsy E2C electric...

Three left!

Two Centipedes on Horseshoe Curve...

Two left!

Virginian EL-2Bs

Last but not least!

Illinois Centrals Center Cab Transfer Diesel...

Or...

That's all folks!

P.S. this isn't rail related but goes in sync with the that's all folks above...

AND this IS rail related...

The PeaceKeeper Rail Garrison boxcar...

I'll let some others post for a while! That's all for now...

Steven

Crooner, Imagineer, High School Senior, living with Aspergers, and President of the NWP-SWP System.

Modeling the combined lines of the Southern Pacific, Western Pacific, and Northern Pacific after a fictional Depression Era merger forming the SouthWestern Pacific and NorthWestern Pacific Railroads. SP, WP, and NP operations remain independent but also operate alongside NWP and SWP equipment.

Hook'em Longhorns! 

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, December 23, 2017 3:47 PM

A little bit of EMD ephemera...

 RPO_EMD by Edmund, on Flickr

Those were the days...

Ed

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Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, December 24, 2017 2:08 AM

Browsing the ever popular YouTube...

Pure History! Fox Movietone outtakes of New York Central's Commodore Vanderbilt and other history of the 5344 —

 

 

Never to be repeated in history...

Enjoy, Ed

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Posted by NWP SWP on Sunday, December 24, 2017 4:26 PM

Here's some NYC posters I stumbled across...

Steven

Crooner, Imagineer, High School Senior, living with Aspergers, and President of the NWP-SWP System.

Modeling the combined lines of the Southern Pacific, Western Pacific, and Northern Pacific after a fictional Depression Era merger forming the SouthWestern Pacific and NorthWestern Pacific Railroads. SP, WP, and NP operations remain independent but also operate alongside NWP and SWP equipment.

Hook'em Longhorns! 

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Posted by BATMAN on Sunday, December 31, 2017 12:55 AM

Hot off the press.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by BATMAN on Friday, January 05, 2018 11:11 AM

Not your typical day in the cab.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by BATMAN on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:22 PM

Well, the soundtrack is to die for.

Get your popcorn and watch out for Larry (Brakie) Switching in the Toledo yard.

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by snjroy on Thursday, January 11, 2018 7:18 AM

- awesome!

Simon

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Posted by BATMAN on Thursday, January 11, 2018 7:26 PM

I wonder if they ever set that old wooden railcar on fire.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by BATMAN on Friday, January 12, 2018 11:23 AM

First one to spot a little Lion gets a free bag of popcorn.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by BATMAN on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 10:40 AM

A cool collection of shots. 

There is a train washer in some shots. I suggested to Rapido, they make a train washer using the steam technology from their "oh so steamy steam car",  They didn't think it was a very good idea.Laugh

At one point there is a very wimpy looking bridge going over the tracks. If I saw that on a layout I would think it was really underbuilt. Must be for light transit rail.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1

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Posted by BATMAN on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 9:26 PM

Holy lash up.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1

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