Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Typical Broadway Limited consist for 1950

5436 views
13 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Philadelphia PA
  • 76 posts
Typical Broadway Limited consist for 1950
Posted by j1love on Thursday, October 15, 2009 7:30 PM

I was wondering what would be the typical consist for the Broadway Limited.  I recently purchased the rivarossi passenger set in HO scale and it occured to me that most of the cars in the prototype passenger set were probably sleepers and diners as opposed to coaches. What I would love to know is how many??  I would also like to know how the cars were put together (Head end, RPO, Baggage, etc.....)  Does anyone out there have this info?  Thanks in advance.

Jim Davis Jr Pennsy, then, Pennsy now, Pennsy Forever!!!!!!!

  • Member since
    January, 2001
  • From: US
  • 1,300 posts
Posted by Sperandeo on Friday, October 16, 2009 9:06 AM

Hello Jim,

In our October 1994 issue we had a special feature on the 1949 edition of the Broadway Limited (the train was given new equipment in that year), with foldout drawings of all the cars (the PRR cars, that is) and a story by Classic Trains editor and PRR fan Rob McGonigal. Rob included a representative Broadway consist of 1950:

(All cars run between New York and Chicago except as noted.)

RPO car

4-4-2 sleeper to and from Los Angeles

21-roomette sleeper

12-4 sleeper

4-4-2 sleeper

Sleeper-lounge

Twin-unit diner

4-4-2 sleeper

Four 10-6 sleepers

Sleeper-lounge observation

The New York-LA sleeper would be the only car not painted Tuscan Red. The Pennsy had three pre-war Imperial-series sleepers painted two-tone gray for this transcontinental service, and the Santa Fe, providing the Chicago-LA link, contributed stainless steel 4-4-2s from the pre-war Hotevilla series (named for Native American pueblos and other place names). The twin-unit diner included a dining-room car with seats for 68 and a kitchen-dormitory car with sleeping accomodations for the train's service crew. There were no coaches or chair cars, as the Broadway was "all-Pullman," sleeping accomodations only, until 1967.

If you're interested, the October 1994 back issue is available on this Web site. 

So long,

Andy
 

Andy Sperandeo MODEL RAILROADER Magazine

  • Member since
    September, 2002
  • 6,206 posts
Posted by ndbprr on Friday, October 16, 2009 10:03 AM

The Rivarossi RPO is a very close stand in for the Broadway RPO named the Robert Hannigan.  The two square end observations were Tower View and Mountain View and had  master staterooms with showers.  An 8/30/59 list of cars on one of the Broadway trains has:

unknown RPO

Imperial Vale 4-4-2

Fishing Rapids 10-6

Chartiers Creek 12-4

Imperial Lea 4-4-2

Catalpa Falls 6 br-lounge

4620 dining car

4621 kitchen dorm

Imperial Trees 4-4-2

Connestoga Rapids 10-6

Cippewa Creek 12-4

Clarion Rapids 10-6

Muskegon rapids 10-6

Mountain View 2 master br- 1 double br-lounge-obs

8/1/49 WB Broadway

GG1 4898

RPO 5239

ATSF Jadito 4-4-2

Zanesville Inn 21 roomettes

Alliance 21 roomette

Conewago Creek 12-4

Imperial Rudge 4-4-2

Harbor Rest 3 doble br-lounge

D85CR diner 4602

D85DR kitchen dorm 4603

Imperial Peak 4-4-2

Lehigh Rapids 10-6

Little Miami Rapids 10-6

Tieppecanoe Rapids 10-6

Raccoon Rapids 10-6

Mountain View 2 master br- 1 double br-obs

The ATSF car arrive Chicago via ATSF Chief train 20

9/30/48 Broadway

BP60A (Two unit Baldwin centipede diesels) 5831

RPO 5449

BD85R baggage dorm 6691

Pullman Bahama 7 comp-2 Drawing room

Pullman Elm Queen 12 roomette- 2 sing br-3 dbl br

Imperial point 4-4-2

warsaw Inn 21 rmette

Wooster Inn 21 rmettes

Wilkinsberg Inn 21 rmette

Harbor Springs 5 dbl br-lounge

D82AR diner 4512

D82AR diner 4515

Cascade Heights 10-5

Imperial Crest 4-4-2

Imperial Path 4-4-2

Hamilton County 13 dble br

New York County 13 dbl br

Metropolitan View 2 masterbr- 1 dbl br-lounge-obs

There is an excellent reference for proper models of PRR cars on the keystone crossings web site. It lists all PRR passenger cars available in HO and N gauges and if they are acurate models of PRR equipment.

 

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Philadelphia PA
  • 76 posts
Posted by j1love on Friday, October 16, 2009 7:43 PM

Thanks for the info NDPRR.  I knew about the Keystone Crossings web site, but I guess I never looked deep enough to find that information about the passenger cars and the models that represent them.  Now I can start to assemble a good representation of the Broadway Limited for Davis and Pennsylvanian RR.  One day I will post progress reports on how it is going.  Thanks again!!Thumbs Up

Jim Davis Jr Pennsy, then, Pennsy now, Pennsy Forever!!!!!!!

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Philadelphia PA
  • 76 posts
Posted by j1love on Friday, October 16, 2009 7:46 PM

Andy, as usual, YOU ROCK!!!!  I really appreciate the information and I will order that back issue!!  I could really use those foldout drawings to assemble a prototypical Broadway Limited in HO.  Thanks Smile,Wink, & Grin

Jim Davis Jr Pennsy, then, Pennsy now, Pennsy Forever!!!!!!!

  • Member since
    July, 2009
  • 236 posts
Posted by Robt. Livingston on Saturday, October 17, 2009 10:13 AM

Just in case anyone is wondering, the RPO cars assigned to the Broadway had a short baggage compartment at one end for passenger baggage. 

Earlier incarnation of the Robert Hannigan type RPO, based on the Rivarossi car.  I built up a higher arch roof, 6 wheel trucks, and porthole windows in the doors.  Baggage compartment on the right:

 

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Philadelphia PA
  • 76 posts
Posted by j1love on Saturday, October 17, 2009 12:38 PM

I always associated these type of RPO's with heavyweight equipment.  So this RPO ran with the 1950's Broadway?  I guess you never stop learning in this hobby. Thanks!!  (Your RPO is really nice Thumbs Up )

Jim Davis Jr Pennsy, then, Pennsy now, Pennsy Forever!!!!!!!

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Martinez, CA
  • 5,440 posts
Posted by markpierce on Saturday, October 17, 2009 2:03 PM

It wasn't unusual to include heavyweight headend cars in a train otherwise made up of lightweights.  The heavyweights might be repainted to help give a uniform finish to the train, sometimes with some superficial exterior modifications.

Mark

  • Member since
    July, 2009
  • 236 posts
Posted by Robt. Livingston on Saturday, October 17, 2009 4:39 PM

The RPO is in WWII era configuration, not 1950's.  I only posted it to show the typical Broadway arrangement of a long RPO and short baggage section.   It is not an exact model as it should have taller rectangular windows.  It is closest to the PRR BM70n configuration.  The PRR had a large number of RPO's of many, many different configurations, ands seemed to be constantly rebuilding them.  The original Rivarossi model represents a BM70nb, with short rectangular windows, lower arch roof and four wheel trucks.  There were fourteen of them (rebuilt 1950-53), intended for Broadway service.  They were originally built in 1910 as M70's (all RPO, no baggage), and had passed through a number of rebuilds over the years.  Some had spent a few years as B70's (all baggage, no RPO). 

Edit:
After I wrote the above, I re-read Keystone Vol. 26, No.1, which is the definitive work on PRR RPO's.  It seems my model is nearly correct for one car, Robert Hannigan, which served on the Broadway.  It was rebuilt in 1946 with short windows, but had the low arch roof, and porthole doors.  It was the only named RPO on the PRR.  Number should be 5239.  Close but no cigar. 

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Philadelphia PA
  • 76 posts
Posted by j1love on Sunday, October 18, 2009 10:44 AM

So the Riv RPO that came with the set I bought is a reasonable stand in for the 1950 Broadway.  OUTSTANDING!!!  All I have to do is replace the trucks with metal wheels, apply some Kadees and lightly weather it and I should be good to go.  Thanks to all for your replies.....I am researching the other cars listed above to see if I can make the generic sleepers and diners closer to the real prototypes listed above.  Who knows? Maybe I can get an accurate Broadway Limited of my own.....I will keep you all posted

Jim Davis Jr Pennsy, then, Pennsy now, Pennsy Forever!!!!!!!

  • Member since
    May, 2004
  • 1,792 posts
Posted by 7j43k on Sunday, October 18, 2009 2:36 PM
I preface this with a declaration that I'm not a Pennsy guy!

Of the Rivarossi cars, the following are Pennsy:

the obs

the 10-6 sleeper WITH a beltrail below the windows

the RPO

the uppy-downy sleeper (also known as a 12 duplex-five DB sleeper)

The remaining cars are UP except for the coach which I don't think has ever been nailed down. I recall someone speculating it could be KCS, but.......

Ed
  • Member since
    July, 2009
  • 236 posts
Posted by Robt. Livingston on Sunday, October 18, 2009 2:45 PM

Not only is the Rivarossi a good model of the actual PRR BM70nb as used on the Broadway 1950 and after, but you may be interested to know that it was intended to be run with the baggage end first, up against the locomotive.  The bagg end is marked by the wider door. 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Utica, OH
  • 3,325 posts
Posted by jecorbett on Sunday, October 18, 2009 4:53 PM

I have quite a collection of Rivarossi passenger equipment from various roads that I acquired during the 1980s and 1990s. I know they are generic as opposed to being road specific but I always thought they were good looking cars and with a little work could be made into good running equipment. Obviously they need more weight for their size. Interiors are a help in that regard. Since I've always run radii of 30" or greater, I would convert them to body mounted couplers. The ones I still run are given diaphrams. The wheels were probably the worst part of them. Do they still come with the oversized plastic wheels with the pizza cutter flanges?

  • Member since
    May, 2004
  • 1,792 posts
Posted by 7j43k on Sunday, October 18, 2009 11:29 PM
jecorbett

I know they are generic as opposed to being road specific...

This is true if you are referring to their being painted in many incorrect schemes; but, with the possible exception of the lightweight coach, I believe they are all models of actual cars (ie. NOT generic). For example, see my earlier comments.

Ed

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!
Popular on ModelRailroader.com
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook

Loading...