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Rookie question: Are turnouts generally compatible?

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  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 9,618 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, October 10, 2020 11:36 AM

Overmod
 Foam is just ducky for noise abatement or building up scenery volume without mass or expense,

I need someone to explain this whole "noise abatement" thing to me. What noise?

When my trains run, at least 90% of the noise I hear is from the metal wheels on the metal rails. It is the same noise I hear if I just roll a freight car truck down the rails. No noise abatement will get rid of that.

Are you talking about locomotive noise? The only locomotive I have that makes any appreciable noise is my old Tenshodo 0-8-0, that thing is noisy, but the noise comes from the locomotive mechanism. Nothing in the bechwork will lower that noise level.

I like the noise of metal wheels gliding down metal rails.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Maryland
  • 9,638 posts
Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, October 10, 2020 1:10 PM

SeeYou190

 

 
Overmod
 Foam is just ducky for noise abatement or building up scenery volume without mass or expense,

 

I need someone to explain this whole "noise abatement" thing to me. What noise?

When my trains run, at least 90% odf the noise is the metal wheels on the metal rails. The noise you here is you just roll a freight car truck down rails. No noise abatement will get rid of that.

Are you talking about locomotive noise? The only locomotive I have that makes any appreciable noise is my old Tenshodo 0-8-0, that thing is noisy, but the noise comes from the locomotive mechanism. Nothing in the bechwork will lower that noise level.

I like the noise of metal wheels gliding down metal rails.

-Kevin

 

Agreed, I think you build firm benchwork like me from what I have seen, even if you do use some foam in the process.

Sheldon

    

  • Member since
    February 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 28,926 posts
Posted by rrinker on Saturday, October 10, 2020 1:18 PM

 The real answer is, it all works. I have not had noise problems with plywood on grid, or foam on grid. I have not had stability problems with either method. The closest to a stability issue was a short section on my last layout what was rather narrow. I couldn;t attach tot he walls, it was a rental, and the room was carpeted, so a long narrow table standing on 4 legs is naturally going to be somewhat wobbly. I did end up using a single 90 degree bracket in the middle into a stud, one little hole in the wall, like hanging a picture, only lower,. Easily patched. The other sections, that were 2' wide - they didn't wobble, despite the light weight. 

                           --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    June 2020
  • 801 posts
Posted by Lastspikemike on Saturday, October 10, 2020 2:19 PM

Homasote is designed and manufactured as a sound absorption material. That's its primary function. It's also  cheap, eco friendly and treated to prevent mould.  We used the sheet material for underflooring our Pergo engineered wood flooring (laminate coated MDF), laid on below grade concrete subfloor, and it absorbs sound exceptionally well. The underflooring stuff is made with a square grid of cuts you put face down to provide moisture migration channels. It's pretty much permanent under your flooring.

Different foams will have different sound absorbing or amplifying characteristics. Solid insulating foam absorbs sound very well only if encapsulated inside a wall for example.  As an open surface it will have some amplification characteristics as for most large flat surfaces. It is quite reflective of sound waves actually hitting it directly.  Cover it with wood or plaster cloth and the dissimilar mass joined faces will dampen sound quite well.

I'm thinking of gluing 1/8 plywood or perhaps 1/4 MDF to the underside of the 1/2" foam base to give some durability to the edges and bottom face of my foam layout sections. 

Alyth Yard

Canada

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 9,618 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, October 10, 2020 8:45 PM

SeeYou190
When my trains run, at least 90% of the noise I hear is from the metal wheels on the metal rails. It is the same noise I hear if I just roll a freight car truck down the rails. No noise abatement will get rid of that.

I re-wrote this part of my earlier post. I don't know what I was thinking when I typed it earier. This paragraph made no sense.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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