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The Ubiquitous Dockside Switcher

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The Ubiquitous Dockside Switcher
Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 14, 2020 10:18 AM

The Ubiquitous Dockside Switcher


Interesting history piece on the B&O dockside switchers I just ran across

http://hotraincollector.com/the-little-engine-that-could-the-ubiquitous-dockside-switcher/

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Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 14, 2020 10:22 AM

0-4-0 in Naval yard in Maine

Having been associated with the Navy in my past, I still get several publications of theirs. This photo of a small steam switcher attending a drydocked submarine in the 2020 Feb issue of the Naval Institute Proceedings caught my attention,...appears to be a 'docksider'....

 

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Posted by rrinker on Friday, February 14, 2020 10:04 PM

In the sense that it's working alongside a dock... but that's not the same loco.Cab is longer with no fuel bunker behind it, Boiler/water tank is much smaller diameter, among other noticeable differences with the C-16.

                                        --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by BigJim on Friday, February 14, 2020 10:39 PM

Brian,
I am curious as to what the caption said about the picture with the subs?

.

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Posted by railandsail on Monday, February 17, 2020 11:13 PM

Here you go BigJim, hope it comes out OK

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Posted by railandsail on Monday, February 17, 2020 11:34 PM

rrinker
In the sense that it's working alongside a dock... but that's not the same loco.Cab is longer with no fuel bunker behind it

Perhaps in that colder climate up in Maine, they enclosed the fuel bunker within the extended cab?

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Posted by BRAKIE on Tuesday, February 18, 2020 4:40 AM

railandsail
Perhaps in that colder climate up in Maine, they enclosed the fuel bunker within the extended cab?

Or it could be a fireless 0-4-0.. The crew would fill the saddle tanks with steam from a boiler house or steam stand. 

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

“Shut one’s eyes tight or open one’s arms wide, either way, one’s a fool.” Flemeth-the witch of the Wilds.
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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, February 18, 2020 12:09 PM

How about an alternative drive system arrangement for these docksiders,...motor and gears??

on another subject thread,...http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/88/t/189515.aspx

I'm wondering if one of these motorized trucks might make a kitbash drive for these small docksider locos,...afterall it appears they are quite compact, and often have BOTH axles powered??

http://arumo.a.la9.jp/r0123.htm

....

 

Darth Santa Fe

 

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Posted by Wolf359 on Tuesday, February 18, 2020 1:14 PM

railandsail

 

 
rrinker
In the sense that it's working alongside a dock... but that's not the same loco.Cab is longer with no fuel bunker behind it

 

Perhaps in that colder climate up in Maine, they enclosed the fuel bunker within the extended cab?

 

I think this is indeed the case. Because if you zoom in close on the photo, you can see that the loco has a smokestack with smoke coming out of it, and the loco also has cylinders with side rods on the wheels. I think it's probably an oil-burner with a bunker embeded in the rear cab wall.

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Posted by OT Dean on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 12:17 AM

Wolf359

 

 
railandsail

 

 
rrinker
In the sense that it's working alongside a dock... but that's not the same loco.Cab is longer with no fuel bunker behind it

 

Perhaps in that colder climate up in Maine, they enclosed the fuel bunker within the extended cab?

 

 

 

I think this is indeed the case. Because if you zoom in close on the photo, you can see that the loco has a smokestack with smoke coming out of it, and the loco also has cylinders with side rods on the wheels. I think it's probably an oil-burner with a bunker embeded in the rear cab wall.

 

That makes sense, since the navy started burning fuel oil, including what railroads called "Bunker C," in its boilers in 1910.

Deano

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