Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Interesting plan, Tupper Lake & Faust Junction

21877 views
210 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Thursday, December 06, 2018 9:50 PM

No Homasote in Florida that I know of, and I am not attracted to the dustness of it. Have been investigating some vinyl flooring materials, but slowly come back to cork.

Don't need any such roadbed under the yard, nor the helix.

As for the full size planning paper I am finding it very helpful to be able to do this with templates and pencils, and working over a 'drafting table' as opposed to the raised shelf level of the actual layout itself,...easier to move and shift things around.

I've already found a few problem areas with my original 'living room mock-up plan', and made a few other changes/additions. And now I am not so concerned about how I transfer my mock-up plans to the real benchwork,...I will have it on a piece of paper I can simply lay down on the plywood benchwork.

I'm actually enjoying this full size mock-up of the track plan. I don't have to worry about getting the 'scale dwgs' just right, or some of the subtle details as I have it recorded FULL SCALE.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 9,712 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, December 06, 2018 10:36 PM

railandsail
No Homasote in Florida that I know of, and I am not attracted to the dustness of it.

Without wishing to hijack the thread, I think that the supposed problems with Homasote dust are way over stated. We cut a dozen sheets of it, most of them into cookie cutter strips, for our new club layout and there was very little dust at all. The trick is which blade you use. The newer blades that are ground to a taper do not have a set to the teeth and they cut very cleanly and quickly. They slice the material as opposed to ripping it like a blade with set teeth does.

That's ultimately a moot point if you can't get the stuff to begin with.

Dave

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, February 12, 2019 9:56 PM

Cork Roadbed

I've debated with myself for a long time as to what material(s) I might use for a roadbed under my track. I've even given serious considerations to not using any, just laying the track directly on the plywood decks.

This past weekend I attended a train show in Jacksonville where I managed to buy a whole box of Code 100 rail,..used of course. Got a pretty good deal. AND included in that box was a whole lot of cork roadbed, much of it relatively unused, or lightly used. There is certainly enough to do all of my mainlines, so I'm going for it.

I've always been a little apprehensive about the height of this roadbed, and at one time though I might look at using the thinner N scale stuff. I particularly don't like having some of my turnouts for the yard ladders trying to make that transition down 1/4" to the plywood deck level of a freight yard, etc.

So I visited our local Hobby Lobby were I found a good size roll of 1/8" sheet cork for a very reasonable price of $14. I'll be using this in the freight yard and a few other locations such as my alum ramps connecting the interior layout tracks with the external helix tracks. I will NOT be putting cork under those helix tracks at this time in my thinking.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, February 12, 2019 9:58 PM

Since my layout is going to depict its city of origin on the lower level as Baltimore, I thought the recent acquisition of this poster announcing the centenary celebration of the B&O railroad (1827-1927) would be  appropriate for hanging on the front door of my 'train shed',.

the Poster 

        

the Shed

  • Member since
    December, 2008
  • From: In the heart of Georgia
  • 3,056 posts
Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:58 AM

railandsail

Cork Roadbed

I've debated with myself for a long time as to what material(s) I might use for a roadbed under my track. I've even given serious considerations to not using any, just laying the track directly on the plywood decks.

This past weekend I attended a train show in Jacksonville where I managed to buy a whole box of Code 100 rail,..used of course. Got a pretty good deal. AND included in that box was a whole lot of cork roadbed, much of it relatively unused, or lightly used. There is certainly enough to do all of my mainlines, so I'm going for it.

I've always been a little apprehensive about the height of this roadbed, and at one time though I might look at using the thinner N scale stuff. I particularly don't like having some of my turnouts for the yard ladders trying to make that transition down 1/4" to the plywood deck level of a freight yard, etc.

So I visited our local Hobby Lobby were I found a good size roll of 1/8" sheet cork for a very reasonable price of $14. I'll be using this in the freight yard and a few other locations such as my alum ramps connecting the interior layout tracks with the external helix tracks. I will NOT be putting cork under those helix tracks at this time in my thinking.

 

Word of caution, I've used sheet cork before and its kind of a pain to glue down evenly without having some bubbles of unglued cork inevitably surfacing.  Make sure every square millimeter of plywood is covered with adhesive under the cork and that you roll the cork as you lay it down.

- Douglas

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9:40 AM

Any recommendations for best glue to use?, ..
1) to glue to plywood

2) to glue to alum ramps (that some of my track will use to transistion between helix and main layout)

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 26,026 posts
Posted by rrinker on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:00 AM

 Contact cement shoudl work for both. Be sure to clean the aluminum with something like acetone before applying the adhesive.  IMMEDIATELY before. Do note that you do not get a second chance, once the two pieces stick to each other they are stuck. I've heard of using wax paper between the two object that have had contact cement coated on them, so you can line things up and gradually pull out the wax paper, giving you a chance to check alignment before making a permanent joint.

 There should be no missing spots of glue this way, contact cement is applied to both sides and allowed to dry, then you stick them together. So if you paint the whole section of benchwork with the cement, and paint the whole piece of cork with cement, there won't be those unglued areas to bubble up once the two are brought together.

                              --Randy 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    December, 2008
  • From: In the heart of Georgia
  • 3,056 posts
Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:10 AM

railandsail

Any recommendations for best glue to use?, ..
1) to glue to plywood

2) to glue to alum ramps (that some of my track will use to transistion between helix and main layout)

 

No, I don't. 

Caulk doesn't spread evenly enough, IMO.  It works well in a ribbon/bead like when laying track, but its a pain to get a 1 x 4 foot section spead evenly.

I used diluted white glue and got pockets of where the glue was not as strong as it should be.

- Douglas

  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • 5,235 posts
Posted by BigDaddy on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:47 AM

White glue can bleed right through the cork and stick to whatever you use to weight it down.  Use was wax paper to prevent that.

If you are asking about gluing aluminum to plywood, I would use epoxy, but liquid nails would probably work.  Liquid nails is not foam safe.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 2:55 PM

No, I was asking about cork to alum.

Wax paper trick sounds good. Perhaps the yard areas should be done in wide strips rather than one big sheet?

  • Member since
    December, 2008
  • From: In the heart of Georgia
  • 3,056 posts
Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 4:48 PM

railandsail

 Perhaps the yard areas should be done in wide strips rather than one big sheet?

 

Seems like a lot of work, with inevitable bumps and rough spots at the seams.

I think it would be easier to rasp file the cork roadbed to the proper angle or use wood shims and skip the sheet.

Or buy the N scale bed for the yard tracks.  Placed closely together would also give the appearance of drainage ditches in between the tracks, if that matters.

- Douglas

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 9,712 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:53 PM

Our club had no problems gluing Midwest 11 1/4" x 36" cork sheets to Homasote using yellow carpenters glue. You need to make sure that the glue is applied thick enough that it will all stay wet before the cork is laid. Lay the cork starting at one end and let it 'roll' onto the surface as opposed to trying to lay the flat sheet all at once. That will reduce the possibility of air bubbles being trapped under the cork.

As far as gluing the cork down in an aluminum channel using contact cement, I think that caulking would be more forgiving because you can make adjustments after the cork is down.

My 2 Cents

Dave

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, March 22, 2019 2:11 PM

Reverse Loops

Sorry I do realize that track plans I present here are incomplete, but I do think there is enough of them to estimate the number of problems I may encounter with reverse loops. Anyone care to comment?

Basically it would appear to me that I have a number of situations where tracks are looping around, BUT not coming back upon themselves, RATHER they are becoming the other side of the double mainlines??
 

Bottom Deck Track Plan

....just going to post the dwg this morning and I will add some text later this weekend. If you have been following this blog you will notice I changed the location of a number of 'scenes'

 

New Top Deck Track Plan

Trans-Continental Theme

I'm at the point now that my new layout plan has progressed significantly past the TL&F Junction plan, the one that originally inspired me. With that in mind I seriously considered starting a new subject thread titled “the Trans-Continental Connector, East meets West”, and proceeding with new postings and layout discussions under that title.

But there is so much material already contained in this subject thread that will have relevance with the new plan, I will just continue on this path for the moment.

My hopes that a more professional or inspired computer trackplan designer would come along and help me with ideas/images of alternative track plans for the 2 main decks of my layout have been delayed again, ….maybe as much as another 6 months.

So I had better get started on some new ideas myself. I sketched this up just recently for the very top deck
TOP DECK, Idea #1

 

I previously suggested that the bottom deck would represent Balt and east coast, and the top deck would represent LA and the west coast. Well that is NOT going to work. My debate centered around the fact that if I had the entire upper deck representing the west coast and primarily a source of container trains,...how was I going to get to run all my beautiful steam engines up there if i remained true to the idea that steam engines didn't pull container trains??

I think I will do 2 things, the second one most important,....
1) Like you I will run some container trains with steam engines,

2) I have divided up my upper deck in half,...one side will represent the LA area and source of container trains headed to the east coast (lower level), and the other half will be coal mines, timber, etc with freight cars that would have been pulled by steam engines. There will be a 'hidden track' behind the west coast scene so the good old steam trains can pass over to the other half of the upper deck without having to pass in front of the Santa Fe station and the stacked containers/ docks/ships.

 

That 'hidden track' is on the left had side in the dwg and likely accomplished with some sort of scenic blocker just tall enough to hide that steam train, and camouflaged by being painted with ships & cranes that blend in with the container yard.

The other mainlines and sidings out in front of of the Santa Fe station and the container yard will be for those diesel powered trains that are pulling long container trains or passenger trains. One of those 'sidings' out front should be reserved to hold a full consist of the infamous Santa Fe passenger train (I've got both the Walthers set and some nice MTH cars).

 

That inside corner (in front of the station) could well serve 2 functions.

1) A parking area for some of the nice Santa Fe diesels I have

2) A big fueling and sanding area for those diesels getting ready to make the trip east.

3) I had thought there might be a loco maintenance building somewhere here, but it would not be a good idea to cram it in here ,...how about down that side at the other end,...in an area of that 'continuous loop track'? There might even be some more extensive fuel oil tanks down there.??

 

Across the entrance-way bridge on the right had side of the layout is a fairly big piece of real estate that is open to suggestions.?

That right hand side will represent 'industries/scenes' from the middle of the country or the Appalachians. Some sort of coal mine is needed to fill up coal hauling trains and bring some to the steel mill. I just randomly placed that coal mine scene in there , but I like some of its trackage and non-liner design.

 

On this upper level I am proposing to put some logging tracks and trains down that peninsula. There might be a very tight loop at the free end of the peninsula for the short logging locos to run. Or it might be just a back and forth operation for them. They will bring logs out to the saw mill scene at the trunk end of the peninsula. I have the whole Walthers saw mill kit(s) and would like to make this scene some sort of transfer of logs to cut product that would be loaded onto mainline log cars and center-beam loaded cars, and a number of other wood carrying cars ( I have quite a variety).

 

Then to just throw a curved ball at the situation. I've actually thought that these two sides could be reversed? The upper deck on that left hand side is a little bit deeper than the one on the right.

That one upper loop might well reconnect with itself and present a 'reverse loop'

 

(sorry for such a long posting, I just find it more 'complete' to include the 'background material', rather than expecting the reader to find previous postings themselves)

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Saturday, May 25, 2019 6:58 AM

Yesterday I finally started cutting plywood for some of the multiple decks of my new layout. Started out with staging level decks. Surprisingly I was able to get most of my 3 area staging cut from only 2 full sheets of 4x8 foot sheets of plywood. Photos coming later today perhaps.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Monday, June 03, 2019 8:50 AM

So this was my original 'mock up' of some of my staging tracks,...

First I had to assembly all of the Peco mediums together in a firm manner so they could be moved around as a group in that pinwheel ladder configuration. Then I went searching for how I could make them line up correctly with the shelf I was planning down each side. I found I could now get 6 tracks down the side in a14" depth shelf, with a 2 1/8" center between tracks.

 

 

None of the connecting tracks are less than 24" radi.

Then I went to mocking up the center peninsula staging that includes 6 more tracks on a 13 inch wide shelf located under the 24" peninsula main deck above it.

All thet urnouts in these photos are Peco mediums
 

 

Then I drew in a proposed curve line that would represent the outer edge of the staging track shelf in the area of the pinwheel ladder.

 

I'm hoping to rig up some 'fixtures' mounted on that strip of shelf just outside of the turnouts that will allow a cable type manual operation of the individual turnouts, ie, wire within a plastic tube that would come up to a small panel mounted of the front face of the main deck's edge at the front of the aisle.

 *********************************

So yesterday I began to cut my plywood decks for the staging areas. Going to cut all of them, align and fit them together, drill holes for bolts that will bond them to the steel box frames mounted on the walls. Then I will remove the wood decks and drill all the countersink holes, then paint/waterproof those plywood deck pieces and set them aside for a little while till I drill the location holes for the main deck bolts just above staging tracks. 

After the main deck bolt holes are located, those sheets will be removed to the outside and painted/sealed. While those are drying I will be laying track onto the staging decks. 

It feels good to finally be cutting and placing the decks into place,...INSIDE the shed.

 

 

 

 

 

So here are my Thomson waterseal painted staging deck sections. Just as a quick experiment today I took one piece and tried to coat it a second time. It did NOT readily accept the second coat. Appears the surface is resisting any penetration by a second coat.
 

I suspect in time (proper FULL drying time of the first coat) that a second color coat of paint could be applied? And I believe if I were to do so I would utilize and oil based paint rather than latex.
 

 

 

 

BTW here is a cart full of different products I collected up over the past year,...from estate sales, wrong color matches at retail stores, etc, etc

 

 

 

 

Efficient cutting of plywood.
I cut all 3 staging area deck pieces (both full length sides of shed, plus peninsula) out of just 2 full sheets of 4x8 plywood,...and only had this much waste material,..pretty good !

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Monday, June 03, 2019 8:53 AM

Trimming the Waterfront Scene

 

I had posted earlier in this discussion,...

My Waterfront Scene
I have this WONDERFULL waterfront scene I purchased from an estate sale. Perhaps I could place it at the very end of my peninsula on the lower level. …..the more modern stuff (containers,etc) in the first portion of the peninsula, then this 'older style' waterfront at the 'pointy end' ?
http://www.modelrailroadforums.com/forum/index.php?threads/waterfront-harbor-s

cene-buildings-barges-tugs-detailed.24497/page-2#post-313942

 

Might have to modify its footprint a littlbit. Trouble is it would set a tone of detail that I COULD NEVER match anywhere else on the layout....:)

 

I made a scale image of this overhead shot,...then placed it around a few spots on the layout dwg

 

 

 

******************************************************

 

I've been VERY concerned with cutting up (trimming) this great piece of modeling, but yesterday I had to bit-the-bullet and give it a try. I needed to cut an end off of the scene that had 3 small buildings on it,..to make room for the double track mainlines that will cross behind it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I used my trusty old Swedish made hand saw as I needed to get 3 layers of foam and 1/2" plywood.

 

Now I will need to get to a couple of other edges, AND figure out how I am going to place it on/in the layout deck such as to be able to easily remove it when working on the brick factory behind it, and whatever I end up placing in the corner of the layout on the very top deck.

BTW, I'll find another place on the layout to utilize those 3 small buildings,...particularly 'Rocky's Tavern'....ha...ha

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, June 07, 2019 8:34 AM

More Plywood Deck Cutting

 

After some trimming of that waterfront scene I figured I best get on with how I was going to fit it into its corner piece of plywood deck. I'm desiring to make the waterfront scene 'removable' at times so I can work on the structure that will behind it, and those structures i'll end up putting in that same corner on the very top deck (still to be determined).

Some plywood deck cutting and fitting so far,...

 

 

With paper template laid over plywood,..

 

 

Here you can see the good clearance between staging deck and main deck at door's entrance,..

 

 

Steel Mill corner piece & its outer frame support, ...

 

 

 

 

The reason for the 2 different beams, angle iron beam & alum extrusion. is that i wanted the alum beam to exist where I intend to build a work station under the deck there.
 

With all these multiple beams at the same height in the room I am able to slide the big, heavy 3/4" plywood sheets around to different positions to get access to items underneath, or to trim them, etc.

 

  • Member since
    December, 2008
  • From: In the heart of Georgia
  • 3,056 posts
Posted by Doughless on Friday, June 07, 2019 9:32 AM

Looking good Brian.  It looks like you have a few aluminum channel legs to support the wider lower deck.  IIRC, you are going to let the upper decks merely attach to the channel along the back edge and let the front edge float. 

I think plywood is sold in 12 foot lengths in some markets.  You could cut 2 pieces into a u shape for your decks and take advantage of the support offered by the corners of the building and the two directions of the channels.  My thinking is that one long piece of plywood cut to shape would be inherently stronger than two pieces butted together.

Overall, I don't think it would be too obtrusive to simply have another piece of long channel supporting the front edge of the decks.  If you tuck it back under and away from the immediate edge, you shouldn't see it.

- Douglas

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, June 07, 2019 9:49 PM

I actually have some very interesting aluminum extrusions I can use to stabilize the outer edges of the cantilevered upper decks,...alum for its light weight. These extrusions have a shape that lend a rigidity to themselves, and just so happen to have a channel that will hold those LED lights I used on the ceiling of my shed.

...another find at my local metal scrap yard.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Sunday, June 09, 2019 12:14 AM

I was doing some tweaking on areas of the main deck, and playing with ideas as to the reinforcements and ledges to support the waterfront scene. Hope to finish that tomorrow after one more gluing stage.

 

That steel beam lying on TOP of the deck is being utilized to locate where to drill the bolts holes in the plywood for bolting to the support beam underneath. I decided this was much easier than drilling the holes up from underneath,...and I did not have to remove the staging beams in order to get the drill in there from underneath.

 

 

Those white items under the edges of where the waterfront scene will sit in are just 2" square alum tubes they utilize for screened in porches down here in FL. Had to glue a little 1/4' wood spacer onto their bottoms so the next 'ledges' are the correct height to match the depth of the existing waterfront scene.

Played around with clamping a few pieces of random plywood on the very upper deck beams just see what it might look like. I plan on going ahead and cutting/fitting the upper deck plywoods prior to any track laying.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Sunday, June 09, 2019 7:35 PM

Fitted Waterfront Scene

It fit in my cut out area pretty good. It sits on ledges of 3/8 plywood I provided off of the aluminum beams I provided on 3 sides of the scene,....easy in and out.

 

 

 

 

The existing scene had about a 3" drop down to water level, so I had to support it from ledges on the bottom WITHOUT taking up too much space that might interfere with the staging tracks below.

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, June 12, 2019 11:32 AM

Center Peninsula Deck

Took a day off for some other projects, then yesterday I cut out the 24" wide piece for the peninsula deck, and the 24" piece for the very upper deck in the back.

 

 

 

 

Might be hard to tell from these photos, but I feel the aisles are plenty wide for a single operator.

 

And the access to the staging area below this peninsula is superb,...

 

BTW, the very tip of that staging deck is only rough cut at this time, until I test out the clearances for someone a little 'thicker' than me.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, June 12, 2019 10:24 PM

Front Edge Support, combined with LED lighting tube

Doughless

Overall, I don't think it would be too obtrusive to simply have another piece of long channel supporting the front edge of the decks.  If you tuck it back under and away from the immediate edge, you shouldn't see it.

 

 

I thought you might find this interesting idea I have for the very top deck's outer edges. If I were to chose a beam to add extra support to the 'free' outer edges of the upper decks I would like to have something light-weight. I found this interesting aluminum extrusion at my local metal scrap yard.

As I played around with how I might mount it,... I discovered I could fit those tubular LED lights in it, the ones I had used on the upper ceiling to light the whole room..

 

 

 

 

Then mounted upside down to the front edge of the plywood deck,..

 

I even have another channel there that might be used to keep the buss wiring for the upper deck from hanging down?

 

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Thursday, June 13, 2019 10:04 PM

Upper Deck

I was getting ready to start cutting the plywood decks for my final and upper level of my 3 level layout. Something kept telling me I should have a look at the height of that blast furnace I had previously acquired before proceeding forward with the piece that was going to be overhead of it,....the Santa Fe station and SF diesel engine maintenance building.

 

This is what I discovered. The blast furnace tower was taller than I thought,...a good bit over the 20” I had set as the distance between my main level tracks and my upper level tracks,..

 

 

 

 

 

 

I spent much of the day contemplating what approach I should take. I finally came to the conclusion I was going to have to 'abbreviate' the piece of deck over the blast furnace,...and this would require my moving the Santa Fe station, Santa Fe maintenance building, and the 'west coast' container facility over to the other side of the layout/shed.

So now that Santa Fe station will move over to that corner across the entrance way and be over the waterfront/brick factory scene.

Basically I am going to have to redraw that upper deck plan, and concurrently try to arrive at more definitive arrangement for the coal mid and lumber mill scenes.

At least now my 2 opposing cites (Balt east coast, LA west coast) will be in diametrically opposed corners of the room,...on different decks.

 

...back to the drawing board

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 9,712 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Friday, June 14, 2019 12:44 AM

Why not 'abbreviate' the blast furnace? To me, having a structure from one level poking its head up into a second level would be disconcerting.

My 2 Cents

Dave

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, June 14, 2019 7:22 AM

hon30critter

Why not 'abbreviate' the blast furnace? To me, having a structure from one level poking its head up into a second level would be disconcerting.

My 2 Cents

Dave

 

That thought entered my mind, and perhaps I will have to give it more consideration. I think I will let it shimmer this weekend while I go forward with a few other projects.

One other thought that arose was that having the blast furnace 'out front' of other structures back under a completely covered upper deck might be a bit 'claustrophobic'. That prompted my thoughts of abbreviating that upper deck in the corner, and putting something a little less 'busy' in that upper corner.

And fortunately I had never yet made plans on the other corner of the upper level.

  • Member since
    December, 2008
  • From: In the heart of Georgia
  • 3,056 posts
Posted by Doughless on Friday, June 14, 2019 7:43 AM

railandsail

 

 
 

One other thought that arose was that having the blast furnace 'out front' of other structures back under a completely covered upper deck might be a bit 'claustrophobic'. That prompted my thoughts of abbreviating that upper deck in the corner, and putting something a little less 'busy' in that upper corner.

 

That's a good observation, IMO.  A small layout looks larger if you keep the taller structures along the wall and the shorter structures up front.  Maybe a smaller tall structure in one or two places on the layout to break up the overall sight lines, but something massive like a blast furnace would probably work better next to a wall.

- Douglas

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Saturday, June 15, 2019 10:05 AM

There have been times in the past when I considered placing the steel mill / blast furnace in the 'background of the scene' (back against the backdrop images),...
Steel Mill Scene in a Corner

....but I have decided against this in favor of my current location. I just didn't see how I was going to place it in a corner where I also needed reasonable large radius mainline tracks,..2 of them.  Perhaps if I had a bigger layout things could have been arranged better, but I am working with a fairly small layout.

Having it 'outfront' at the edge will allow folks to get a better view of the various cars utilized in making steel. And I think my 'mirrors' will make the scene appear more massive (maybe 2 blast furnace in a row). Please excuse those temp mirrors I show in the pics, I did not have any plain ones at this time,...only the decorative ones I had salvaged off an old house remodel job.

 

 

 

 

 

And the double mainline tracks will run behind the steel mill unseen for a short period,...so hopefully they will not appear to be running right next to, or in between, the blast furnaces.

 

I'll abbreviate that upper deck just over the blast furnace so it can attain its full height. I just need to figure out what I might place in that upper back corner?....a refinery and tank farm have come to mind??

 

BTW, I had hopes my 2 mill image might look a little like this wink

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Sunday, June 16, 2019 10:00 AM

Experiment with moving Steel Mill to upper deck

Yesterday I decided to make a few experiments with changing some locations of some structures. A biggy was relocating the blast furnace/steel mill scene to the upper deck. So I grabbed a spare piece of plywood decking I had and placed it in that upper corner. I tried to set the blast furnace as far back as I could while still maintaining the fairly large radius curved mainlines behind it. In order to not hind the blast furnace behind the rolling mill I had to locate the rolling mill behind like this.

 

 

 

 

At the 60" height of my upper deck the structure appeared more inspiring, as it was likely in real life. And of course the full height of the tower was accommodated under the ceiling of my shed. I determined I would likely cut that upper deck plywood back to just in front of that slag car track in front of the BF.
 

I experimented a little with the mirrors that worked best when the BF was angled just a little.
 

Not totally sold on this idea yet, particularly when I would have to redo all my previous plans down below, including the lifting bridge images that would not go well with the Santa Fe station just across entranceway.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 1,465 posts
Posted by railandsail on Thursday, June 20, 2019 3:09 PM

I sat and looked at that possible new location for the steel mill,...and I have decided against it. I will locate it back down on the lower level as I originally intended.

When I thought about this move I had to move the Santa Fe station scene over to the opposite corner of the upper level. I am going to stay with this decision.

I am already looking for what industry I might put up above the steel mill. I am entertaining a coal mining scene, a refinery/tank farm, or even the container loading scene that is associated with the west coast portion of the layout.
 

My mind is a-buzz, so I had to entertain myself today with just making some changes to my 'metal reinforcement plates' that join the metal benchwork beams,...in 2 places where I had originally utilize 3/4 plywood gussets. My thoughts were that those thick wood gusset plates could interfere with some scenery items on the main deck,...like for instance the Balt city flats area in that back corner. That city scene may have to be very movable to get at any derailments behind/under it.

Oh joy and cheers for going back to the drawing table frownangry

BTW I did have an encouraging note today. Over behind my freight yard scene where I had included a double crossover Shinohara turnout  (warned about possible troubles), I found that I have room enough for 2 in-line single Shinohara crossovers.

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!