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Camelback locomotives

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Camelback locomotives
Posted by O&Whack on Friday, August 07, 2009 9:12 AM

I am looking for erection drawings of camelback locomotives either real design drawings or model drawings.  Ther are few types of this model available in the greater hobby so it looks like I have to scratch build ones for my railroad.  Scale is no problem.

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Posted by dehusman on Friday, August 07, 2009 12:25 PM

IHC sells a 2-6-0 that is a model of an O&W U-1 class 2-6-0. 

"Locomotives of the Reading and Philadelphia and Reading"  by Wisswesser has tons of pictures and diagrams of camelbacks.  Also check with the Reading Company Technical and Hisotical Society.

Dave H. Modeling the P&R and W&N 1900-1905, Iron men and wooden cars

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Posted by BerkshireSteam on Friday, August 07, 2009 1:40 PM

Mantua 0-6-0 Camelbacks. Reading, Southern, Rio Grande, ATSF, and undecorated. I may just get one to have on my rail marine roster.

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Posted by Sperandeo on Friday, August 07, 2009 4:06 PM

Hi "O&W,"

See the Model Railroader Cyclopedia, Volume 1, Steam Locomotives, available on this Web site. It includes drawings of three Camelback locomotives, a Reading 0-6-0 and 2-8-0, and a Central of New Jersey 4-6-0. Model Railroader has published other drawings of Camelback locomotives; see the online index of magazines at the bottom of this page.

Have a great weekend,

Andy 

Andy Sperandeo MODEL RAILROADER Magazine

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Posted by markpierce on Friday, August 07, 2009 7:50 PM

MILW-RODR

Mantua 0-6-0 Camelbacks. Reading, Southern, Rio Grande, ATSF, and undecorated. I may just get one to have on my rail marine roster.

I'm not aware the DRGW, ATSF, or Southern railroads had 0-6-0 Camelbacks.  Am I ignorant?

Mark

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Posted by IRONROOSTER on Friday, August 07, 2009 9:14 PM

markpierce

MILW-RODR

Mantua 0-6-0 Camelbacks. Reading, Southern, Rio Grande, ATSF, and undecorated. I may just get one to have on my rail marine roster.

I'm not aware the DRGW, ATSF, or Southern railroads had 0-6-0 Camelbacks.  Am I ignorant?

Mark

 

No, the Southern one is a fake.  Real Southern Camelbacks are painted green.Smile,Wink, & Grin

Enjoy

Paul

If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
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Posted by twhite on Sunday, August 09, 2009 5:35 PM

IRONROOSTER

markpierce

MILW-RODR

Mantua 0-6-0 Camelbacks. Reading, Southern, Rio Grande, ATSF, and undecorated. I may just get one to have on my rail marine roster.

I'm not aware the DRGW, ATSF, or Southern railroads had 0-6-0 Camelbacks.  Am I ignorant?

Mark

 

No, the Southern one is a fake.  Real Southern Camelbacks are painted green.Smile,Wink, & Grin

Enjoy

Paul

Yah, and the Rio Grande ones all had front-hung air pumps on the smokebox door and 'eyebrow' Elesco feedwater heaters.  Tongue

Tom Big Smile

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Posted by markpierce on Sunday, August 09, 2009 6:08 PM

twhite

Yah, and the Rio Grande ones all had front-hung air pumps on the smokebox door and 'eyebrow' Elesco feedwater heaters.  Tongue

Tom Big Smile

Yeah!  I surely would like to see that, especially something in the 0-6-6-0 persuasion! (or am I confusing that with an 0-8-8-0 Camelback?).  Mischief

Mark

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Posted by markpierce on Sunday, August 09, 2009 6:18 PM

markpierce

twhite

Yah, and the Rio Grande ones all had front-hung air pumps on the smokebox door and 'eyebrow' Elesco feedwater heaters.  Tongue

Tom Big Smile

Yeah!  I surely would like to see that, especially something in the 0-6-6-0 persuasion! (or am I confusing that with an 0-8-8-0 Camelback?).  Mischief

Yes, I was confusing it with an 0-8-8-0.  Erie's L-1 class locomotive was the only articulated Camelback locomotive.

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Posted by O&Whack on Monday, August 10, 2009 7:26 AM

Thanks for the leads

 

 

The IHC is out of 2-6-0 camelbacks that is what started this search

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Posted by O&Whack on Monday, August 10, 2009 7:28 AM

The 0-6-0 is a copy of the Reading's although stylized.  But , thanks for the info.

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Posted by O&Whack on Monday, August 10, 2009 7:29 AM

Thank you for the lead

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Posted by richg1998 on Saturday, August 15, 2009 2:32 PM

 To my knowledge, this is the first Camelback. Many at the time, 1850, called it a Camel. Note the "hump".

Rich

Some heard Trains when brains were handed out and have been on the wrong track ever since.

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Posted by dehusman on Saturday, August 15, 2009 6:01 PM

It is a "camel" but not a "camelback".  Two different designs.

The first camelback was the P&R 412, a conventional cab, Wooten firebox 4-6-0.  It went on a demonstration tour of Italy, but was too tall to fit through the tunnels.  So the engineer cut the cab off the back of the firebox top and mounted it over the boiler.

Holton's history of the Reading has a portion of a chapter devoted to it.

 

Dave H. Modeling the P&R and W&N 1900-1905, Iron men and wooden cars

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Posted by richg1998 on Saturday, August 15, 2009 7:05 PM

dehusman

It is a "camel" but not a "camelback".  Two different designs.

The first camelback was the P&R 412, a conventional cab, Wooten firebox 4-6-0.  It went on a demonstration tour of Italy, but was too tall to fit through the tunnels.  So the engineer cut the cab off the back of the firebox top and mounted it over the boiler.

Holton's history of the Reading has a portion of a chapter devoted to it.

 

 

Yes, I know that but there are people who do use the Camelback terminology for the Winans Camel that is why I mentioned it. I have a lot of data concerning the Camel as it is a loco that has interested me for some time.

Rich

Some heard Trains when brains were handed out and have been on the wrong track ever since.

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Posted by rs2mike on Sunday, August 16, 2009 9:24 AM

I hate to say it for all the ebay haters but they do come up fairly often.  I got a never used one at a very good price.  Runs nice and smooth and very slow if need be.  Only problem I have with it is that I have not been able to get it opened up to put a decoder in it.  I like it but I think I might sell it at some point and buy a shay instead.

Good luck

alco's forever!!!!! Majoring in HO scale Minorig in O scale:)

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Posted by P5se Camelback on Saturday, June 05, 2010 4:07 PM
MILW-RODR

Mantua 0-6-0 Camelbacks. Reading, Southern, Rio Grande, ATSF, and undecorated. I may just get one to have on my rail marine roster.

Please note that some model manufacturers will letter a new product for roads that never had a locomotive or a freight car of the type advertised. Almost anything will be lettered "Pennsylvania" or "Santa Fe" and lately there are a number of other roads that they've decided to letter stuff up for. The Reading (RDG), Jersey Central (CNJ), Lehigh Valley (LV), New York,Ontario & Western (O&W) and a few other roads, primarily in the northeast had Camelbacks. [They were developed to burn anthracite and needed the wide grate area to develop enough heat to build up steam from a shallow fire.] To the best of my knowledge, the only road in the western part of the country that had Camelbacks would be the UP, which had one or two small Camelback Americans built by Rogers in the late 1800's. Do your homework about your prototype if you arre interested in being "true" to the road you are modeling ... otherwise, have at it and enjoy yourself! The Wisswesser book and the Cyclopedia, both of which are referred to earlier in this thread, are excellent reference books. I believe "blueprints" may still be available from either Mr. Wisswesser or the Reading Railroad Historical Society. Keep an eye out on EBay if you really want a nice brass Camelback! They do come up for auction from time to time, but again, do your homework as to price/value as sometimes bidding can get out of hand! However, occasionally, one slips in and out almost unnoticed! But you must watch! But first and foremost ... have fun model railroading!

BiL Marsland (P5se Camelback)
Lehigh Susquehanna & Western
Northeastern Pennsylvania Coal Hauler
All Camelback Steam Roster!!

"All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others" -- George Orwell, Animal Farm, Chpt. 10

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Posted by markpierce on Saturday, June 05, 2010 4:19 PM

P5se Camelback

... To the best of my knowledge, the only road in the western part of the country that had Camelbacks would be the UP, which had one or two small Camelback Americans built by Rogers in the late 1800's. .

The Southern Pacific Railroad had one Camelback, a 4-6-0 purchased soon after 1900.  Within a short time, it was rebuilt as a conventional cab-in-the-back locomotive.

Mark

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Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, June 05, 2010 7:32 PM

The CNR, too, owned a Camelback 2-8-0, although for only a short period of time.  Acquired in 1929 as part of the Quebec Montreal & Southern, it was scrapped in 1930. (The QM&S was part of the D&H's line on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River.)

Wayne

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Posted by P5se Camelback on Monday, June 07, 2010 12:33 PM
Thanks, you two ... I stand (sit) corrected! I knew that 98.7% of all Camelback-heavy Motive Power Rosters were in the Northeast in general, and most of those plied the rails in the Anthracite coal country of Northeast Pennsylvania. I was aware of the odd (for their home road) Camelback or three out "West," but not of the one in Canada. I was under the impression that they were primarily experiments for their owners and were either converted to conventional rear cab or scrapped after a relatively short period of service.

BiL Marsland (P5se Camelback)
Lehigh Susquehanna & Western
Northeastern Pennsylvania Coal Hauler
All Camelback Steam Roster!!

"All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others" -- George Orwell, Animal Farm, Chpt. 10

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Posted by THE.RR on Wednesday, June 09, 2010 10:46 PM

twhite

IRONROOSTER

markpierce

MILW-RODR

Mantua 0-6-0 Camelbacks. Reading, Southern, Rio Grande, ATSF, and undecorated. I may just get one to have on my rail marine roster.

I'm not aware the DRGW, ATSF, or Southern railroads had 0-6-0 Camelbacks.  Am I ignorant?

Mark

 

No, the Southern one is a fake.  Real Southern Camelbacks are painted green.Smile,Wink, & Grin

Enjoy

Paul

Yah, and the Rio Grande ones all had front-hung air pumps on the smokebox door and 'eyebrow' Elesco feedwater heaters.  Tongue

Tom Big Smile

Just for the record, the Santa Fe DID have a for real camelback.  A 4-4-2 #738, built in 1889, the 2nd    4-4-2 ever built according to Worley (photo on p 233).  The Santa Fe didn't like it for a number of reasons, and by 1892 it was rebuilt to a conventional cab 4-4-0.

Phil

Timber Head Eastern Railroad "THE Railroad Through the Sierras"

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Posted by hardcoalcase on Saturday, June 12, 2010 9:18 PM

Here are some of the camelback plans that have appeared in model train mags:

Erie camelback articulated, (0-8-8-0, L-1, simplistic plans), RMC February 1955, p. 22 Photo at: http://www.mrmuffinstrains.com/TrainPictures/Prototype%20Erie2601.jpg

Reading camelback 2-8-0 Class I8sa, Baldwin 1905, MR June 1972, p. 56

Reading 0-4-0 switcher, A4a (4 wheel tender) and A4b (8 wheel tender), MR July 1974, p. 56

Photo – A5 0-4-0 http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/rdg/rdg-s1159o.jpg

Lehigh Valley’s 2-8-2 Camelbacks, plans and photos, MR, February, 1979, p. 89

Reading Camelback Americans, Class D-8c, circa 1911, MR, December 1982, p. 102.

Lehigh Valley Camelback Pacific and Mikado, (simple add-ons to Mantua camelbacks), MR, August 1984, p. 68

Reading RR Atlantics, (circa 1905), MR, February 1988, p. 89

Philadelphia & Reading 4-4-0 of the 1890s, info and plans, MR, April 1992, p. 93

Jim

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Posted by danmerkel on Friday, June 18, 2010 6:23 AM

The Wheeling & Lake Erie had three Camelback locos.  They were eventually converted to "normal" cab in the rear engines.

A long time ago, I purchased some drawings of camels from the Reading Historical Society.  It had to have been 25-30 years ago; I don't know if they still have them or not.

dlm

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