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loading device - my Model Railroad Dictionary 1

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loading device - my Model Railroad Dictionary 1
Posted by BN7150 on Sunday, February 23, 2020 11:49 PM

Currently I am creating a dictionary for Japanese fans. Thanks for your advice.

[loading device] generally refers to a machine that "loads." See [loader].

In box cars and reefers, it refers to equipment that prevents cargo from collapsing, and is also called "loader device" or "load retainer."

door signs

The figure (quoted partly from page 131 of the Walthers Decal Catalog 1985 edition) shows the identification mark of these devices established by AAR. Side door surface or at its left(?), will be displayed. There are three main types of systems: Movable Bulkheads, Removable Cross Members that can be inserted into both inner surfaces, and Lading Strap Anchors, mooring devices for ropes and belts. Lading strap anchors are frequently used in combination with the former two. It is thought that these marks began to be used around 1954, and around 1962 two horizontal bars and two vertical bars were added to the keyhole pattern. In addition, the movable partition has an air type (see [Air Pak]), and the ones that fills the side gap are called side fillers.

In the 1950s and 1960s, it was popular to display device initials such as FD, LD and SL on the car sides. See the blog post of TransPacific R.R.

In the past, wooden rods were nailed to wooden inner walls and floors to prevent collapse. With the spread of these equipment, exterior posts were adopted from the late 1960s, and the inner wall was exposed to  flat steel plates, and nailable structure that could be nailed to the steel floor was used was adopted. 

Related terms: [Damage Free] [lading strap anchor] [Compartmentizer] [Load Divider] [Stage Loading] [Car-Pac] [STB] [cushion underframe] [side filler] [exterior post] [waffle side] [nailable floor] [impact car].

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Posted by BN7150 on Monday, February 24, 2020 12:15 AM

[Damage Free] is said to be "DF" which is Evans' brand for loading devices, which are equipment for preventing collapse of cargo such as box cars. "DF" is a removable cross member system developed in 1950 (?), and "DF-2" is an improved version. "DF-B" is a movable bulkhead system (see photo). A large logo on the side of the car was seen from the 1950s to the 1970s, and was generally equipped with a cushion underframe. See page 44 of the RMJ March 1990 issue and the blog post of TransPacific R.R.

In addition, it seems that Evans itself did not establish those logos, and the design differs depending on the railway. For keyhole-like marks, see [loading device].

"DF" is also short for "Dunnage Free." "Dunnage" means buffer material.

Related terms: [cushion underframe] [loading device] [Evans].

Evans Products Company's ad
Car & Locomotive Cyclopedia 1966 edition

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Posted by BN7150 on Monday, February 24, 2020 12:42 AM

[Compartmentizer] is a movable bulkhead type loading device system for box cars and reefers developed by Pullman-Standard. The adoption of WP in 1951 is said to be the first. It was also installed on cars manufactured by other manufacturers. See Western Pacific R.R.Historical Society's HP, Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 9, page 10 of the Trains June 1951 issue and page 59 of the Trains March 1952 issue, page 419 of the Car Builders' Cyclopedia 1953 (quote photo), page 196 of the Car Builders' Cyclopedia 1957 edition, US patent (Google) and TransPacific R.R.

P-S Compartmentizer

Related terms: [loading device] [cushion underframe].




InterMountain O-scale model

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Posted by BN7150 on Monday, February 24, 2020 1:00 AM

[lading strap anchor] means cargo mooring bracket. It is a kind of loading device that appeared around 1950, and the car-side symbol was probably drawn in 1954. Patent applications were filed by AC & F in 1949, Illinois Railway Equipment Co. in 1951Youngtown Steel Door in 1951, and Pullman-Standard in 1952. (Under investigation)

Related term: [loading device].

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, February 24, 2020 7:49 AM

Very interesting material, BN7150.

Thank you!

Mike.

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Posted by BATMAN on Monday, February 24, 2020 11:26 AM

Thanks, BN7150, good stuff.Yes

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, February 24, 2020 11:29 AM

I just had to look up the real BN 1750, couldn't resist. Laugh  It's an SD40-2, stripes on the nose, last picture I found was dated year 2000, and NO ditch lights! 

Now I feel better about some of my locos NOT having ditch lights. Laugh

Mike.

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Posted by BN7150 on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 11:53 AM

[Load Divider] is a brand name of movable bulkhead system among the loading devices installed in box cars and reefers. There were two. Preco and Union Asbestos & Rubber's Equipco division released separately those around 1960. Both were drawn with "LD" on the car side untill the early 1970s. The photos of PRR and PFE cars are the former, and the latter is the mark that encloses "LD" in parentheses of the B&O car photo. Competing products of Evans' DF-B and P-S's Compartmentizer. See page 412 and 420-421 of the Car Builders' Cyclopedia 1961 edition. 

Related terms: [loading device] [Damage Free] [Compartmentizer].

 

[Stage Loading] is a brand of removable cross members among the loading devices installed in box cars and reefers. Transco (Transportation Specialties Co.) released it around 1960(?). "SL" was written on the car sides. Competing product with Evans' DF or DF-2. See page 418 of the Car Builders' Cyclopedia 1961 edition. (during detailed survey)

ATSF Super Shock Control
The door sign for this model is considered incorrect.

Related terms: [loading device] [Damage Free].

 

[Car-Pac] is a removable cross member system of loading device for box cars etc. It was released by PC&F around 1960(?). "CP" was displayed on the car sides. See page 436 of the Car Builders' Cyclopedia 1961 edition.

PC&F Car-pac
Both door signs for this model are considered incorrect.

Related terms: [Loading device] [Damage Free].

 

[Air Pak] is an Evans brand developed in the late 1960s, which increases the thickness of the movable bulkhead loading device by pneumatic pressure. There were "Single" and "Dual." See a blog post of "TransPacific R.R."
USLX455 Air-Pak by Evans Products

"Air-Bag" is used for PC&F's beer cars and has an air reservoir under the floor. (Under investigation)

Related terms: [Loading device] [Evans].
Evans Air Pak bulkhead loading device
Page S3-208 of the Car and Locomotive Cyclopedia 1974 edition

 

[DF], [DF-2], [DF-B] See [Damage Free].

[LD] See [Load Divider].

[SL] See [Stage Loading].

[CP] See [Car-Pac].

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Posted by BN7150 on Thursday, February 27, 2020 12:07 AM

[impact car] is also called "impact test car". This is a box car that has transparent plates on one side, and is used to study or educate about the collapse of cargo during switching work. It is also called "transparent car" because of its transparency, and "plexiglas car" because of the acrylic resin used. First introduced by UP in 1952 (photo: quote from page 443 of the Car Builders' Cyclopedia 1953 edition). It was also built on ATSF, SP, Frisco, CN and the Japanese National Railways. Since then, they have led to the spread of loading devices and cushion underframes.
Union Pacific Plexiglas car, impact car

John Allen wrote an article on the impact car model in the MR Oct. 1962 issue (page 57-59). It used a steel ball, and was commercialized by Walthers in 1979 (photo: page 41 of the MR Sept. 1979 isssue).
Walthers impact test car released in 1979

See UtahRails.net and TransPacific Railroad.

Related terms: [loading device] [acrylic resin] [Plexiglas].

Kuriu, Kotaro
Kyoto, JAPAN

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, February 27, 2020 6:33 AM

I remember seeing that ad and car, and my first thought then was ...."What tha....?

All great info you are providing BN, thanks!

I can proudly state that NONE of my rail customers have complained about any damaged mechandise.........Smile, Wink & Grin....I have people for that.....Pirate

Mike.

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Posted by csxns on Thursday, February 27, 2020 3:26 PM

BN7150
John Allen wrote an article on the impact car model in the MR Oct. 1962 issue (page 57-59). It used a steel ball, and was commercialized by Walthers in 1979 (photo: page 41 of the MR Sept. 1979

I have one and a Jail Box that came out about the same time.

Russell

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