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Tunnels going up??????

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Tunnels going up??????
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, February 18, 2005 7:48 PM
What is the best way to make an incline inside a mountain that will be about two feet in diameter???????


Can any one help me[%-)]
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  • From: City of Québec,Canada
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Posted by Jacktal on Friday, February 18, 2005 10:27 PM
If I understood you well,your mountain isn't built yet.If so,simply build your trackwork to the desired incline (2-3% at most recommended) on your benchwork then build your tunnel and mountain over it afterwards..Better still would be a removable mountain in case of derailments or track repairs.
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Posted by northeast_train_guy_1965 on Monday, February 12, 2018 10:48 AM

Just curious but I don’t want to start another thread under prototypical operations.

 

 Are inclines and declines  in tunnels prototypical in Railroad trackage? I know they are used in mining, but are they used on mainlines or  branch lines?

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Posted by cuyama on Monday, February 12, 2018 10:52 AM

northeast_train_guy_1965
Are inclinedps in tunnels prototypical in Railroad trackage?

Assuming that you mean "inclines" (or grades), yes, there are grades in tunnels in real life.

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  • From: Vancouver Island, BC
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Posted by selector on Monday, February 12, 2018 11:33 AM

Except possibly for yards, the heavy majority of trackage is not level.  It may be only at 0.15% grade, it might be many times that, but the rails always have to rise and to descend in order to get the cars riding on them to a market or destination, particularly in hilly terrain.  It's worse in mountainous terrain.

Accordingly, almost all bridges are on a grade, and so is the trackage inside of most tunnels across a continent.   Essentially, if the destination is on the other side of a range of hills or mountains, even if the tracks parallel an apparently level river, like the Hudson route in NY, the route necessarily is on a grade.  Railroads don't level the right of way simply because they need to cross a river with a bridge, and they don't necessarily want to level the tracks inside of a tunnel either...and for the same reason: they want their trains on a fairly steady climb to a pass of sorts and then to descend in the same steady/orderly fashion safely.

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Posted by NWP SWP on Monday, February 12, 2018 12:34 PM

Two of the most notable "tunnels on a grade" would be the Spiral Tunnels in Canada!

Steven

Crooner, Imagineer, High School Graduate, living with Aspergers, President of the Republica Pacifica micronation,  President of the NWP-SWP System.

Hook'em Longhorns! 

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Posted by Pruitt on Monday, February 12, 2018 2:37 PM

Tunnels are almost always on a grade, even when track alignment doesn't really require it. The reason is for water drainage.

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