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Interesting plan, Tupper Lake & Faust Junction

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  • Member since
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Posted by railandsail on Thursday, December 06, 2018 9:50 PM

No Homasote in Florida that I know of, and I am not attracted to the dustness of it. Have been investigating some vinyl flooring materials, but slowly come back to cork.

Don't need any such roadbed under the yard, nor the helix.

As for the full size planning paper I am finding it very helpful to be able to do this with templates and pencils, and working over a 'drafting table' as opposed to the raised shelf level of the actual layout itself,...easier to move and shift things around.

I've already found a few problem areas with my original 'living room mock-up plan', and made a few other changes/additions. And now I am not so concerned about how I transfer my mock-up plans to the real benchwork,...I will have it on a piece of paper I can simply lay down on the plywood benchwork.

I'm actually enjoying this full size mock-up of the track plan. I don't have to worry about getting the 'scale dwgs' just right, or some of the subtle details as I have it recorded FULL SCALE.

  • Member since
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  • From: Bradford, Ontario
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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, December 06, 2018 10:36 PM

railandsail
No Homasote in Florida that I know of, and I am not attracted to the dustness of it.

Without wishing to hijack the thread, I think that the supposed problems with Homasote dust are way over stated. We cut a dozen sheets of it, most of them into cookie cutter strips, for our new club layout and there was very little dust at all. The trick is which blade you use. The newer blades that are ground to a taper do not have a set to the teeth and they cut very cleanly and quickly. They slice the material as opposed to ripping it like a blade with set teeth does.

That's ultimately a moot point if you can't get the stuff to begin with.

Dave

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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, February 12, 2019 9:56 PM

Cork Roadbed

I've debated with myself for a long time as to what material(s) I might use for a roadbed under my track. I've even given serious considerations to not using any, just laying the track directly on the plywood decks.

This past weekend I attended a train show in Jacksonville where I managed to buy a whole box of Code 100 rail,..used of course. Got a pretty good deal. AND included in that box was a whole lot of cork roadbed, much of it relatively unused, or lightly used. There is certainly enough to do all of my mainlines, so I'm going for it.

I've always been a little apprehensive about the height of this roadbed, and at one time though I might look at using the thinner N scale stuff. I particularly don't like having some of my turnouts for the yard ladders trying to make that transition down 1/4" to the plywood deck level of a freight yard, etc.

So I visited our local Hobby Lobby were I found a good size roll of 1/8" sheet cork for a very reasonable price of $14. I'll be using this in the freight yard and a few other locations such as my alum ramps connecting the interior layout tracks with the external helix tracks. I will NOT be putting cork under those helix tracks at this time in my thinking.

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Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, February 12, 2019 9:58 PM

Since my layout is going to depict its city of origin on the lower level as Baltimore, I thought the recent acquisition of this poster announcing the centenary celebration of the B&O railroad (1827-1927) would be  appropriate for hanging on the front door of my 'train shed',.

the Poster 

        

the Shed

  • Member since
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  • From: In the heart of Georgia
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Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:58 AM

railandsail

Cork Roadbed

I've debated with myself for a long time as to what material(s) I might use for a roadbed under my track. I've even given serious considerations to not using any, just laying the track directly on the plywood decks.

This past weekend I attended a train show in Jacksonville where I managed to buy a whole box of Code 100 rail,..used of course. Got a pretty good deal. AND included in that box was a whole lot of cork roadbed, much of it relatively unused, or lightly used. There is certainly enough to do all of my mainlines, so I'm going for it.

I've always been a little apprehensive about the height of this roadbed, and at one time though I might look at using the thinner N scale stuff. I particularly don't like having some of my turnouts for the yard ladders trying to make that transition down 1/4" to the plywood deck level of a freight yard, etc.

So I visited our local Hobby Lobby were I found a good size roll of 1/8" sheet cork for a very reasonable price of $14. I'll be using this in the freight yard and a few other locations such as my alum ramps connecting the interior layout tracks with the external helix tracks. I will NOT be putting cork under those helix tracks at this time in my thinking.

 

Word of caution, I've used sheet cork before and its kind of a pain to glue down evenly without having some bubbles of unglued cork inevitably surfacing.  Make sure every square millimeter of plywood is covered with adhesive under the cork and that you roll the cork as you lay it down.

- Douglas

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Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9:40 AM

Any recommendations for best glue to use?, ..
1) to glue to plywood

2) to glue to alum ramps (that some of my track will use to transistion between helix and main layout)

  • Member since
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  • From: Reading, PA
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Posted by rrinker on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:00 AM

 Contact cement shoudl work for both. Be sure to clean the aluminum with something like acetone before applying the adhesive.  IMMEDIATELY before. Do note that you do not get a second chance, once the two pieces stick to each other they are stuck. I've heard of using wax paper between the two object that have had contact cement coated on them, so you can line things up and gradually pull out the wax paper, giving you a chance to check alignment before making a permanent joint.

 There should be no missing spots of glue this way, contact cement is applied to both sides and allowed to dry, then you stick them together. So if you paint the whole section of benchwork with the cement, and paint the whole piece of cork with cement, there won't be those unglued areas to bubble up once the two are brought together.

                              --Randy 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:10 AM

railandsail

Any recommendations for best glue to use?, ..
1) to glue to plywood

2) to glue to alum ramps (that some of my track will use to transistion between helix and main layout)

 

No, I don't. 

Caulk doesn't spread evenly enough, IMO.  It works well in a ribbon/bead like when laying track, but its a pain to get a 1 x 4 foot section spead evenly.

I used diluted white glue and got pockets of where the glue was not as strong as it should be.

- Douglas

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Posted by BigDaddy on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:47 AM

White glue can bleed right through the cork and stick to whatever you use to weight it down.  Use was wax paper to prevent that.

If you are asking about gluing aluminum to plywood, I would use epoxy, but liquid nails would probably work.  Liquid nails is not foam safe.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 2:55 PM

No, I was asking about cork to alum.

Wax paper trick sounds good. Perhaps the yard areas should be done in wide strips rather than one big sheet?

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  • From: In the heart of Georgia
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Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 4:48 PM

railandsail

 Perhaps the yard areas should be done in wide strips rather than one big sheet?

 

Seems like a lot of work, with inevitable bumps and rough spots at the seams.

I think it would be easier to rasp file the cork roadbed to the proper angle or use wood shims and skip the sheet.

Or buy the N scale bed for the yard tracks.  Placed closely together would also give the appearance of drainage ditches in between the tracks, if that matters.

- Douglas

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  • From: Bradford, Ontario
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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:53 PM

Our club had no problems gluing Midwest 11 1/4" x 36" cork sheets to Homasote using yellow carpenters glue. You need to make sure that the glue is applied thick enough that it will all stay wet before the cork is laid. Lay the cork starting at one end and let it 'roll' onto the surface as opposed to trying to lay the flat sheet all at once. That will reduce the possibility of air bubbles being trapped under the cork.

As far as gluing the cork down in an aluminum channel using contact cement, I think that caulking would be more forgiving because you can make adjustments after the cork is down.

My 2 Cents

Dave

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