Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Super gluing walkway sections

570 views
8 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    May 2017
  • 56 posts
Super gluing walkway sections
Posted by Capt.Brigg on Thursday, January 7, 2021 11:21 PM

I am using Super Glue to attach several length of plastic walkway on a bridge and want to be sure the sections line up flat between sections. Is there a material I can use to lay the walkway sections upon flat, while adding the Super glue, that will not stick to the bottom of the walkway sections? Something like wax paper over my workbench top, or something else?

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 11,237 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Thursday, January 7, 2021 11:54 PM

I'd question why you'd use a Super Glue (I assume that's some brand of ca) for cementing plastic to plastic.  You'll get a better (and neater) bond using a solvent-type cement, such as that from Testors.  I use MEK, buying it in gallon cans - works great, bonds quickly.

Wayne

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: west coast
  • 5,756 posts
Posted by rrebell on Thursday, January 7, 2021 11:57 PM

I had an issue with a build and regular tube gle was too stringy and bottle type did not stay wet long enough, found you could mix the two to get the exact formula you need.

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 10,941 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, January 8, 2021 12:23 AM

Capt.Brigg
Is there a material I can use to lay the walkway sections upon flat, while adding the Super glue, that will not stick to the bottom of the walkway sections?

I have a heavy plastic cutting board from Ikea that super-glue will not stick to.

Unfortunately, I have no idea how to tell you to find a similar item.

I have been back to Ikea several times since I bought it, and never found another one like it.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 20,323 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Friday, January 8, 2021 5:46 AM

Capt.Brigg

I am using Super Glue to attach several length of plastic walkway on a bridge and want to be sure the sections line up flat between sections. Is there a material I can use to lay the walkway sections upon flat, while adding the Super glue, that will not stick to the bottom of the walkway sections? Something like wax paper over my workbench top, or something else? 

Try parchment paper.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    May 2010
  • 7,430 posts
Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, January 8, 2021 9:07 AM

richhotrain
Try parchment paper.

That sounds like a good idea!  The wife won't bake anything without using it.

I was going to suggest a piece of glass, like a mirror.

As the good Dr. Wayne does, I also use MEK.  I do use ca when I'm working with etched metal walkways.

You'll have to show us some pics of your bridge!

Mike.

  • Member since
    June 2020
  • 1,261 posts
Posted by Lastspikemike on Friday, January 8, 2021 9:28 AM

Wax paper is ideal. Parchment paper is mainly for heat resistant applications. It is porous. 

Alyth Yard

Canada

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 14,761 posts
Posted by Overmod on Saturday, January 9, 2021 11:15 AM

mbinsewi
I was going to suggest a piece of glass, like a mirror.

Be careful.  Glass can be funny when glue dries on it.  Even some conventional glues happily spall out the surface of glass if they harden on it.

I don't think CA is in that category but experimentation to find out ought to be done first.  Some of the 'proposed' alternative glues are more likely to cause trouble...

I'd use either HDPE or HDPP cutting boards, which are cheaply available in reasonably large size.  Some of these have an artificially 'textured' surface ("to help food stay located while cutting" which may help mechanical bonding -- either find one with a 'smooth' back or front surface, or consider using an appropriate flat cutter (like a planer knife or round-corner utility blade) to scrape the surface lightly without gouging.  I suspect applying heat to a sheet of... well, parchment paper might work... something flat and smooth and thermally insensitive, say with a clothes iron set near high, would also get you the desired glass-smooth plastic surface.

I shy away from wax paper.  Sources indicate that cyanoacrylate sticks to wax.  His parts will come off the sheet, but they may have mingled blobs of CA and wax right in the fine detail of his walkways.  He'll have fun with new #1 tips and 4x visor getting that stuff out!

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 11,237 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, January 9, 2021 9:56 PM

My work surface for much of my model building is glass, and when using ca for small tasks, such as securing wire grabirons or sill steps, I apply a small puddle of ca to the glass, then use an X-Acto knife with an older blade, dipping the tip into the ca, then touching it (on the inside of the car) to the wire where it protrudes into the car.  This puts the ca where it's needed, with little waste or mess.  At some point, the diminishing puddle on the glass begins to set.  Once it's hardened, I use a chisel-type blade, bevelled-edge down, to scrape it from the glass.  It may have somewhat of spalling effect on the glass, as it's not as smooth and shiny as it was originally.  Of course, I also do a lot of cutting on the glass surface, too, along with sanding and filing.

A few minutes ago, I used a drop of ca to cement a small piece of styrene to waxed paper, and while it did stick, it took little effort to remove it, although it appears that some of the wax came off the paper, too.

Ca is not the best choice for use with plastic...I can't count the number of times that I've bought used DPM structures from various hobby shops, assembled with ca, and, when I got them home, took them apart easily, without need of tools of any kind.

Wayne

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!