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Amtrak NE corridor electrified section

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  • Member since
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  • From: Ridgeville,South Carolina
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Amtrak NE corridor electrified section
Posted by willy6 on Friday, November 24, 2017 10:16 AM

Where does the electrified NE corridor Amtrak section start and end (city / state) and does Amtrak generate the power or is it bought from local power companies?

trains
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Posted by BigDaddy on Friday, November 24, 2017 3:34 PM

Washington D.C. to New Haven, CT  Boston, oops, back to geography 101

To my surprise, they generate their own power.  Lots of info on the web and Wiki.

 

 
 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, November 24, 2017 4:39 PM

Henry has good advice to look at Wikipedia for detailed history and explanation.

The New Haven, CT to Boston, MA section is a 60Hz supply and was not completed until January of 2000. Prior to this all trains from New Haven to Boston had to be diesel powered.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amtrak%27s_60_Hz_traction_power_system

The Pennsylvania Railroad began looking into electric traction as early as 1910, as well as New Haven and New York Central due to New York City laws enacted for both safety (for the long underground runs) and smoke abatement. At the time 25 Hz current was the prefered frequency for electrified railroads as the rotary converters operated better with the lower frequency.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amtrak%27s_25_Hz_traction_power_system

There used to be considerably more electrified trackage under PRR and Penn-Central but these freight-only lines have either been abandoned or the catenary removed.

Amtrak also operates an electrified leg from Philadelphia to Harrisburg, PA.

Good Luck,

Ed

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Posted by joe323 on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 7:46 AM

The corridor from NYC to Albany mostly MTA metro north is also electrified.  When I was on The Lake Shore Limited last month I noticed using Waze that the train was able at times to go over 100mph.  Speeds from Albany west were much slower I think because of the diesel and because the track mostly owned by NS and CSX is designed for slower freight train.  Its also noticeably bumpier.  Maybe more track joints?

Joe Staten Island West 

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Posted by davidmurray on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 3:41 PM

joe323
Speeds from Albany west were much slower I think because of the diesel and because the track mostly owned by NS and CSX is designed for slower freight train. Its also noticeably bumpier. Maybe more track joints?

 

Joe:  Heavy freight trains, especially with multi engine lashups POUND the track and roadbed, causing the track work to become uneven, and the ride bumpy.

This the reason true high speed trains run on dedicated trackage. However this is an expensive option.

Dave

 

David Murray from Oshawa, Ontario Canada
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Posted by gmpullman on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 11:56 PM

joe323
The corridor from NYC to Albany mostly MTA metro north is also electrified.

As far as I recall the electrification on the Hudson Line still ends at Croton/Harmon. (CSX Croton-West Yard)

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hudson_Line_(Metro-North)

It has long been speculated that third-rail or catenary would be a reality, even as far as Poughkeepsie, but I don't see it happening anytime soon.

Cheers! Ed

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Posted by joe323 on Thursday, December 07, 2017 6:23 AM

 

I thought the change was in Albany but maybe its Croton Harmon In any event the train stop in Albany is longer while they add the Boston cars.

Joe Staten Island West 

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Posted by NittanyLion on Thursday, December 07, 2017 7:59 AM

The southern end of the NEC electrification wasn't DC between 1937 and 1981, meaning there was overlap with the Amtrak Era. It went across the Potomac to Alexandria VA. 

DrW
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Posted by DrW on Thursday, December 07, 2017 12:06 PM

joe323

 

I thought the change was in Albany but maybe its Croton Harmon In any event the train stop in Albany is longer while they add the Boston cars.

 

The engine change is indeed done in Albany.  Between New York and Albany a dual-mode Genesis P32AC-DM is used which can run on third-rail electric power until Croton-Harmon and then uses diesel power.

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