Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Freelance Cheverie Mountain Railroad HO-Scale Layout

9564 views
149 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Thursday, May 18, 2017 11:47 AM

Here is the motor and gearbox that will be mounted inside the rock. This motor will operate from a hopper car on the adjacent track. When a hopper car is in the right location, the motor will activate a screw conveyor mounted on top of the rock and automatically fill the hopper with ore. A pilot light will come on when the hopper is in the right spot. When the hopper is moved slightly by the locomotive, the light turns off and the motor and conveyor stop.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Thursday, May 18, 2017 12:07 PM

Concealing sensors and surveillance equipment inside beach rocks and driftwood is technology that my company developed - I owned the company. This is also one of the reasons I bought 14.5 acres of prime land on the Bay of Fundy with deeded access to the rocky beach with huge cliffs, caves, and lots more. Details on how the hopper communicates with the rock are proprietary to my company and cannot be disclosed. That being said, you will see it work.

If you Google Access Nova Scotia's Registry of Joint Stocks and search for Intrinsic Defence and Intelligence Enterprises you will find my company. Once I developed successful products, I requested the company be revoked.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,451 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Thursday, May 18, 2017 12:38 PM

OldSchoolScratchbuilder

So far, this is mostly about rock collecting expeditions and little else about actually building a model railroad layout. In one of your earlier threads, you made reference to "lifetime testing" and when I asked what that meant, I never got a response from you.

Now, you make a statement like "build an HO rock face, and pass electricity right through it to run an electromechanical system for animation". What does this mean? 

You suggest that interest may be low because no one has built a live layout before. What does that mean? What is a live layout?

My only point is that the all of this could be more meaningful to other modelers if we had a better sense of what all of this means and how you plan to operate this layout.

Rich  

You lack patience grasshopper. 

Oh well, nothing like having your questions not answered.

Good luck with whatever it is you are doing.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    January, 2010
  • From: Chi-Town
  • 6,764 posts
Posted by zstripe on Thursday, May 18, 2017 4:49 PM

richhotrain
Oh well, nothing like having your questions not answered. Good luck with whatever it is you are doing. Rich

Did You get the ''brush-off'' there ''grasshopper"? 

I remain...''The Shadow''. heh, heh!

Frankie

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,451 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Thursday, May 18, 2017 5:27 PM

zstripe
 
richhotrain
Oh well, nothing like having your questions not answered. Good luck with whatever it is you are doing. Rich

I remain...''The Shadow''. heh, heh!

Frankie 

Frankie, The Shadow, you are one. You have the power to cloud men's minds so that they cannot see you. Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men. The Shadow knows. Frankie knows. The grasshopper knows. But, does the dude from Nova Scotia know? He may not know. But I know. And you know. heh,heh! Alien

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Thursday, May 18, 2017 6:03 PM

Sun and heat of the day solidified the clay in 2 hours! Ready to make the train talk to the rock this evening instead of tomorrow. Next stop is my electronics lab on the second floor.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Thursday, May 18, 2017 6:49 PM

My electronics laboratory has everything I need to create unique wiring solutions for my entire layout. I have been designing electronic circuits since 1976 when I joined the Canadian military. Electronics was my job.

I use a very precise Kato Power Pack for the testbed tracks (DC), a top of the line switching mode DC power supply for auxilliary devices, for example, this motor-in-the-rock only needs 2 volts max. The motor is a low-voltage, low-rpm and high-torque design owing in part to it's gearbox. On the layout, every piece of track is wired so for the demo I will have two electric lines and one electromechanical line. I am working with a live load of gypsum from Windsor, NS from my real layout area.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Thursday, May 18, 2017 7:02 PM

By wiring every piece of track, I can use the connections for diagnostics or I can change my driving point to any piece of track on the entire layout. All electrical connections to each track will be solderless using spring-loaded micro contacts (about 3 mm length when not compressed). They are called contact probes and I buy them online from Mouser Electronics.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Friday, May 19, 2017 4:52 AM

All trackbeds in my layout begin with a Cheverie clay base. On top of the base I install large slabs of Walton shale and form it with sloping sides and flat top. This is shown in the picture. The shale is fixed in place with Scenic Cement by Woodland Scenics. Note that the motor is resting on a wooden platform made from West Jeddore driftwood. I buy the motors on Amazon.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Friday, May 19, 2017 5:22 AM

Field trip to Walton this morning to take photos, measure cliff heights, and more, for scenic development on my layout Panel 3. My field equipment for this work includes a very accurate topographical map, a hand-held laser rangefinder with a 230' range, a hand-held Garmin GPS, my LowePro backpack filled with geology equipment, high-end waterproof Bushnell 7x50 binoculars with built in bearing readout (I used one of these at sea for many years), and a sketchbook. High tide is right about now, so receeding water when I arrive will be perfect for many hours on the coastline. Weather is ideal.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Friday, May 19, 2017 12:41 PM

Took detailed measurements of the inside and outside of the Walton lighthouse this morning. It will be scratchbuilt using West Jeddore driftwood and will appear in the prototype forum after I have my new bandsaw delivered and installed at the end of the month.

 

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Friday, May 19, 2017 12:44 PM

Also took lots of photos and measurements of the amazing rock face under the lighthouse to model as scenery.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Friday, May 19, 2017 1:20 PM

View from another angle.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Friday, May 19, 2017 1:25 PM

Lots of pyrites were collected this morning. These samples will be crushed, separated from the shale, then used to make conductive ground cover for special effects. They have been cleaned and are drying in the heat of the day.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,451 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Friday, May 19, 2017 2:55 PM

Since you are an old school scratch builder, have you considered handlaying your own track? You could use that West Jeddore driftwood for the ties.

Rich 

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Friday, May 19, 2017 5:30 PM

Careful hand-crushing yield for pyrite/shale was nearly 100%. Four grades by particle sizes were separated. Five pieces were crushed, the rest this long holiday weekend.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Friday, May 19, 2017 6:25 PM

I have built miniature radio transmitters in the past. Going to try and use pyrite particles to make an operational HO-scale ground plane antenna for a high frequency radio transmitter. If successful, I'll build a small radio station on the layout and receive on one of my antique radios. Broadcast news will be about the mines/quarries and train yards/stations in the layout.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,451 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Saturday, May 20, 2017 4:19 AM

richhotrain

Since you are an old school scratch builder, have you considered handlaying your own track? You could use that West Jeddore driftwood for the ties.

Rich 

 

OK, sorry grasshoppers, but apparently the OP has no interest in our suggestions or in answering any of our questions. Nevertheless, I maintain that this would be a very cool idea.

As a professed scratch builder, how difficult would it be to master the basic skills required to build your own track? With West Jeddore driftwood quite plentiful, it could be used to make the ties. For all of the other projects on our retired physicist friend's list, I think that this would be the coolest part of the layout.

Here is a link to the Fast Tracks web site:

http://www.handlaidtrack.com/

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Saturday, May 20, 2017 5:37 AM

The course shale track bed that I installed yesterday is now firmly in place. I applied Scenic Cement from Woodland Scenics and as you can see in the picture, nothing falls off the foam when I hold it vertical or upsidedown. Will apply a finer shale particle size today and do the same spray down.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Saturday, May 20, 2017 8:01 AM

Railbed is ready for a second layer of particulate Walton shale. Getting ready for a field trip to Cape Blomidon area to take photos, and collect scenery materials. Later ...

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Southeast Texas
  • 4,769 posts
Posted by mobilman44 on Saturday, May 20, 2017 2:59 PM

I'm having a hard time reconciling the fact that you would go to so much effort to put down rocks and ballast and groundcover, and yet use sectional track - and code 100 to boot!

To be consistent with your ground cover efforts, I would suggest handlaid code 70 track, which of course means putting in individual ties and rails and spikes.  Of course using a rock base (most MRs use cork or homosote or manufactured rubber type roadbeds) is going to give you a heck of a challenge in getting the trackage aligned and level and solidly in place. 

I'm not saying it can't be done, or even shouldn't be done, but the fact is, "the wheel has already been invented and improved upon many times over".

ENJOY  !

 

Mobilman44

 

Living in southeast Texas, modeling the "postwar" Santa Fe and Illinois Central 

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Saturday, May 20, 2017 4:18 PM

The Code 100 is for the small demo hopper loader and layout planning. Haven't made a choice yet. I get as much Atlas code 100 track as I want for free so I use it to waste permanently on demonstrators like this metal scrapyard. Have piles of the old brass track as well, which I cut up for the brass metal. Can't use code 70 with my spring-loaded solderless contacts. Code 70 is not an option. Using salty West Jeddore driftwood was suggested - that's asking for electrical trouble. The inside and underside of the rails, and the ties, will have embedded sensors and actuators in them for many unique special effects and animations (eg. sparks). My final track selection will depend on the results from all of my demonstrators. Sensors include Hall effect, acoustic, electromagnetic, optical, and IR to name some examples. I developed sensors and actuators for the Canadian Navy and our allies during my career as a defence physicist.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Saturday, May 20, 2017 5:10 PM

In 1995 I was invited to write a review article on piezoelectric materials for sensors and actuators with the CEO of Sensor Technology Ltd. and one of his engineers. We were chosen as world leaders in this field. The reference is as follows if you are interested in piezo materials:

"Piezoelectric Materials and their Applications," D.F. Jones, S.E. Prasad, and J.B. Wallace, in Advanced Ceramic Materials: Applications of Advanced Materials in a High-Tech Society I, Key Engineering Materials Volumes 122-124, Ed. Hamid Mostaghaci, Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland, 1996, pp. 71-143.

My layout will appear old school on the outside, but hidden inside will be many high tech solutions.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Saturday, May 20, 2017 7:09 PM

Field trip to the Bay of Fundy today to search for near HO-scale sedimentary cliffs with layered rock faces. This is the best time of year because there are many new rock falls after the winter season. Found many great samples that will not require any additional work like the one in this picture.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, May 21, 2017 3:50 AM

Second layer of shale railbed is dry and fixed in place. Before the tracks and ballast are installed on this hopper loader demonstrator, every track (2 in this case) will be wired using mill-max contact probes. These spring-loaded contacts were designed to maintain electrical contact in vibration environments. You can see four of them next to my favourite HO scale seagull.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, May 21, 2017 4:39 AM

The optimum series resistance required for longlife operation of an LED depends on the source voltage and the LED colour. I am using a red LED for the pilot light on this demonstrator and only a few volts are needed for the motor in the rock so it's an easy calulation to find the closest standard resistor value.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,451 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:21 AM

OldSchoolScratchbuilder

Field trip to the Bay of Fundy today to search for near HO-scale sedimentary cliffs with layered rock faces. This is the best time of year because there are many new rock falls after the winter season. Found many great samples that will not require any additional work like the one in this picture.

 

Doggone it, for a moment I thought that you had placed that Chevy in front of a hot pastrami sandwich. Laugh

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:23 AM
Love that sandwich LOL.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:35 AM

Another beautiful spring morning, definitely back to the Bay of Fundy while the rock falls are fresh and the tide cycle is just right! Another few days and the tides will not allow me access to the beaches during the day for a few weeks. Headed to Baxters Harbour this time and my wife is coming along because there are two antique stores along the way. She will help me gather scenic material at my favourite hobby shop - the Bay of Fundy.

Very different cliff compositions here. Picture from my field trip there 3 years ago at high tide.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Southeast Texas
  • 4,769 posts
Posted by mobilman44 on Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:56 AM

Hot pastrami sandwich???   I thought it was a cowpie! 

ENJOY  !

 

Mobilman44

 

Living in southeast Texas, modeling the "postwar" Santa Fe and Illinois Central 

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!
Popular on ModelRailroader.com
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook