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EMD Model 40

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  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
  • 1,142 posts
EMD Model 40
Posted by FRRYKid on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 9:53 PM

Yet another one for the forums: When were the EMD Model 40s first released? A wild hare struck me about buying one and just curious if it would be used in the era I model. As usual Thank you for any assistance that can be provided.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
  • Member since
    May, 2010
  • 2,087 posts
Posted by mbinsewi on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 9:57 PM

Check this out:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMD_Model_40

It's a place to start.

Dave, hon30critter, could probably tell you all about them.

Mike.

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
  • 1,142 posts
Posted by FRRYKid on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 10:09 PM

That actually answers my questions. Thank you for your assistance.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
  • Member since
    March, 2011
  • 344 posts
Posted by NVSRR on Friday, December 22, 2017 6:45 AM

I had read a few years ago that there was one in florida still in use.   Might not be the case now.  

Wolfie

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Omaha, NE
  • 8,973 posts
Posted by dehusman on Friday, December 22, 2017 8:42 AM

There is a dormant model 40 at the Martindale Feed Mill in Valley View, TX, visible off I-45 (exit 487).  Its at the far south end of the spur.  You can even see it on the Google satellite view.

Map

Dave H. Painted side goes up.

  • Member since
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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, December 22, 2017 1:09 PM

NVSRR
I had read a few years ago that there was one in florida still in use.

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I don't know if it is the same one you are referring to, but there was a Model 40 running in a phosphate mine north of Ocala, FL as late as 1989.

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I worked for General Engine & Equipment Co. at the time, the Industrial Distributor for 2 cycle Detroit Diesels on the West Coast of Florida. This was just before Penske bought Detroit Diesel, and I went to work for Cummins.

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Anyway, that little locomotive was a special kind of miserable. The noise that 2 naturally apsirated 6-71 diesels make is something very few people will ever be exposed to again. One of the benefits of going to work at Cummins was the fact I would never need to see that thing again. No recording of a 6-71 (or worse, a 6V-53) will ever sound as aggravating as being there in person.

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I don't know how they ever kept an employee to operate it.

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • 349 posts
Posted by sandusky on Friday, December 22, 2017 1:21 PM
I hope the hare was not injured...
  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 23,371 posts
Posted by rrinker on Thursday, December 28, 2017 12:43 PM

 Oh come now, Detroits don;t sound that bad. Back when I was in my teens, I helped my neighbor ovr the summer with his trucking business. He bought an old Freightliner cabover that had a Detroit in it, I remember when we first got intot he motor to clean everything up, the rather odd arrangment of valves threw him, but it was actually through my railroad hobby I knew it was a 2 stroke motor and how it worked.  All the other trucks in his fleet has Cummins engines.

                                       --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 1,328 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, January 01, 2018 10:23 AM

rrinker
Oh come now, Detroits don;t sound that bad. Back when I was in my teens, I helped my neighbor ovr the summer with his trucking business.

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Two stroke Detroit Diesels in trucks were almost always turbocharged, which changed the engine noise quite a bit. Most people also never hear a truck engine operate under full load in the open, unless you run the vehicle on a dynomometer. Over the road truck cabs are pretty well insulated for driver comfort compared to industrial equipment.

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In industrial applications these engines were almost always naturally aspirated, and industrial engines also have a duty cycle that is under full load nearly all the time. Most trucks only peak at full rated output during accelleration or hard grade pulls.

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The term "naturally aspirated" is confusing for Detroit Diesels because in "naturally aspirated" configuration they still required a roots type blower to supply air pressure to the air box in the block.

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Without the turbocharger dampening the intake and exhaust tone caused by the gear driven blower, they make a screaming noise under load that sounds like a million plates of glass breaking at once.

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United States Sugar in Clewiston ran hundreds of M.R.S. tractors with 4-71 naturally asprirated engines into the 1990s. When several of these would run by towing "3 up" loaded cane bins, you would get a headache that would last for days.

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Yes, they did sound that bad, and that Model 40 was one of the worst!

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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