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Multiple Staging Tracks (& access to them, perhaps helix)

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Posted by railandsail on Monday, June 18, 2018 10:06 PM

quote ...."it was inadequate should I ever need to reach in to re-rail a train on the back track"


So did you ever need to do that?

My feeling is that IF I should suffer a derailment on the inner tracks, I just have to willing to (temporarily) remove most of the trains in that staging area (in order to fix things).

(edited for some clarity)

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Posted by BMMECNYC on Tuesday, June 19, 2018 4:29 AM

railandsail

quote ...."it was inadequate should I ever need to reach in to re-rail a train on the back track"


So did you ever need to do that?

My feeling is that IF I should suffer a derailment on the inner tracks, I just have to willing to remove most of the trains in that staging area.

 

Once or twice, because i didnt install any position verification for turnouts.  The other reason i thought i might need to reach the back was to perform track maintenance/ adjustments should  thw layout change physical size due to external conditions.  Finding and fixing a closed gap is difficult enough.

That design didnt last due to a move. 

but as long as you know the limitations going in and are okay with them, its your railroad.  Everything is a trade off.

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, June 19, 2018 5:33 AM

It was a trade off as if I made the staging tracks lower I would have had to make the helix lower, and that would mean more difficult access. And I would have cut out a lot of storage under the layout that I was counting on.

I just have to be very careful with my construction of the staging area tracks, etc, in order to avoid as many problems as I can. The roadbed itself will be a very thick 3/4 plywood of good quality, acclimatized, and painted on all sides to avoid dimensional changes. It will be supported by a robust piece of steel attached to the 2x4 studs of the shed walls.

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Posted by railandsail on Thursday, June 21, 2018 8:25 PM

railandsail

Does anyone had more specific experiences with a specific one, and particularly with one for use with Pecos?
BTW I was hoping to keep all controls and wiring for the staging tracks, up on the top of the plywood deck of the staging tracks.

 

 
...from another forum suggesting use of Peco switch motors

@Neil & Al

I have a good number of those PL10 under the switch twin coil machines that I had (have) considered mounting under my staging turnouts. Interestingly they are about 3/4" deep, as would fit flush up under my 3/4 plywood staging deck. And a good size round hole could be easily drilled under each turnout. (BTW, no cork roadbed in my staging areas,...why anyway)

I did a little bit of searching and found this interesting subject thread where a forum member (Riogrande Jim) did a lot of interesting research on this very subject of utilizing Peco turnouts in his staging tracks. I need to do some more reading here.

Peco Switch Machines
http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/11/p/229460/2563136.aspx?page=1

I wonder about the top (side mount) Peco machines. Aren't they just about the same thing as the older Atlas twin coil machines? In fact wouldn't the older Atlas machines work was well??

I was disappointed in the relatively high price of those side mount Peco units,...over half the price of the turnouts themselves.

To my knowledge the primary problem with these twin coil machines was 'burning them out' by leaving the current to them on for too long a period of time via the switches utilized to control them. The CDU's eliminated these problems and made the twin coil machines reliable ??

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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, July 03, 2018 8:52 AM

Roof on 'Outhouse'

Probably going to be putting a roof on my 'outhouse' towards the end of the week. Everyday rain storms, high heat, and other house projects interfered with more work on the helix structure recently. ( a recent posting on another forum referred to my outdoor helix structure as a 'metal outhouse'.....ha...ha)

 

Can't wait to start placing roadbed inside the helix, but 2 things have to happen first; 1) constant rain storms have to diminish, 2) I'd like to get another coating of waterproofing on the roadbed pieces before subjecting them to our very high humidity levels as of late.

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Posted by railandsail on Saturday, July 14, 2018 8:10 AM

 

 

Another Wack at the Reverse Loop

Compare to my earlier post on Page 2 of this thread.

This shows a simple reverse section set-up that requires no electronic reversing sections. All the green is reversing section. Double gaps in both rails are at both legs of Turnout A. A DPDT switch aligns polarity of the rails depending on which way the turnout is thrown,

If the DPDT is a slide switch, an activator rod from its handle can move the points of the turnout.

In this diagram maroon - MAIN - and green - REVERSING -show the center lines of the tracks. RED and BLACK show the power busses for MAIN. Orange and BLUE show busses for REVERSING.

Advantages-

There is no concern about more than one train crossing the gaps, unless somebody insists on running a train thru the turnout while another train is using it in the other direction.

Simple electronics, with no dependence on circuit cards for auto-reversing.

Disadvantage:

Five balloon track plus the entire stub-end yard are on one circuit. With lots of locos "cooking" the current demand can be large. Big Booster.  OR  individual tracks can be equipped with OFF /ON toggles or pushbuttons so that only the track being used is alive at any time.

More than one booster can be used for the GREEN tracks, but that could be complicated.

DrJolS



There is no concern about more than one train crossing the gaps, unless somebody insists on running a train thru the turnout while another train is using it in the other direction.

Simple electronics, with no dependence on circuit cards for auto-reversing.
DrJolS

My question is what happens when one has a multi lash-up of locos (2-4 diesels for instance) crossing into a reverse loop? Isn't this a case of several of the locos on one circuit, while the others are on another??

I fully imagine a number of my 'staged trains' being headed up by multiple diesels. And even several by double-headed steam.

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Posted by gregc on Saturday, July 14, 2018 5:24 PM

railandsail
Isn't this a case of several of the locos on one circuit, while the others are on another??

power for the reverse loop is from the same source as the mainline.   The DPDT switch just changes the polarity.   

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by railandsail on Saturday, July 14, 2018 6:06 PM

I understand that the power is from the same source.

What confuses me is that it seems to be saying that one of the multiple lash-up locos could be looking at one polarity while the other just behind it that has 'crossed the gap' might be looking at the opposite polarity??

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Posted by gregc on Saturday, July 14, 2018 6:20 PM

that's the purpose of the DPDT switch which is mechanically coupled to the turnout throw (see image) so that the polarity of the mainline and routed path through the turnout is the same.

of course,  anything with metal wheels will cause a short when it spans the gaps when the turnout is not properly aligned coming from the reverse section.    This short will occur before the problem you're concerned with can become an issue.

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by rrinker on Sunday, July 15, 2018 11:20 AM

 In the most basic type of reverse loop, there should never be a problem. By "most basic type of reverse loo" I mean the sort where the straight route through the turnout loops back around to the diverging route. In such an arrangement, switching the loop polarity wwith the turnout makes perfect sense, no need for fancy electronics or anything. There's ZERO chance of metal wheels or trailing units crossing into the loop after the polarity is reversed - they'd derail because the switch points would be set the wrong way. You can only change the points (and thus the loop track polarity) after the entire train has passed over the turout.

 It only gets more complicated when there are multiple places to enter or exit the loop.

                                   --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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