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Interesting plan, Tupper Lake & Faust Junction

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  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,453 posts
Posted by bearman on Sunday, March 25, 2018 7:32 AM

Ok, as long as you dont have to wory about the buidling codes.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 736 posts
Posted by railandsail on Sunday, March 25, 2018 7:43 AM

Other than electrical installation, which I had help with from a fellow who works as an electrical inspector for the county,...I was restricted to using a shed with NO wood siding,..only metal. That was due to fire potential due to close proximity to trailer home next door, and that was a requirement from the trailer park itself.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Phoenix, AZ
  • 1,453 posts
Posted by bearman on Sunday, March 25, 2018 7:54 AM

Here in Phoenix, if you put up a shed and run ANY utilities to it, you need to get a building permit and you need to have the construction inspected by the city.

Bear "It's all about having fun."

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 736 posts
Posted by railandsail on Sunday, March 25, 2018 1:48 PM

There are virtually NO basements in Florida, so there are many, many sheds. Handi-house is one particular builder, and you get a certificate with the shed that satisfies most jurisdictions concerned building codes, and applicable hurricane strap usage in the constuction of the shed. Then it must be 'ground anchored' upon installation.
https://www.handihouse.com/

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 736 posts
Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, April 04, 2018 8:07 AM

Narrow Shelfs, Industry Sides, Multiple Trackage

A number of folks have critiqued this modified Tupper Lake layout design I am proposing as not having enough trackside diversions, and instead just too much train running tracks. I offer this quote and photos from another subject thread on another forum,...

**********************

I have a different approach, just for the sake of discussion I'll explain. I go to great lengths to get the tracks to match the prototype as much as possible, so that my moves will match the prototype's. Here is a map, made by a guy that used to work as a conductor at the Monsanto plant that is on my layout: 

My compression is making the tracks shorter, especially the ones that curve around and into the backdrop. If I could make this area 3' deep, I could match those tracks better, but I can't so they're shorter. They are, however, in about the right place in relation to one another, all shortened about the same percentage, and, most importantly, the moves to switch them are the same

Another guy that worked down here for the railroad has visited since I got these tracks down, and he recognizes the tracks without the labels on them. When he describes the work he did, he can follow my tracks and tell me what cars went where. THAT is my goal. Buildings are just window dressing to me. The tracks are where its at. 

 

Because those old photos of my layout look funny to me, here is a more recent photo: 

There, that's better. ;-)  

Randy
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  • Member since
    December, 2008
  • From: In the heart of Georgia
  • 2,539 posts
Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, April 04, 2018 10:06 AM

I dont know about track side diversions.  To my eye, multiple tracks inches apart from each other look realistic when the whole thing is representing an industrial area of maybe a half mile of distance.  Not so much when multiple tracks inches apart are suppossed to be representing points 20 miles from each other. 

 

- Douglas

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 736 posts
Posted by railandsail on Tuesday, April 17, 2018 11:19 PM

Train Shed interior

Finished the lining of my shed's interior this afternoon. Been a very slow process as I let myself get interrupted numerous times with designing ideas for the staging tracks, the addition to the helix for the access track, the gathering of materials for a new style brackets for the dbl-deck shelves, etc, etc.

Hope to start cutting and welding metal for the brackets for the lower main shelf and staging shelf, and actually mounting some of those very soon. Next will be to cut the shelfs for the staging level and laying the track and turnouts on it.

A little problem arose on my new helix design. I was seeking out a metal fabricator that could bend me a couple of big circular hoops of angle iron. He came back to me with too high of a price, so I need to seek out another outfit, or modify my design.

Saving those corners to do later when I decide whether to make them circular or square.

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 736 posts
Posted by railandsail on Sunday, May 06, 2018 7:37 AM

Some Updates

I'll add a few updates to this subject thread as they are spread out on a few individual other threads

Multiply Staging Tracks

Steel Frames to Support Plywood Shelves

I am pretty much set on this design, and I am already cutting out the roadbeds for the helix that will serve this area. The framing support for the plywood roadbed for this staging level has changed and has simplified in construction. I expect to start cutting some plywood for the staging level very soon, painting it for water/humidity resistance, and mounting track on it. It will still be removable in large sections so work can be completed on main level just above it.

Helix
Construction of the external helix itself should start within a week or 2. Just this weekend I have been excavating the dirt behind the shed in order to pour the concrete pad that will exist under the helix. (is this what model railroading is like,...digging dirt and pouring concrete...blah)
 

Thru Wall Tunnels

I'm going to start to cut holes in the back wall of the shed,...for tracks that will serve that external helix. Those holes thru the wall will likely be 'tunneled'  thru using plastic drain spout sections. I found some nice rectangular rain spout that will accomodate a single consist train, (the one on the right). The other section is PVC fence post. Both are 4 inches high, and quite stiff due to the shape

 

Steel Mill Corner & Balt City Corner

I've pretty much decided that the helix end of the layout will look like this,....with the steel scene in the right hand corner, the turntable somewhat like depicted, a center track feeding the peninsula, then the left corner a scene of Balt depicted by thin/shallow city buildings, and paintings on backdrop.

 

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • 736 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, May 18, 2018 9:36 PM

General concept & How I arrived at it

I just like Model Trains,...of all sorts....the scale miniaturization.

I'm particularly fond of steam engines, and particularly the large ones. I'm a fan of C&O, B&O, NW, etc, etc.

And as a kid of course I had the ubiquitous Santa Fe diesel engine,...those famous worldwide recognizable colors.

I had recently returned from Asia and was living in the Wash-Balt area when a company in Balt called Life Like made the bold move to really upgrade plastic trains to nice scale models. They introduced their Proto 2000 line. They introduced a whole line of detailed diesel locos, then they introduced that superb 2-8-8-2 steam engine.....WOW. They set a standard in plastic scale model trains that the others quickly followed. Bachmann, Athearn, etc all jumped on the band wagon to introduce their premium lines as well. Plastic detailing became an art that eventually was a rival to brass locos.

 

I was collecting a little of everything. I would buy some stuff that eventually got superseded by even better stuff, so I would attend the Great Scale Train Show in Balt and sell off older stuff and try to upgrade to the better stuff coming out. I would visit John Glabbs little brass shop in Laural, Md, and droll over the brass locos which I considered beyond my reach, but then look what was coming out in plastic a few months later.
 

By this time I had collected quite a few steam engines of various lines, and principle a number of diesels from Santa Fe.

So when it came to planning my new layout, how could I choose just one time frame, or location, if I wanted to collect and run all of those type trains? I wanted to run steam and diesel, and I wanted to run east coast and west coast lines.....on one layout??

I've decided my trains are going to run from the east coast to the west coast,...Balt to Calif. I'll call it the Continental Connector. Balt will be on the lower deck and Calif will be on the upper deck.
 

Since I am not a stickler on time frames I'll be able to run both modern and older style freight and passenger cars on my layout, and of course steam and diesels. I'm going to have lots of staging that will present any number of variations,...including a few European trains I've collected. Yes it won't be prototypical, but it will be fun. And I hope to get a considerable amount of industry in this space as well.

I will need a big dia helix to get those trains between decks, so to save on interior space, I have decided to place that helix structure external to the shed in which the layout is built. Most all the parts of the helix structure are built, and assembly will begin in the next two weeks. Within 3days (working between spring rain storms here in FL) I hope to pour the concrete pad that will exist below the helix structure hung off the rear of the train shed.

Then the shelfing will begin inside the shed,...plywood and metal benchwork is all assembled.

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