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It's 'just' a boxcar...

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  • Member since
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  • From: MP 175.1 CN Neenah Sub
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It's 'just' a boxcar...
Posted by CNW 6000 on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 2:18 PM

I'm trying to determine which boxcars I can place where on my layout that I'm designing.  I have boxcars with several different kinds of doors.  Some (refrigerated) cars I can figure out would be used for certain goods/industries only.  The rest...I'm looking for a little guidance.

For example:
This car (https://flic.kr/p/5H7hxG ) has a sliding door and I don't think it would be insulated.  General goods in boxes/pallets?

This car (https://flic.kr/p/5H7hGW ) has double sliding doors, again not insulated.  Same as above, but simply with wider doors?

This car (https://flic.kr/p/7fs2x5 ) has a 'plug' door, but no active refrigeration.  Maybe for canned goods or something similar?

Is this also a 'plug' door car (https://flic.kr/p/7fs2wE )?  Canned good again?

Thanks in advance!

Dan

  • Member since
    October, 2001
  • From: OH
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Posted by BRAKIE on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 3:06 PM

Both the single and double door boxcar can be loaded with any type of lading from A to Z including some small auto parts and lumber.

The plug door is used for many things like beer,wine,fruits that doesn't require refrigeration,tobacco products and general freight.

Reference:

NS

http://www.nscorp.com/content/nscorp/en/shipping-tools/equipment-guide/merchandise-equipment.html

CSX

https://www.csx.com/index.cfm/customers/resources/equipment/railroad-equipment/

 

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

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Posted by dehusman on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 4:53 PM

CNW 6000
For example:This car (https://flic.kr/p/5H7hxG ) has a sliding door and I don't think it would be insulated. General goods in boxes/pallets?

Pretty much any commodity.

This car (https://flic.kr/p/5H7hGW ) has double sliding doors, again not insulated. Same as above, but simply with wider doors? 

Sorta.  The wider doors allow wider stuff to be loaded.  This car is good for lumber and large objects 16 or so feet long.  It can also handle smaller stuff.

This car (https://flic.kr/p/7fs2x5 ) has a 'plug' door, but no active refrigeration. Maybe for canned goods or something similar?

Check if the car has a car type "RBL".  That is an insulated boxcar without refrigeration.  They are used for food products from beer to canned goods.  If not, if it has a non-"R" car type then its just a double door and is good for paper products, food products that do not need refrigeration or can be exposed to freezing temperatures, and other high quality goods.

Is this also a 'plug' door car (https://flic.kr/p/7fs2wE )? Canned good again?

More like appliances or paper with the wider door.


 

Dave H. Painted side goes up.

ACY
  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • 2,745 posts
Posted by ACY on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 5:24 PM

Traditionally, double door cars were intended for large items such as lumber, appliances,  furniture, and large machinery. In the old days, they often had end doors for loading large items including highway vehicles, or small lumber doors in the ends. Auto parts were often loaded in them because of the ease of loading and unloading with a forklift. In many cases, cars were specially equipped with racks for handling designated lading, and were usually so identified in the ORER. 

Tom

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: California
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Posted by DSchmitt on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 7:46 PM

Most models like the prototype will have the AAR Class stenciled on the side.  This will tell you general way what types of cargo the car is ment to haul.

http://trn.trains.com/railroads/abcs-of-railroading/2006/05/freight-car-classifications

http://espee.railfan.net/aar_1989.html

http://www.nakina.net/other/aartype.html

 

 

 

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

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Posted by ericsp on Thursday, March 02, 2017 1:25 AM

The WSOR car is a RBL. The DRGW car is a XM, XL, or similar but the real car that carried that number was a RBL. The Athearn Genesis ribbed side, single door RBL is the correct model for the DRGW prototype. Canned goods would be good commodities for these.

The others could carry lumber, kraft paper, bulk tomato products, bricks, bins of rubber, paper to be recycled, or just about any other cargo that can stand some dust, does not need temperature control, and will fit. Yreka Western originated lumber products. If the car was an IPD car or carrying a backhaul, it could carry other things.

"No soup for you!" - Yev Kassem (from Seinfeld)

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Posted by wjstix on Thursday, March 02, 2017 9:33 AM

Many of the early 10'-6" high double-door 50' boxcars were "automobile" cars, used to transport newly built cars, and were often labelled as such on the sides of the car (and/or had a white stripe on one door on each side). They had a rack on one end of the car. A worker drove the car into the car and onto the rack, and the car was then elevated high enough that a second car could be driven in below it. Then a third car was driven into the other end of the car.

Although the need to carry autos in boxcars subsided after specially designed automobile cars came along in the 1950's, many of these 'automobile' boxcars lasted for years in regular freight service (with the rack removed).

Stix
  • Member since
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  • From: MP 175.1 CN Neenah Sub
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Posted by CNW 6000 on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 2:12 PM

Thanks for the replies. Gives me good places to start in looking at what industries to plan for.

Dan

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