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Prototype Trackage Maps

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Prototype Trackage Maps
Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 12:02 AM

 Hi I am looking for track alignment maps for the Tehachapi Loop, Horseshoe Curve, Spiral Tunnels, Keddie Wye, and Cascade Tunnel areas. Any ideas on where to find these?

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 3:28 AM

This one is fun...

http://www.openrailwaymap.org/?lang=en&lat=53.083301544189&lon=9.6000003814697&zoom=10&style=standard

This site has a bunch, too, but mostly eastern roads:

http://www.railsandtrails.com/diagrams.htm

This site you have to dig for it but the curve is in there somewhere. (I made a link that's easier to find)

http://sbiii.com/prrtrkch.html#hshucurv

 

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 9:53 AM

Thanks!

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Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 9:56 AM

What I meant though is actual paper maps like an atlas.

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Posted by up831 on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 10:35 AM

I'm not absolutely sure about Google maps, but I think they do have rail lines on the maps.  Find the place you want, zoom in (or out), then switch to satellite view, and it should give you a picture of the actual trackage as it exists today.  Then print it out.  For areas like Tehachapi or horseshoe curve, those are current and not much has changed in the basic layout.  Eg: horseshoe curve has three tracks now, but used to have four.  It's still within the same space.

But, if you want trackage plans from a specific time or are no longer there, then you have to dig for it.  Sometimes old city maps will show track layouts.  Some sources like USGS and universities will have archived photos.  Also, check the railroad's historical society for maps.

I hope this helps.

Less is more,...more or less!

Jim (with a nod to Mr. Van Der Rohe)

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Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 10:42 AM

Thank you!

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 10:46 AM

Yes, Google maps will show everything that is there, and you can zoom in enough to count the ties.  I use it a lot.

Mike.

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Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 11:19 AM

Wow! Thanks for the advice. Check out my other prototype info forum threads I have and my website: cascadenorthernrr.webs.com

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Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 9:38 PM

Just curious what would be a good railroad atlas?

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Posted by gmpullman on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 4:32 AM
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Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 10:16 AM

Thanks!

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Posted by BMMECNYC on Sunday, January 22, 2017 1:36 PM

Ive got a couple of railroad atlases (not sure where they are at the moment).  You can pick them up at large train shows (got mine at the national train shows).  Look for the tables with old railroad artifacts (timetables and the like).

You might also check USGS topographic maps, and sandborn fire insurance maps.

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
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Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Sunday, January 22, 2017 6:45 PM

By chance what would be the closest train show to the pelican state?

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Posted by BMMECNYC on Sunday, January 22, 2017 6:47 PM
Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
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Posted by SouthPenn on Sunday, January 22, 2017 8:54 PM

The US Geological service has maps that go back to the early 1900's. They usually show all the railroads that were operating when the map was made.

You can download them and print them out for free.

South Penn
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Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Sunday, January 22, 2017 9:32 PM

Thanks!

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Posted by olson185 on Thursday, March 09, 2017 9:51 PM

SouthPenn

The US Geological service has maps that go back to the early 1900's. They usually show all the railroads that were operating when the map was made.

You can download them and print them out for free.

Actually, they tend to show the railroad tracks; not the operating railroads or, necessarily, what railroad was using which tracks.  The earliest USGS maps are from the 1880's in some areas.

https://ngmdb.usgs.gov/maps/TopoView/viewer/#4/39.98/-100.06

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Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Friday, March 10, 2017 11:20 PM

Cool!

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Posted by BMMECNYC on Saturday, March 11, 2017 5:38 AM

You might also try the Library of Congress.  They most likely have a complete set of the circa 1918 railroad valuation maps.

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Posted by BMMECNYC on Saturday, March 11, 2017 5:42 AM

You might also check universities in state where your specific maps would be located, sometimes they have the valuation maps as well.   Google: New Haven Railroad Valuation Maps.   It will take you to the UCONN website, where you will find a map of new England with a bunch of little red squares on it.  Those are valuation maps.  They are surveys that show tracks and trackside structures.

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
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Posted by olson185 on Saturday, March 11, 2017 8:19 AM

Ed (gmpullman), thanks for the railsandtrails.com link.  While the track chart info. is written in a language I don't know ("rr engineeranese"), I think I can figure out much of what is relevant for modeling. 

Twenty yrs. ago rail-trail sites didn't have such nice RR info. so it didn't occur to me to check back with them.

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Posted by BMMECNYC on Saturday, March 11, 2017 8:26 AM

olson185

Ed (gmpullman), thanks for the railsandtrails.com link.  While the track chart info. is written in a language I don't know ("rr engineeranese"), I think I can figure out much of what is relevant for modeling. 

Twenty yrs. ago rail-trail sites didn't have such nice RR info. so it didn't occur to me to check back with them.

 

I knew that sounded familiar.  http://www.railsandtrails.com/NMRA/Research/index.html

I went to that clinic.

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
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Posted by DSchmitt on Saturday, March 11, 2017 9:11 AM

gmpullman

They are not very detailed. They show the lines, junctions and yard locations but not actual track arangements.   Also I have found some mistakes. 

For instance on the California map (just south of Marysville) they show a connection running east from the Western Pacific (an unnamed location) to Dantoni Junction on the Southern Pacific.  Dantoni Jct is south of the Yuba River which is not shown. This connection does not exist and never has.  A short branch (not shown) used to run from Dantoni Jct to Dantoni which is east of Dantoni Jct.  

On the north side of the river there was a spur running east from the WP to a sand plant (dredging the Yuba River). I believe they mistook this spur for a connection between the railroads. The east end of the spur was about 100ft short of the SP and at least 30 feet below the SP track.

 

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

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Posted by cascadenorthernrr on Monday, March 13, 2017 10:34 AM

Ok, cool!

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