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Version 5 of The CB&Q in Wyoming

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  • Member since
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Posted by Pruitt on Friday, January 24, 2020 12:44 PM

24 January 2020

Well, I think I'm finally on track (ahem) with the track plan. I've spent some time on Option 5, and here's where it's at now:

The Wind River Canyon peninsula looks pretty complicated, but I've checked all elevations and they work out. The hidden Frannie Staging is on the lowest level of the layout. Cody is about 4 inches above that, then Thermopolis, on the main deck, is about 15" above Cody. Ten inches higher, and hidden in the peninsula, is the Lander branch, climbing towards Lander on the opposite side of the room.

It looks complicated, but it isn't that bad. The hard part was working out the elevations.

I'll be adding some elevation markers as I further refine the plan, and maybe posting some cross-section views to clarify track clearances, etc.

I think I'm going with this option. I'm a bit disappointed that I won't have Laurel yard on the NP, but I'll certainly be able to live with that.

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Posted by Doughless on Friday, January 24, 2020 1:41 PM

Make it so!

- Douglas

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Posted by Colorado Ray on Friday, January 24, 2020 10:51 PM

The only issue I see with Option 5 is that you have the narrow aisle right where the Casper yard crew will be working.  I'd suggest sliding Casper to the right and shortening Powder River.

Ray

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Posted by Doughless on Saturday, January 25, 2020 10:12 AM

Colorado Ray

The only issue I see with Option 5 is that you have the narrow aisle right where the Casper yard crew will be working.  I'd suggest sliding Casper to the right and shortening Powder River.

Ray

 

Actually, sliding Casper all the way to the sump pump would be the best way to fit the blobs together, but that would introduce some other problems.

- Douglas

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Posted by Pruitt on Saturday, January 25, 2020 10:17 AM

I had a version of the plan with Casper all the way to the right, but it made fitting other elements rather problematic.

I'm into the "tweaking" (not twerking!) phase of plan development, and I'll be adjusting the position of the blob end of the Wind River Canyon and Worland peninsulas to provide more aisle space by Casper by reducing the space at Lander a little bit (pulling the blobs slightly towards the bottom of the diagram).

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Posted by selector on Saturday, January 25, 2020 6:47 PM

Nnoo....NO TWERKING!!  PUHLEESE!! Ick!

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Posted by Pruitt on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 11:47 AM

28 January 2020

I've added elevation callouts for all the station locations. That should make it a bit easier to "see" the plan in 3-D.

I've also adjusted the bolb ends of the peninsulas to provide a bit more room (8 inches or so) in the aisle so the Casper operator(s) won't feel quite so squeezed.

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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 2:23 AM

Pruitt
I've also adjusted the bolb ends of the peninsulas to provide a bit more room (8 inches or so) in the aisle so the Casper operator(s) won't feel quite so squeezed.

Hi Mark,

I'm a big guy so I am all in favour of wider aisles. When I designed my old club's layout I made the huge mistake of having the narrowest point in the aisles right where the Yard Master would be standing. If I was doing it again I would have made that part of the aisle at least two feet wider so that people could pass by the yard master without feeling squeezed. Hopefully your aisle adjustment will be sufficient to prevent operators from getting too intimate with the Yard Master as they pass by.Smile, Wink & GrinLaugh

Dave

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Posted by Pruitt on Monday, February 3, 2020 10:39 AM

3 February 2020

I just posted my latest video update:

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Posted by Pruitt on Monday, February 10, 2020 6:49 PM

10 February 2020

I've begun adding rigid foam insulation to the walls in areas where the subfloor is done. In the next week or so I'm going to try to start on the studwalls as well. Unfortunately I'm going to have to move that big pile of heavy boxes again.

Maybe by summer I'll have some actual layout updates to post (but don't hold your breath)!

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, February 27, 2020 9:49 PM

27 February 2020

I've had a nasty cold for several weeks, and early in the month I fell while cleaning snow off the driveway, so work on the basement has been even slower than normal (snails have been outrunning me lately!).

But the last few days I've been felling a bit better, so work has resumed.

Additional insulation has gone up (that's ridiculously easy to do), and today, with my wife's help, we got the first stud wall built and installed in the train room. She's pretty good at pounding in those 3 1/2" 16 penny nails!

Not nearly as fast as Randy's basement work, huh? 

But every bit of work is being done by my wife and I. Contractors just cost too much. Maybe by late summer or early autumn I'll be able to report on some model railroading again (don't hold your breath).

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, February 27, 2020 10:37 PM

You are lucky to have a wife that is willing and able to help.

It is looking good.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, February 27, 2020 11:13 PM

Hi Mark,

Sorry to hear about you being both under the weather and bruised. You are making great progress! This is not a race!

One small suggestion if I may: Buy your wife some safety boots. She is swinging pretty hard to drive 3 1/2" nails. One miss and she will be suffering too! Not worth the risk. Lecture over.

Dave

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Posted by selector on Friday, February 28, 2020 1:04 AM

...and that expensive-looking mirror ain't where it should be. Laugh

I say you should push.  You'll repair yourself more quickly if you keep a gentle, but irresistable, pressure to claim back some time.  Gardening is just around the corner, and the yard will beckon before long.  Or gutters.  Or repairing some trim or concrete.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, February 28, 2020 8:12 AM

Looking good Mark!  I like the way you insulated, then the stud walls. Yes  Progress is porgress, your not stepping backwards, even though I know it seems like it sometimes!

Yes  Moving on!

Mike.

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Posted by Pruitt on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 5:39 AM

3 March 2020

Thanks for the comments, everyone!

Here's the latest construction update video:

Short this month because I was under the weather for most of February.

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 7:20 AM

Pruitt

27 February 2020

I've had a nasty cold for several weeks, and early in the month I fell while cleaning snow off the driveway, so work on the basement has been even slower than normal (snails have been outrunning me lately!).

But the last few days I've been felling a bit better, so work has resumed.

Additional insulation has gone up (that's ridiculously easy to do), and today, with my wife's help, we got the first stud wall built and installed in the train room. She's pretty good at pounding in those 3 1/2" 16 penny nails!

Not nearly as fast as Randy's basement work, huh?

Major kudo's!

As far as fast vs. not, it depends on how much money you have to throw at it.  My wife and I aren't quite that well-to-do.  We could have afforded it but I didn't want to dip into savings and retirement isn't terribly far off.

But every bit of work is being done by my wife and I. Contractors just cost too much. Maybe by late summer or early autumn I'll be able to report on some model railroading again (don't hold your breath). 

It helps a lot to have a "handy" wife.  When I met my wife, who is born and raised in northern England, she told me she laid a brick fire place.  I was like, you'll do!

I can relate on the contractor cost thing.  A contractor quoted us $3k to install all the drywall.  We said thanks and did it all ourselves, walls ceiling, floor.  We only paid to have the wiring/outlets and plumbing done (full basement bathroom).  Sure is nice to have that bathroom when working on the layout for hours!

My wife and I are managing but with her kid still not working and having to buy him a car and do other project on the house, we wanted to minimize costs.  We spent as we went, used coupons and in the end figure we finished the basement and a full bathroom for under $5k.  It took about 11 months from pulling the permit to inspeced/passed, but we are probably about 15 grand richer for it.  DIY, if you can, can save you major money.

My wife and I probably split the work in half.  The studs were already in, but we both hung all the drywall.  I did most of the taping and mudding and installed the suspended ceiling grid.  I got a diamond grinder to level the concrete floor along the expansion cracks.  My wife washed the floor, sealed it and applied the adhesive before installing the vinyl floor faux wood planks.

Now that's looking more like it!  The layout will look so much better in a finished space.  And, a drop ceiling is surprisingly easy to install I discovered.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, March 5, 2020 1:45 PM

Progress is continuing. I just put down another sheet of OSB.

I'm going to bed now. Maybe I'll get up next week.

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Posted by selector on Thursday, March 5, 2020 5:34 PM

Nothing like some progress to get the heartbeat quickening, Mark.  And it's very precious that your squeeze came down to help you out.  Time like that will be beyond price in later years.  That image should be in a scrapbook somewhere, never to be forgotten.  Please pass on my compliments.

If you can believe it, I have video of my own wife pushing a wheelbarrow full of cordwood three summers ago, but the kicker was that she had a rope around her waist and was hauling a garden wagon also laden with about 70 pounds of wood.  I suddenly felt rather small when I saw that Herculean effort.  And it wasnt just one trip to the pile, either.  I think she managed three of four of those.  Across 70 feet of lawn.

Back to your prep, I'm really happy to see that you are persevering.  I know it sometimes seem a bit overwhelming, but keep plodding...it's good for weight control if nothing else. Laugh

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Friday, March 6, 2020 6:44 AM

It is a happy and good thing to have a wife who isn't afraid of doing some work like that.  I really appreciate it that my wife works so hard and did alot of major work when we were finishing the basement, especially the bathroom tile and basement floor work.  And the best thing is, I don't have to take a picture because it's not a rare thing, it's her MO.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, March 12, 2020 5:20 PM

I know refinishing the basement isn't the most scintillating of topics of a model railroading forum, but progress is continuing.

I've added several more sheets of OSB to the floor, and am now at the point where I only have room for one or two more full sheets before I have to start cutting them down for the final edges:

I've also, just today, added more rigid foam insulation in preparation for adding ahother ten feet to the long stud wall:

Part of that preparation including moving the pile of boxes again. Most of thet stuff I put on the other side of the stairs, out of the train room. Most of what you see in the pile in the picture above will ultimately find a place under the layout (except the shelves).

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Posted by hon30critter on Friday, March 13, 2020 12:31 PM

Pruitt
I've added several more sheets of OSB to the floor, and am now at the point where I only have room for one or two more full sheets before I have to start cutting them down for the final edges:

If it was me doing the fitted pieces it would probably take longer than the rest of the floor, and more material than the main area used as well! Stick lumber I can deal with. Sheets not as well. My brother and I once used three full sheets of drywall to fit the last piece into a ceiling. It should have taken less than a half sheet!Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaughDunce

Great to see your progress!

Dave

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, March 15, 2020 8:26 AM

Looking good Mark!  It looks like the structual parts of your bench work are doing a good job of holding up the insulation. Yes

Mike.

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, March 19, 2020 9:44 AM

Other than a lingering cough (gets me looks from folks right now!), I've recovered completely from my winter cold, so work has accelerated some on the basement.

Two more sections of studwall have been installed. Here my wife is helping install one wall section:

And yet more insulation braced against the wall while the adhesive cures:

And the second new section installed - one to go:

The windows will be framed out once the studwall is complete, which hopefully will be in the next few days.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, March 19, 2020 10:02 AM

Looking good Mark!  Are you putting more insulation between the studs? Just curious.

I may have missd this, but are you going to use drywall for the finish?

Mike.

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, March 19, 2020 12:08 PM

No more insulation. Just the rigid foam behind the studs.

I was thinking about doing a board-and-batten finish on the walls, to make it look like the outside of a train station, but wifey vetoed that. Sad It will be drywall. 

But I may paint the walls in Burlington station colors... Geeked

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, March 19, 2020 1:31 PM

Pruitt
But I may paint the walls in Burlington station colors... 

Laugh  There ya go!  If you don't have a back drop figured out, good ole' sky blue also works.

Mike.

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Posted by Pruitt on Sunday, March 22, 2020 5:23 PM

22 March 2020

Work continues on the basement.

The last section of the 40' long stud wall went up yesterday:

And today my wife and I framed out one of the windows:

Sorry for the dark image, but the daylight in the window really overpowered the light in the basement.

I would have framed the second window, but I ran out of 2X4's. I'll do it as I proceed with other walls in the room. First though, I have get back to laying subfloor (oh joy!).

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Posted by hon30critter on Sunday, March 22, 2020 5:38 PM

Nice to see the progress Mark!

Dave

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Posted by Pruitt on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 11:09 PM

AND...

Even though it will be a couple months (at least) before I start the ceilings, I've started thinking about what to DO for a ceiling?

I was planning on installing a nice flat drop ceiling throughout the basement, but in clearing the steel beams will leave the ceiling about 3" over my head. That will feel a bit closed-in, I'm thinking.

I don't like the idea of a variable-height ceiling, but the best approach may be to box out around those beams and make the rest of the ceiling several inches higher (but low enough to clear the heating ducts and such) to provide decent head height throughout the rest of the basement. I can box the beams out easily enough with 2X4's and drywall, then maybe the drop ceilings everywhere else.

I'm looking for some different viewpoints on types of ceilings, heights, etc., so don't be shy! Please share your thoughts.

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