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Version 5 of The CB&Q in Wyoming

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  • Member since
    August 2011
  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
  • 4,042 posts
Posted by "JaBear" on Thursday, March 26, 2020 1:22 AM
Gidday, Mark, having had a closer look at your current “ceiling”, and being of a lazy disposition, I would do nothing.
 
My reasoning being that if I were ever to be able to visit your “completed layout”, my focus should be on the layout and not aimlessly gawking at your ceiling, exclaiming “Oooh, look at that shiny ducting!!" And if I were silly enough to so, then I would expect you to politely, yet expeditiously, show me out the front door!!
 
That said, now that I have the time, and to her-in-doors delight, I am installing white rigid polystyrene insulation, in my basement, which fits between the “floor” beams. I do not wish to cover the plumbing, so as to keep easy access if any repairs, hopefully not, ever need to be made.
 
However, if you were to clad your ceiling, then I would keep the steel I beams exposed, I’m not claustrophobic, as such, but then I could never be a submariner, either!
 
My 2 Cents Cheers, the Bear.

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 10,906 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, March 26, 2020 2:22 AM

Pruitt
I'm looking for some different viewpoints on types of ceilings, heights, etc., so don't be shy! Please share your thoughts.

Hi Mark,

I definitely agree that you don't want a ceiling that is only 3" above your head. Claustrophobia immediately comes to mind. I can't tolerate being in places where I am squeezed in, either vertically or horizontally. You want to enjoy the space, not regret it.

I think your suggestion of boxing in the beams with drywall is the best way to go, but I'm not sure that you need to use 2x4s. Decent quality 2x2s will be plenty solid enough once the drywall is screwed into place. I say that despite the fact that I am going to build my layout strong enough to hold a Sherman tank. If you want to use 2x4s then go for it! I'd probably do the same.Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaughLaugh

Cheers!!

Dave

  • Member since
    December 2008
  • From: In the heart of Georgia
  • 3,517 posts
Posted by Doughless on Thursday, March 26, 2020 7:13 PM

Pruitt

AND...

Even though it will be a couple months (at least) before I start the ceilings, I've started thinking about what to DO for a ceiling?

I was planning on installing a nice flat drop ceiling throughout the basement, but in clearing the steel beams will leave the ceiling about 3" over my head. That will feel a bit closed-in, I'm thinking.

I don't like the idea of a variable-height ceiling, but the best approach may be to box out around those beams and make the rest of the ceiling several inches higher (but low enough to clear the heating ducts and such) to provide decent head height throughout the rest of the basement. I can box the beams out easily enough with 2X4's and drywall, then maybe the drop ceilings everywhere else.

I'm looking for some different viewpoints on types of ceilings, heights, etc., so don't be shy! Please share your thoughts.

 

New construction means the ceiling will be relatively clean with no years of dust accumulation falling on to the layout.  Not that I ever experienced much of that.  All of my layouts have been built in rooms with unfinished ceilings.

 I would do nothing.

Except possibly painting it all black as to make any cluttered look disappear (an artist's trick).  Never used it, but there is a product called dryfall.  Its a sprayed paint that dries on the way down so the excess can be swept up from the floor.

- Douglas

  • Member since
    May 2010
  • 6,765 posts
Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, March 26, 2020 9:57 PM

Pruitt
I'm looking for some different viewpoints on types of ceilings, heights, etc., so don't be shy! Please share your thoughts.

I think I'd box out the beam with framing and drywall, and do the ceiling as close to the joist as you can, giving you all the head room you can get.

Are you still going to use the LED ceiling lights you had for the last version?  

Mike.

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: New Jersey, a founding member of the USSA
  • 2,347 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:11 PM

Thanks for all the input, guys!

I especially like the recommendations to not do anything with it! Fits right in with my basic philosophy - when possible, do as little as you can. Big Smile

Mike - Yes, I'm going to use the same lights. And I mean the same lights. I took them down at the old house and brought them with me.

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: New Jersey, a founding member of the USSA
  • 2,347 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Monday, March 30, 2020 10:39 AM

30 March 2020

Work continues. The last several days I spent laying additional OSB in several locations, and adding another studwall:

At this point I'm about 40% done with the walls, and 80% with the subfloor. By late April, at this rate, I should be able to start the electrical work.

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