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Truss rod

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Truss rod
Posted by kh25 on Sunday, March 19, 2017 6:45 PM

On a boxcar what is a truss rod?

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Posted by "JaBear" on Sunday, March 19, 2017 7:23 PM

OK so this is a flat car but...

Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by kh25 on Sunday, March 19, 2017 7:32 PM

Ok thank you 

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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, March 19, 2017 9:03 PM

Bear, I think that you've misspelled "turnbuckle". Stick out tongue

I use monofilament fishing line for truss rods, and turnbuckles from either Tichy or Grandt Line.
For this modified MDC boxcar, I tied-off the end of the fishing line around a piece of scrap styrene atop the car's floor, securing it with some ca.  The line was then fed down through the first hole and across the bottom of the floor, slipping a turnbuckle onto it somewhere around mid-car, and then up into the hole near the opposite end of the car.  The line was pulled tight against the floor's underside, then fed into and down the adjacent hole, continuing in this manner until all four truss rods were complete.  The end of the line was tied-off in the same manner as was done at the start.
Next, working with the floor upside down, the line was carefully lifted and placed into the slot in each queenpost, making sure that the turnbuckles are located between their respective queenposts. While this operation tightens the truss rods considerably, I usually slip some scrap plastic between the top of the floor and the place where the line crosses to the next hole, as shown here...

There's no need to apply ca at these intermediate points, as you may, if the line becomes somewhat slack over time, wish to insert more material to re-tighten them.
The turnbuckles can now be moved to about the mid-point of the truss rods, and secured with a tiny amount of ca.  If you mask the turnbuckles before painting, the clear fishing line will make the centre of the turnbuckle appear open, as it would be on a real car.  You can later touch-up the turnbuckle using a brush.

Wayne

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Posted by "JaBear" on Sunday, March 19, 2017 9:38 PM

doctorwayne
Bear, I think that you've misspelled "turnbuckle"

I’m tempted to stand my ground on this, Wayne, but because I’m on a railroad forum, I really should make sure that I use the correct nomenclature, “turnbuckle” instead of the aviation “turn barrel”. Actually, if truth be known, “turnbuckle” is also used in aviation, it just depends on what school, one attended!!   Smile, Wink & Grin

 

Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by maxman on Sunday, March 19, 2017 10:06 PM

OK so this is a flat car but...

Cheers, the Bear.Smile

 

It probably would be a good idea if someone explained to the OP what the purpose of the Turn Barrel Buckle was.

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Posted by "JaBear" on Sunday, March 19, 2017 10:22 PM

maxman
It probably would be a good idea if someone explained to the OP what the purpose of the Turn Barrel Buckle was.

While not an actual answer to maxmans comment regarding the purpose of the turn barrels buckles, (which were to adjust the truss rods to the required tension), here’s a link to a previous discussion on the purpose of truss rods….

Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by maxman on Sunday, March 19, 2017 10:45 PM

regarding the purpose of the turn barrels buckles, (which were to adjust the truss rods to the required tension)

Dang, it's late.  I should have said purpose of the truss rod, not turn thingy.

ACY
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Posted by ACY on Monday, March 20, 2017 8:39 AM

I definitely agree with Dr. Wayne about the use of monofilament fishing line. Most of my equipment represents the post truss rod era, so I've only done a few truss rod projects. On those I have done, I've found that wire is too unforgiving and easily bent or kinked to create an unprototypical look for truss rods, which should always be straight because they are in tension. 

Not only does monofilament provide a more predictably correct appearance, it's easier to work with. The Doctor's SR boxcar is all the evidence you need. 

Tom 

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, March 20, 2017 10:30 AM

Bear, I'd not heard the term "turn barrel" before and thought that perhaps it was simply a case of the "correct" word not coming to mind.  I did look it up in my dictionary, and while it wasn't there, I found that it's also known as a screw shackle.  So I've learned two new terms for those thingies under older freight cars, and I stand corrected on my correction. Oops - SignSmile, Wink & Grin

For anybody who has some time to kill and appreciates good modelling, there are a number of turnbuckles/turn barrels/screw shackles to be found HERE, along with scratchbuilt HO scale working nut/bolt/washer details.  

Wayne

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Posted by garya on Monday, March 20, 2017 11:06 PM
Purpose of the truss rods? Basically, they were a way to keep the frame and body from warping. Much like a bridge, a trussed body allowed for a stronger, lighter structure. The turnbuckles allow car mechanics to retension the truss rods.
Gary
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Posted by tomikawaTT on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 12:43 AM

Truss rods were used on cars with wood frames (and on some very early steel frame cars with shallow sills) to provide the necessary strength to resist vertical deflection.  The prototype truss rod ran from the end sill, over the truck bolster, under the queen or king posts (which were usually iron castings) and over the other truck bolster to the far end sill.  Queen post designs would have a single turnbuckle between the queen posts, while king post designs would have two turnbuckles per rod, one on each side of the king post.  King post cars were usually of short length and/or high capacity, like ore cars or four-truck flatcars.

In modeling a car with truss rods, there should be big nut/bolt/washer detail castings in each end sill, in line with the truss rods.

Chuck (Modeling Central Japan in September, 1964)

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Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 1:08 AM

doctorwayne
For anybody who has some time to kill and appreciates good modelling, there are a number of turnbuckles/turn barrels/screw shackles to be found HERE,

Wayne:

Bernhard's gondolas defy description! At first I couldn't believe they were HO scale. To tell the truth, they kind of took the wind out of my sails because my work is so crude by comparison. OH well, time to haul on the boot straps again!

Thanks for the link!

Dave

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Posted by "JaBear" on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 3:00 AM

doctorwayne
.....and thought that perhaps it was simply a case of the "correct" word not coming to mind

Off Topic

Unfortunately, Wayne, I find that happening from time to time,Sigh  and can brazen my brain fade out, by looking authoritative and pointing, which is impossible here.Embarrassed
 
Also, being a US based forum, I try to take care because of the differences in railway railroad terminology, switching = shunting, caboose= guards van etc.
 
Very early on, in my career, I was taught that the correct terminology was very important, the example being of an RAF station, early in WW 2, that requisitioned 10 airscrew and the ensuing confusion when 10 aircrew turned up!

Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by dknelson on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 9:59 AM

hon30critter

 

 
doctorwayne
For anybody who has some time to kill and appreciates good modelling, there are a number of turnbuckles/turn barrels/screw shackles to be found HERE,

 

Wayne:

Bernhard's gondolas defy description! At first I couldn't believe they were HO scale. To tell the truth, they kind of took the wind out of my sails because my work is so crude by comparison. OH well, time to haul on the boot straps again!

Thanks for the link!

Dave 

I second that motion.  This is craftsmanship of a sort more commonly associated with the builders of the most exquisite and delicate ship models - which of course aren't expected to actually sail anywhere or be handled on a regular basis!  

 

Dave Nelson

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Posted by doctorwayne on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 10:34 AM

Bernard's craftsmanship is, to me, both inspirational and awe-inspiring.  The search function in that forum works quite well, and he has several other threads there showcasing his considerable abilities.  I believe that there's also a link there to his website.

Wayne

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