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Building a layout on a rotisserie

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Posted by richhotrain on Monday, March 23, 2020 2:06 PM

Too bad that this once interesting layout building thread has turned into a thread about beer.   Sad

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by rrinker on Monday, March 23, 2020 4:36 PM

 Don't be such a sourpuss Stick out tongue , I hate tightly regulated forums, it's much more fun when it's more like a bunch of people sitting around talking. Bull sessions are a long time tradition in model railroading, among other things. Besides, there's no rule G in model railroading - it may in fact make the layout turn out better. Just stay away from the power tools.

 I'm sure after the next bit of progress, Dave will have an update and it will swing right back on topic. Until the next side track. There's already been a whole bunch of talk about things other than the actual construction in my thread too, I don't care. Especially right now when it's not a good idea to have any friends actually come over and help me work on it.

                     --Randy

 

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by richhotrain on Monday, March 23, 2020 4:44 PM

rrinker

 Don't be such a sourpuss

Crying Crying Crying Crying Crying

Alton Junction

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, March 23, 2020 4:50 PM

richhotrain
Too bad that this once interesting layout building thread has turned into a thread about beer.

It would be disappointing, but it was the OP (Thread Owner) that started the beer discussion with this posting:

hon30critter
I'm in Canada so I don't have the opportunity to sample most American beers. However, I can honestly state that those beers that I have tried that hail from south of the border have disappointed me greatly! I'm sure that Ulrich will agree that a good beer should have some body and distinctive flavour, and leave more in your gut than great big farts! There!!! That ought to get the debate roiling!!! Please be polite in your responses!

I am sure Dave will get the thread back on track and it will be interesting again.

Meanwhile... nothing wrong with spending a little time in a siding.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by richhotrain on Monday, March 23, 2020 4:59 PM

SeeYou190
 
richhotrain
Too bad that this once interesting layout building thread has turned into a thread about beer. 

 

 

I am sure Dave will get the thread back on track and it will be interesting again.

Meanwhile... nothing wrong with spending a little time in a siding.

OK, I have been chastised twice, so I am now adopting the proverb, if you can't beat them, join them.

The only beer worth drinking is Becks.   BeerBeerBeer

OK, and Sam Adams Boston Lager.   Beer

The rest of the stuff is pure crap.  Stick out tongue

Richard Beck

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, March 23, 2020 5:16 PM

richhotrain
if you can't beat them, join them.

Yep!  Talked me into it!  I'm about to sit down to a Drinks, only mine is the amber liquid over the rocks,  before diner.

Speaking of diner, wasn't this thread about something on a rotisserie? 

Dinner

Mike.

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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, March 23, 2020 9:09 PM

Okay, I'm sorry for going off topic but since Covid-19 has brought construction to a halt, I'll have to talk about something.

I did make a small addition to the end support design. I'm going to put 9" x 48" shelves with a small lip on them on top of both end supports. They will be handy for all sorts of things like setting tools down, or opening rolling stock boxes once the scenery is done or setting down my beer!!

The reason for using a 9" width is that there will be exactly 18" left on the end of the 4x8 sheet of 3/4" plywood once all the other bits are cut from it. I checked the reach in distances and the shelves will not interfere with my ability to do the track installation on the ends of the benchwork. If they do become a problem they can easily be removed.

I should clarify my comment about not having access to most American beers. We do have the major brands but that's about it.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, March 23, 2020 9:39 PM

hon30critter
Okay, I'm sorry for going off topic but since Covid-19 has brought construction to a halt, I'll have to talk about something.

 Dave, no problem, Yes  we're all just having fun here!

Our local Menards started their 11% sale this week.  I didn't think they would do this until all of this crap is over with, drawing a large crowd, and such. BUT, it's on!  And I DO need to get some stuff.

Waiting to see your final design, and construction, at your pace.

Mike.

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Posted by rrinker on Monday, March 23, 2020 10:19 PM

 I was at the local Lowes this weekend to get more supplies - I was expecting it to be kind of empty, nope, parking lot packed. Not a ton of people in the store based on the number of cars - but I think most were over in the garden section buying plants. Of course I used most of that all up already and now I have to go get more. Then I'm sort of stuck - the next part is some floor standing benchwork and I have all the old legs off my previous layout I want to reuse, but they are totally buried behind all the stuff stored in the garage..doh! The other option is to continue the way I've been going, finish the long wall where the yard will go and then build the moveable part in front of the furnace. Another load of 2x4s will get me to the point of where the moveable part will start, I'm not sure I have enough plywood to make all the horizontal pieces for all 3 levels to that point. I can get the plywood delivered though - if they are still open. I have to have it delivered anyway, it doesn't fit in my truck.

                             --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by FlattenedQuarter on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 12:43 PM

Any self respecting lumber yard( not big box) will have 1*6 and 1*4 in pine and in 2foot increments starting @ 4'. Poplar is a harder, shorter grain wood and more apt to split.

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Posted by carl425 on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 2:51 PM

FlattenedQuarter
Poplar is a harder

Several species of pine are harder than poplar - including the Southern Yellow Pine I use for my benchwork.

I have the right to remain silent.  By posting here I have given up that right and accept that anything I say can and will be used as evidence to critique me.

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 2:55 PM

richhotrain
OK, I have been chastised twice

Rich, I did not mean for that to seem like I was chastising you. I know I sometimes have a difficult time writing in the tone I intend.

My appologies.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 3:13 PM

SeeYou190
 
richhotrain
OK, I have been chastised twice 

Rich, I did not mean for that to seem like I was chastising you. I know I sometimes have a difficult time writing in the tone I intend.

My appologies.

-Kevin 

Kevin, no need for apologies, but that was kind of you to extend them.

I grew tired of the extended beer discussion and then my friend Randy jumped on me. So, when I also heard from you, I figured that I should lighten up. I think that I must be suffering from cabin fever. Dead

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 4:49 PM

 I wasn't jumping on anyone, did you miss the Stick out tongue ?

It's all in fun.

                        --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by snjroy on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 10:14 PM

In Eastern Canada, it would be White Pine, which is definitely a softwood. Poplar, at least what I have seen around here, is harder. 

Simon

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Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 10:16 PM

richhotrain
I grew tired of the extended beer discussion

Rich,

I'm sorry that the thread disappointed you with the extended references to beer. I can appreciate your feelings. I am getting really frustrated with the delays that Covid-19 is imposing on my project. I have to clear space in the garage before I can order the wood but I can't do that until I have a yard sale.Crying I have ordered some structure kits to fill the time but they won't likely be here for at least three weeks.Grumpy I have tweaked the benchwork plan to the point where it is almost starting to bore me!

Bang HeadBang HeadBang HeadBang HeadBang Head

Oh well, chin up and carry on regardless! This nightmare will end eventually and we will get back to normal!

Cheers!!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 3:59 AM

Not to worry, Dave. I continue to follow your thread. Beer

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 6:02 PM

I just scored 850 #8 x 2 1/2" Robertson screws for free! Here's how:

I figure that I will need between 200 and 300 screws to assemble the benchwork. Home Depot Canada sells a package of 350 screws for $32.00. Getting them delivered would have cost an additional $21.00 or so. They also sell a package of 1200 screws for $49.00, and if you order more than $49.00 online then delivery is free! So let's see the math:

350 screws for a total of $53.00 or 1200 screws for $49.00. Gee, I wonder what I should do?

I also needed a couple of other items, specifically #2 Robertson driver bits. HD sells a set of five Milwaukee bits for $13.00, and they also sell a kit with a variety of 20 different Milwaukee bits for $24.00 which includes five of the #2 Robertson bits. I needed some bits besides the #2 Robertsons and I almost bought them all separately until I noticed the kit. Buying them all separately would have cost me about $35.00.

If I keep saving money like this eventually the layout should be free, right?Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaugh

Seriously, I don't have a clue what I will do with 850 extra screws but it just didn't make sense to turn them down. Maybe I can sell half of them in the yard sale, whenever that happens.

I also broke down and ordered a small Bosch impact screw driver. I have built tons of stuff using my regular drill to drive screws but I hate the way that the bit often wants to jump out of the screw head. I watched our kitchen contractor use his impact driver and it worked extremely well so I decided to treat myself. My birthday is in May so Dianne can give it to me as a birthday present!

I also bought a set of cheap folding saw horses from Canadian Tire. I love their promotions!Smile, Wink & Grin They were on sale for $14.99 ea. with a claimed regular price of $64.99!!! Ya, right! I wonder how many they have sold at full price?!? By the way, I'm not expecting much out of them. I definitely won't be standing on them!

Cheers!!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 6:11 PM

hon30critter

I figure that I will need between 200 and 300 screws to assemble the benchwork. Home Depot Canada sells a package of 350 screws for $32.00. Getting them delivered would have cost an additional $21.00 or so. They also sell a package of 1200 screws for $49.00, and if you order more than $49.00 online then delivery is free! So let's see the math:

350 screws for a total of $53.00 or 1200 screws for $49.00. Gee, I wonder what I should do?

Seriously, I don't have a clue what I will do with 850 extra screws but it just didn't make sense to turn them down. 

LOL

Dave, I went through the same thing when I installed recessed LED lighting cans in my basement. In our area, we are required to use conduit for the wiring. I went to Home Depot to buy a bag of 50 conduit connectors to the junction boxes and ceiling boxes only to find out that a jar of 250 conduit connectors was cheaper. 

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by rrinker on Thursday, March 26, 2020 7:40 AM

 The screws I got for my benchwork are a Torx variation - but I didn't need any bits. I got small packs to try them, which come with a bit in each pack, and I have since bought the big pack - which also comes with a bit in each pack. With 3 different size screws needed, I now have 6 bits - 5 still in the package since the first one hasn;t worn out yet. Which is surprising - I was expecting the bit quality to be such as to just barely make it through the pack of screws it came with before being so rounded off as to be unusable. 

 Maybe that's what I need, an impact driver - it's a little easier with my old heavier 18V driver (with an adapter to use the 20V Li-ion packs - one caution, do not leave the battery pack attached when not using the tool, the adapter draws power constantly) as the new 20V drill/driver is more lightweight even ignoring the weight of battery packs, but still it's very obvious I have the screws in the right place as it constantly wants to jump out. The lower ones are not a problem, I cna really lean into them, but the upper ones are hard to put my weight against, they are over my head.

 I may have to run out today and get my supplies, in several surrounding counties they issued shelter in place orders with zero warning. I calculated what I need to finish the yard/town room up to the point of havin the backdrop primed and the horizontals all attached, I don't need much to get there, but I do need some more lumber, sandpaper,  and the paint supplies. Guess I could get a nice sky blue paint and completely finish the backdrops while I'm at it.

                               --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by richhotrain on Thursday, March 26, 2020 8:04 AM

rrinker

Maybe that's what I need, an impact driver 

I always used an electric drill and a cordless drill for my household tasks and layout building projects. But, when I started my new layout, I decided to try an impact drill. Now, I cannot live without it. Best tool I have ever owned.

As you say, Randy, always remove the battery when not in use. I alternate my two batteries, charging them in between uses.

Here is my impact drill, complete with two power packs.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Makita-1-5-Ah-18-Volt-LXT-Lithium-Ion-Compact-Cordless-1-4-in-Impact-Driver-Kit-XDT11SY/310782938

If you buy an impact drill, spend another five bucks and also buy a magnetic bit holder. An impact drill will dull the bit in no time. After going through nearly a dozen bits in short order, I bought this little sucker and now I almost never need to replace impact drill bits.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Makita-IMPACT-XPS-3-in-Magnetic-Insert-Bit-Holder-E-01367/311427420

Drill, baby, drill!

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by Water Level Route on Thursday, March 26, 2020 8:21 AM

hon30critter
If I keep saving money like this eventually the layout should be free, right?

Hey, that sounds like the logic my wife would use!  Took me years to get her to understand that just because something is on sale doesn't mean that it doesn't cost money! Laugh

Mike

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Posted by rrinker on Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:01 AM

 I have plenty of bits, and at least 2 magnetic bit holders. It's also not much of an issue now that I have 2 tools, so I can keep a drill bit on one and the screwdriver bit in the other. That's the main reason I gae the 20V to 18V adapter a try, because the old nicads for the 18V drill were toast, and new ones cost way too much.

 It's only the adapter that drains the batteries - I can leave a pack attached to the actual 20V tool and it only runs down at the self discharge rate - ie, weeks later there is still plenty of charge left in it. Between the 20V tool and buying the adpater set, I have 4 batteries and 2 chargers, so I haven't even been slowed down by battery issues. I've considered buying some of the aftermarket battery packs - but every single one of them is NOT the stated capacity. However, they ARE higher capacity than the smaller genuine ones, at less cost. Just not as great a bargain as they would be if they actually were the stated capacity. It's almost as bad as inkjet printer ink, the li-ion battery packs are simple as - just some li-ion cells spot welded together. The same cells are cheap to buy, even getting name brand ones. And of course the tool packs are all proprietary

                                  --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by York1 on Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:20 AM

Water Level Route

 

 
hon30critter
If I keep saving money like this eventually the layout should be free, right?

 

Hey, that sounds like the logic my wife would use!  Took me years to get her to understand that just because something is on sale doesn't mean that it doesn't cost money! Laugh

 

 

 

My wife makes money like this:

1.  Buy an item using a credit card.

2.  Take the item back to get a different, cheaper item.

3.  Get the refund difference in cash.

 

She now has cash in her hand that she didn't have before.  She can now spend that money, and she has two items that are basically free.

York1 John       

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:36 AM

York1
My wife makes money like this: 1.  Buy an item using a credit card. 2.  Take the item back to get a different, cheaper item. 3.  Get the refund difference in cash.

Good one John, I almost beleived it.  Laugh

I have the Makita that Rich has, only I bought the set, with the drill.  I "retired" all my old 18v and 14.5v tools, too expensive to get battery replacements.

Mike.

 

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Posted by rrebell on Thursday, March 26, 2020 11:07 AM

Ah, the talk of tools. I started buying Ryobi over 15 years ago, why, because the 18 volt stuff is backward compatable. I have a number of tools from back then and they all use the new batteries. Also never accually killed one of their tools though some look like they should be shot. Last they are dirt cheap, esspecially during their sales.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, March 26, 2020 11:58 AM

rrebell
Ah, the talk of tools.

Of course!  If the thread can drift to the subject of beer, talking about the tools that Dave will absolutely possitively need to build this rotissery structure is perfectly acceptable.  Smile, Wink & Grin

Mike.

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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, March 26, 2020 11:25 PM

This is the driver that I bought. It is very small and only 12 volts.

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B003BEE12U/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Our contractor used a similar sized Milwaukee unit when he was replacing the deck stairs and it drove the long screws quite easily even without pre-drilling.

I'm only going to use 2 1/2" screws and I will pre-drill the holes so the 12 volt unit should be fine. When I get it I will test it to see if it is up to snuff. If not, I can return it.

I like the idea of the magnetic bit holder. Thanks Rich.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
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  • From: Dearborn Station
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Posted by richhotrain on Friday, March 27, 2020 4:16 AM

hon30critter

I like the idea of the magnetic bit holder. Thanks Rich.

Dave 

When I bought the impact drill, I also bought a pack of six impact drill bits. I immediately loved the performance of the impact drill, but I quickly noticed drill bit degradation. I had to repeatedly replace the drill bits. So, I went back out and bought a magnetic drill bit holder.

What a magnetic drill bit holder does is to distribute the force of the repeated impact, significantly increasing the interval between replacement of drill bits.

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by hon30critter on Friday, March 27, 2020 4:23 AM

richhotrain
What a magnetic drill bit holder does is to distribute the force of the repeated impact, significantly increasing the interval between replacement of drill bits.

Hi Rich,

I just ordered one. Unfortunately I couldn't find the exact one that you listed on Amazon or at Home Depot Canada so I chose a different Makita bit holder. It claims to have the same charactaristics for extending bit life.

This is what I ordered:

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00ECMC1F4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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