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Roof Ventilators on Engine Service Structures

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  • Member since
    December 2010
  • From: Portland, Oregon
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Roof Ventilators on Engine Service Structures
Posted by Attuvian on Thursday, February 6, 2020 12:07 AM

Gotta finish off a project for an open-sided shelter over an engine service/inspection pit.  Era is, oh, mid-60s.

What kind of roof ventilators would one expect to find on such a structure?  Is anything produced as a detail part that might do (rather than something that needs to be fabricated)?

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Duluth, MN
  • 368 posts
Posted by OT Dean on Thursday, February 6, 2020 12:46 AM

Attuvian

Gotta finish off a project for an open-sided shelter over an engine service/inspection pit.  Era is, oh, mid-60s.

What kind of roof ventilators would one expect to find on such a structure?  Is anything produced as a detail part that might do (rather than something that needs to be fabricated)?

Thanks,

John

 

Since it's open-sided, it wouldn't have to be much; probably a cupola with louvered slats, like they used to use on barns and enginehouses in the old days.  I was lucky: I wanted a couple of them but didn't want to build 'em myself because even using ESM styrene strips it would be a lot of fiddlin'.  I hunted for months and finally found them, made with a 3D printer by a company called "Rusty Stump."  They were wonderful and he sold them in pairs, with or without flagpoles, in O scale (thank goodness, since that's my scale), HO--and maybe even N.  I bought a pair without flagpoles and they were worth the price, which was in the 'teens--20 bucks or so with the shipping.  Unfortunately, like a lot of other "Basement Operators," he wanted to retire and closed up shop.  (When I was in HO, I planned to build some fancy cupola vents for a roundhouse, using ESM clapboard siding, inspired by a kit my brother assmbled in the '50s.  Milled wood siding would work just as well, if that's your medium.)  I hope some of the HO guys out there will be able to help you.  Good luck!

Deano

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  • From: Portland, Oregon
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Posted by Attuvian on Thursday, February 6, 2020 1:04 AM

OT Dean
. . . . I bought a pair without flagpoles and they were worth the price, which was in the 'teens--20 bucks or so with the shipping. . . .  

Deano

 
Thanks, Deano.  Can you post a picture of them - or is the building on which you installed them long gone?
 
John
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
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Posted by doctorwayne on Thursday, February 6, 2020 1:31 AM

If the structure is open-sided, it might have a cupola, but it might not need even that.

For the small roundhouse on the upper level of my layout, I added smoke hoods in the roof framework, with exhaust stacks on the roof.  It's implied that each hood has a blower fan, but I didn't bother modelling them, nor much other interior detail, either...

In all the steel mills in which I worked, locomotives ran in and out of the buildings constantly, and with the heavy trains, were almost always working hard. 
Even if they had been steam locomotives, I doubt that many would have noticed much difference in the air quality.

We generally preferred to work on cloudy days, as the dirt and steel dust were harder to see - on sunny days, the air literally glinted with the floating particles.

I used Evergreen clapboard siding to build the ice house at Lowbanks, and also used it for the rooftop ventilators, as Deano mentioned...

Wayne

 

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  • From: Duluth, MN
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Posted by OT Dean on Friday, February 7, 2020 12:49 AM

Attuvian
I refuse to add anymore complications to my internet connections, so no photos, but Wayne's are like the one I put on an HO icehouse, long ago.  (The Rusty Stump castings were a little fancier, with the vents inset framed into built up walls.)  Using ESM styrene or Northeastern wood 1/16" clapboard siding for the slats will be quick, easy, and look good, as you can see.  Have fun!

Deano

 

 
OT Dean
. . . . I bought a pair without flagpoles and they were worth the price, which was in the 'teens--20 bucks or so with the shipping. . . .  

Deano

 

 

 
Thanks, Deano.  Can you post a picture of them - or is the building on which you installed them long gone?
 
John
 

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Posted by NVSRR on Friday, February 7, 2020 9:03 AM

I wouls start by looking at prototype engine facilities.  When was it built?  Was it up graded?  What RR's owned it?  All play a roll in how those vents look and are set up.   After doing the google bing thing,  go into the hobby and see what is there.  Dont forget regular roof vents as they might fit the "close enough" bill.   Newer upgraded vents are just square duct.  So kitbash and scratch might be simple as well.   All depending on what the vent looks like.  

A pessimist sees a dark tunnel

An optimist sees the light at the end of the tunnel

A realist sees a frieght train

An engineer sees three idiots standing on the tracks stairing blankly in space

  • Member since
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  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, February 7, 2020 8:51 PM

A couple of photos here of a modern facility:

https://railshine.com/en/products/locomotive-fuelling-service-station/

Cheers, Ed

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