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New, OLD HO Person. Questions on HO-29 Central Midland

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    April, 2016
  • 20 posts
Posted by ShotgunLebowski on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 1:54 PM

Yeah , I see it labeled differently in a couple spots. I'm still defining what I want to do, and looking at pictures to find things I want to model. I'd like there to be the ability to just let trains run if I want, but then also have some puzzles for switching built in. 

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Posted by Chas 80 on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 5:18 PM

HO 29

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Posted by ShotgunLebowski on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 11:30 AM
That's an insane amount of detail lol!!! Are you fully done or still working on parts of it?
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Posted by Chas 80 on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 7:00 PM

Shotgun:

Thanks for noticing. Yes, there is a great deal of detail in my version of HO-29 and one of my reasons for choosing this particular plan. It was small enough so that one person, me, could build it in a reasonable amount of time and then focus on detailing and operating the layout.

The photo my wife so kindly posted for me was taken about three years ago. I am constantly removing some structures and adding others. Today I am reworking a street located next to the paper mill and brewery. In the recent past I lowered the main control panel. Why I chose to mount it as I did made no sense. Perhaps I was thinking of future projects.

Doing this provided me with enough space to add a small station in the place where the panel was. I also was able to add another yard track along the front edge of the yard. I had to lower the car card holder, but no problem.

The entire layout is lighted, buildings have interiors, and I have attempted to remain true to the time period ’58-’63. The Southern RR serves as my prototype choice, but the layout exists in a fictional place.

The layout runs on D.C. I am happy with that. I understand it. For previous layouts I used toggle switches and tortoise switch machine. This time I went   Atlas - electrical components, under the table switch machines. I was pleasantly surprised with the results. The track is all sectional. Again I am a happy camper because I have kink free curves for the first time in my layout building. Turnouts too far to reach are activated by buttons located on the control panel. For the reachable yard turnouts I used Caboose Hobby ground throws.

Anyway - I continue to be busy enough and do not foresee running out of things to do.

Chas 80 
 

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Posted by ShotgunLebowski on Thursday, April 21, 2016 9:34 AM

I've got an NCE Power Cab and Have decided to go that route. A lot of my older locomotives won't really make sense to upgrade but we are talking about late 80's DC engines, and nothing i'm really attached too. I have a bit of space so I am planning on taking advantage of it as much as possible. 

 

John

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Posted by ShotgunLebowski on Sunday, May 01, 2016 9:10 PM

I've been tossing around ideas with Anyrail. This version isn't totally baked but curious what people think. 

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Northern CA Bay Area
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Posted by cuyama on Monday, May 02, 2016 1:40 PM

Google drive makes your plan tricky for others to view with this forum's software, unfortunately.

I see a location or two on your plan where you might have potentially troublesome s-curves. For “donut”-style designs, I like to try to use all areas: inside, outside, and against the wall. This very rough sketch is not to-scale, but gives an idea.

In your same space, I would personally prefer some kind of a walk-in design, like the very rough sketch below. Some access hatches would be needed for maintenance or derailments, but it’s nice not to be required to duck under all the time (in my view). Adding a double-sided backdrop can create independent scenes.

Good luck with your layout

Byron

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Posted by ShotgunLebowski on Monday, May 02, 2016 3:43 PM

What's the best way to attach images? I have tried my google drive and also my one drive, same results. 

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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, May 02, 2016 3:55 PM

ShotgunLebowski

What's the best way to attach images? I have tried my google drive and also my one drive, same results.

Google does not give you a link that ends in .jpg.  Photobucket does, I have done in Flickr, but I'm not sure how I did it. 

Instructions are here

http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/88/t/249194.aspx

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by ShotgunLebowski on Monday, May 02, 2016 4:53 PM

Another half baked one i've been playing around with for a few days.. 

 

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Posted by ShotgunLebowski on Monday, May 09, 2016 8:52 PM

I do like the idea of a walk in without having to duck. This plan is 28" curves instead of the 30" but gives me 4 areas for main scenes plus nice long main line runs. 

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Northern CA Bay Area
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Posted by cuyama on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 11:36 AM

I often try for fewer turnback curves (or "blobs"), as in the “two blob” rough sketch I posted earlier. Doing so often allows for more straight runs of track, creating good locations for yards and other elements. This is because there is overall less curvature with fewer turnback curves (although the running length may be a little less).

The “three blob” M-shaped plan you posted can certainly work, but it’s a little harder to see where a yard might be placed, for example.

Good luck with your layout.

Byron

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Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, September 06, 2017 11:02 AM

Chas 80

After years of reading the M.R. forums, this particular post prompted me to join in. While new to the forum, I have been an active model railroader for many years. Like so many others, my first experience with model railroading was the Lionel Christmas present left under the tree.

I started modeling for real in the early 70s. At the time I was living in Aspen, CO. Caboose Hobbies was always a stop whenever visiting Denver. I have completed five layouts. Each was one dismantled when we moved on to other homes. My scale choice has been HO. I remember brass track & fiber ties. Technological improvements have made modeling much more enjoyable for me. It is possible to build a layout that is pretty much bullet proof if one is willing to spend the time.

My first two layouts were built in garages. Space was not a problem, but being removed from the house was an issue. My next two layouts were in attic or loft spaces - neither spacious nor comfortable.

I doubt that there are many track plans I have not studied. The HO29 Central Midland always interested me and became a favorite of mine.

In June of 2004 my wife and I retired and moved into a new home that just happened to have a spare room that could house both our hobbies - computer/photography for her and MRing for me. Best of all - HO29 would just fit.

The point of all of this is that I am delighted with the layout. I have to disagree with the nay-sayers. I do not find the plan too track dense, the grades too steep or the curve radii too constricting. I also enjoy being able to work the yard while having the other trains doing the loop-de-loop.

I did slightly modify the plan, but my railroad is for all intents and purposes HO 29   . It has give me 10+ years of fun and still provides me with more things to do.

I hope my photographer/wife can capture some of my RR. for you to see.

 

I agree with you. I had a lot of fun with my Central Midland layout. Granted I do like to watch trains run while I do some other work, but I added a turntable scene and expanded the yard tracks, and added some staging.

My original postings and photos got erased on another forum likely due to some software mod they were doing. So I decided to resurect it on another forum:

http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/31007

...and check out this video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mv5hRzGUEFE

 

PS:

Many model RRs are condensed versions of actual prototype RRs. This RR is not one of those. Rather it is a very condensed version of as-large-a-number of different scenes as one might find on a wide variety of model RRs. Per some of the ‘backdrop signs ’posted in the photos, it was intended that the trains would travel through a mountainous scene, thru the rolling foothills of farmland, and thru a big cityscape.

That’s a pretty tall order for such a small model RR. Some might say too much, but I believe once it is all finished and scenery added with trees, rocks, painted backdrops, etc, it can pull it off.

This RR is for someone who likes to run trains, as well as do some intricate switching work. You can put the twin mainlines into continuous running mode, while you deal with the intricate movements of steam engines in the roundtable/roundhouse area, supplying the coaling tower, diesel & freight yard train shuffling, container loading, quarry & warehouse sidings, and the make-up of trains in the staging area. You can also manage to turn some very long trains around to run the layout in the reverse direction via the double wye’s, and the extended tracks of the additional staging area.

 

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  • 201 posts
Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, September 06, 2017 11:18 AM

Running Trains

So I could run 2 long trains continuously around the layout, another short train around loop under turntable, a turntable operation, and a freight yard switching operation all at the same time. Then I was considering a logging train loop in the 'mountains'.

  • Member since
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  • 201 posts
Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, September 06, 2017 11:23 AM

Problems

Two major problems I found:
1) having to duck under that layot all the time to work on items not near the edge

2) a number of the radius tracks were just too tight for long articulated locos or even 6 axle diesels with really small flange wheels.

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