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Stock Car Question

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Stock Car Question
Posted by caldreamer on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 9:05 PM

I am thinkig about adding a Tyson plant to my layout.  I will be bringing in the chckens in stock cars.  When the railroads ran stock cars, were all of the stock cars o nthe train from one railorad (e.g. Santa Fe) or where they from various railroads?

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  • From: Western, MA
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Posted by richg1998 on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 9:31 PM

To my knowledge, chickens were transported by rail from about 1880 to 1960. Today broght in by truck, I use to live not far from a Tyson plant some years ago. I lived on the  Delmarva Peninsula where many chicken growers and processing plants exist.

I have a HO scale model of one, 36 ft long. Era about 1900.

One link fromm a Google search for, transporting chickens by rail.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stock_car_(rail)

No idea about different roads but a Google search might help.

Rich

N

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Posted by doctorwayne on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 10:41 PM

I recall seeing photos of a Poultry Palace car, but it wasn't a conventional stock car, as would be used for hogs or cattle.  I don't know if it was a multi-level car or one in which the chickens were in crates, similar to how they're shipped nowadays on trucks.  A conventional stock car would not likely be used, as there's only so much floor space available, even in a double-decked car.  If there are more chickens than the floor space can accommodate, the ones on the bottom will likely be suffocated.  
Lots of poultry farms in this area, and I think all of them ship only by truck.

Wayne

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Posted by DSchmitt on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 11:11 PM

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

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Posted by 7j43k on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 11:40 PM

Judging by what appears to be the very small number of poultry cars compared to cattle cars, it appears that poultry was not extensively transported by rail.

Since people clearly have been eating a lot of chicken for a long time, I suspect that almost all poultry for slaughter was gathered from nearby sources-thus not needing rail transport.

 

Ed

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Posted by Colorado Ray on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 11:46 PM

Generally chicken processing plants are know as an abattoir rather than a slaughterhouse.  Horribly nasty places in my opinion.  I've designed wastewater facilities for both abattoirs and slaughterhouses and there's no comparison.  

An interesting note about an abattoir in Raeford, NC back in the late 70s.  Since they couldn't accept dead chickens, it was imperative that the birds "lived" until they were ready to "die".  The truck receiving area had huge fans to cool the crates of chickens until they could be unloaded to prevent them from dying in the NC summer heat and humidity. I would suspect that an earlier rail unloading area would also have had the huge fans.

Ray

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Posted by DSchmitt on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 12:06 AM

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

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  • From: Bradford, Ontario
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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 1:19 AM

DSchmitt
DSchmitt wrote the following post an hour ago: Poultry truck http://www.laughlinpoultry.com/index.asp 1930's poultry truck http://www.risserspoultry.com/images/antique_truck.jpg

Don't follow too closely, especially on a motorcycle!Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaugh

Sorry,

Dave

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Posted by BRAKIE on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 5:12 AM

7j43k
Judging by what appears to be the very small number of poultry cars compared to cattle cars, it appears that poultry was not extensively transported by rail.

Ed,There's usually a chicken farm near the slaughter house so,the chickens arrives live and well..Some times the meat was shipped to processors in reefers.

Never buy a home within two miles of a chicken farm.Phew!

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

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Posted by mbinsewi on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 6:43 AM

There are a few huge chicken farms around WI., and they are with in an easy truck drive from the plant.  Tyson has a plant in Fort Atkinson, WI, with farms near by.

There have been many news stories, with the hidden videos, etc., on how the farms are told to operate, by the food compmany they are working for, but that's nother story.

The 1930's truck that DSchmitt links to, reminds me of the John Anderson song, "Chicken truck".  Laugh

Mike

 

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Posted by caldreamer on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 8:37 AM

I worked at Sharpe Army Depot outside Lathrop, CA.  There were chicken farms nearby and in the summer heat, even in the early morning hours, coming to work you coukd not breathe the smell was so bad.

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Posted by 7j43k on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 9:45 AM

I was told by a CHP officer (no I wasn't pulled over--this time) that the only thing that could legally fall off a truck was feathers and/or water.

 

Ed

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  • From: Canada, eh?
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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 6:28 PM

DSchmitt

That's the car of which I was speaking.

While chicken barns are normally pretty stinky, they're at their worst when being cleaned-out after the current batch of chickens have been shipped.
However, for the farmers, that's the smell of money. Smile, Wink & Grin

Wayne

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Posted by jlehnert on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 7:58 PM

doctorwayne

While chicken barns are normally pretty stinky, they're at their worst when being cleaned-out after the current batch of chickens have been shipped.
However, for the farmers, that's the smell of money. Smile, Wink & Grin

 

Only thing worse than a chicken coop being cleaned is one that burned down. Little old lady at the head of the street (and upwind) had a 75 ft. one. It caught fire one summer when I was growing up, and OMG! My house was real popular for a couple of days, as we were the only one with air conditioning. 

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