Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Ogden & Cache Valley RR - Layout Construction

42696 views
298 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Saturday, March 25, 2017 2:21 PM

I have finished installing all of the track that will service Ogden (and connect with the staging yard in the model workshop). This area on the right will be a highrise downtown city scene with large buildings up to 40"-44" tall.



I combined two Downtown Deco 36"x2" warehouse 'flat' kits along the wall as a proof of concept. I plan to have about 14-16 ft of narrow depth/flats warehouses/industries along that stretch of wall.This combined warehouse kit is 72" long.





There's plenty of space along the wall for more structures/flats.





I ran a 12ga track power bus and a bunch of track feeders for all the track in the city. I also connected to the track in the model workshop, and I was able to run trains in/out of the model workshop form the main layout room.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • 23 posts
Posted by wdw3082 on Saturday, March 25, 2017 7:07 PM
Hello Ogden. I live in Seminole County.Winter Springs to be exact and yes i do work for a Mouse. 35 years.
  • Member since
    January, 2008
  • From: Big Blackfoot River
  • 2,728 posts
Posted by Geared Steam on Sunday, March 26, 2017 9:42 AM

You're building my dream layout and obviously a very busy man, but may I suggest you continue to chronical this build for a possible future book release from one of the model railroad publications? From architect drawings of the garage/layout room and workshop to operations and final photos.

I would buy it in a heartbeat. 

"The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination."-Albert Einstein

http://gearedsteam.blogspot.com/

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Monday, April 03, 2017 1:26 AM

Starting to work on enclosing the helix. First I installed additional wood framing for mounting the 1/8" masonite panels.



This is where the helix display/control panel will be mounted.



I mounted additional vertical 2x4s to provide more support for achieving a smooth curve of the 1/8" masonite panels.



All the 1/8" panels are mounted andnow I'm working getting the screws counter-sunk appropriately in order to patch/fair them.







First step of patching/fairing the screw holes and seams.





The helix as viewed thru the opening where the helix display/control panel will be located.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Wednesday, April 05, 2017 5:03 PM

I finished patching/fairing/sanding/fairing/sanding the screw holes and seams. Wiped it down with a damp rag and now it's ready to prime.



This is the current proposed template for the helix control/display panel.



After 2 coats of primer. All of the 'pink' wall panels will be eventually painted the same color as the room walls and the helix enclosure: Sherwin Williams "Gauzy White" SW6035.



2 coats of primer. I use two coats of Zinser primer on the masonite because the Masonite is very dark and it has a glossy finish.



After painting the enclosure the Sherwin Williams SW6035 'Gauzy White'.





I have removed these (removable) backdrop panels in order to paint their backsides the Gauzy White wall color.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    June, 2007
  • From: Northern Virginia
  • 4,905 posts
Posted by riogrande5761 on Thursday, April 06, 2017 6:33 AM

Looking good onewolf!  It's nice to see the painted panels going in to give a more finished look to the layout fascia's etc.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

Contrarian's contrarian
  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Sunday, April 09, 2017 7:34 AM

I've painted some of the wall panels that drop from the ceiling the room wall color 'Gauzy White'. On the right side here I have attached a strip (pink) on the end cap that I need to caulk and paint.  The view from the entry door while on a 3ft step ladder:



I plan to install 1" trim molding along the top of the wall panels at the ceiling joint to hide the gaps.



Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Sunday, April 23, 2017 4:26 PM

Starting to work on the next upper level wall panels. Patching/fairing/sanding and then primer/paint.



I have six sections of track in the lower/middle levels around the center platform where turnouts on the mainline connect with service/spur track that will be mounted directly to the foam base. They require transition sections of roadbed to drop down from the 3/16" Woodland Scenics 'mainline' foam roadbed. I use cork roadbed for these tapered transition sections and they are 24-26" long. I will add caulk at the end of the cork to finish the transition.



After I painted the next (right) section of upper wall panels.



It looks much better (finished) looking with the ugly pinkish panels painted room wall color.



I painted another section of the upper level wall panels. They are on the left as you enter the room.





I also painted the raw cut edge of the plywood base roadbed of the upper return loop and the perimeter 2x4 risers that support the plywood/foam base of Franklin, Idaho above.



Eventually I am going to have to decide what color I am going to paint the fascia masonite. It will probably either flat black, dark brown, or dark green.



The (sort of) visible portion of the upper return loop and staging track loops. It's not visible when standing on the floor in the main aisle.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    August, 2003
  • From: Canada
  • 1,178 posts
Posted by wickman on Sunday, April 23, 2017 9:03 PM

amazing

  • Member since
    February, 2007
  • From: Shenandoah Valley The Home Of Patsy Cline
  • 1,785 posts
Posted by superbe on Monday, April 24, 2017 11:00 AM

Magnificent layout but when I see it I can't help but think of the track painting and ballasting. 

That's when the fun Big Smile will begin.

Bob

  • Member since
    February, 2007
  • From: East central Missouri
  • 990 posts
Posted by Santa Fe all the way! on Saturday, June 10, 2017 4:40 AM

Amazing layout, I've thoroughly enjoyed every post! It's been a while, can you give us an update? 

Come on CMW, make a '41-'46 Chevy school bus!
  • Member since
    February, 2007
  • From: East central Missouri
  • 990 posts
Posted by Santa Fe all the way! on Sunday, July 02, 2017 5:54 AM

Everything OK? It's been quite a while since you last posted. 

Come on CMW, make a '41-'46 Chevy school bus!
  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Sunday, July 09, 2017 8:24 AM

I took about two months off from the layout construction to deal with purchasing a property in TN, and then prep boat/trailer/dive gear/UW photo equipment/etc for two weeks vacation in Marathon in May and then 'paycheck' work got extremely busy late May and all of June. I started back on the layout construction about two weeks ago.

When I needed to purchase more Foamular rigid insulation sheets for above the upper return loop Home Despot was out of the 3/4" sheets so I bought/used 1" sheets. The 1" sheets are much stiffer and they had some 'bowing' that I could not eliminate when I glued them down. Therefore I had to make 'cuts' through the slight rises in order to flatten them for track laying. You can see the 'cuts' beyond the turnouts.



Using caulk to smooth out the rough foam.



When I originally designed the layout I wasn't sure whether I was going to model the Union Pacific from Pocatello towards Butte or the Oregon Short Line from Ogden to Cache Junction and the Cache Valley branch line. Since I chose Ogden/OSL/Cache Valley I subsequently redesigned the double track mainline as it leaves the Ogden yard closer to the prototype.

Before redesigning and rebuilding the mainline track as it exits the Ogden yard where the single track mainline represents the OSL.



Theorizing how a #8 right hand and #8 double slip switch might work to provide a turnout leading into the Oregon Short Line.



After pulling up the old track and foam road bed.



Gluing down the Woodland Scenics foam roadbed using DAP DynaFlex 230.



I used the opportunity of laying another mainline track to flatten out a slight hump in the homasote for the existing mainline track.



Working on laying the new inside mainline track.



Installing the 'inside' mainline track.





Gluing down the new Oregon Short Line mainline track.





The new double track mainline as it runs behind what will be the turntable/roundhouse area.



I finished caulking the edges/seams of the lower and middle level foam and painted them to hide the purple/pink foam insulation color. I also began DRY placing the service spur track in these areas to see how I like their 'look'. I also painted the bracket that supports the middle level shelf. I need to install/paint the brackets for the other two corners.



I am using Micro Engineering code 70 track and Micro Engineering code 70 #6 turnouts for the service spurs. I still find the Micro Engineering track to be extremely difficult to get smooth flowing curves (compared to the Atlas and Peco flex track).



The 'right' mainline track is electrically isolated with a 16" stretch of 'dead' track and will be setup as a DCC programming track. The 'left' mainline track is electrically dead to minimize chance of locos running off edge of layout. :)



Closeup of the OSL interchane Walthers #8 double slip turnout.







The outskirts of Brigham City will be located on the left.



I finished laying the track and turnouts for Franklin Idaho at the end of the Cache Valley Branch above the mainline upper return loop. I still need to fill in missing ties where flex track joints are.



Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • From: Richmond, VA
  • 1,350 posts
Posted by carl425 on Sunday, July 09, 2017 10:54 AM

I am a strong believer in doing what you want on your own railroad, so feel free to ignore the following opinion, but in case you care about the nickpicking visitors you'll have to your layout in the future...

A double slip switch?  This is an extremely rare piece of trackwork usually found only in congested urban terminals.  I would think it highly unlikely that in wide open Utah where the RR has all the room they need and then some, that they would use a double slip.  Even ignoring the fact that there is plenty of space available for a more traditional arrangement, why would they use such a high maintenance piece of trackwork in a remote spot where crews would have to travel so far to keep it working?

I usually keep such observations to myself, but this just doesn't fit in with the level of quality you've put into the rest this impressive layout.

I have the right to remain silent.  By posting here I have given up that right and accept that anything I say can and will be used as evidence to critique me.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Sunday, July 09, 2017 3:18 PM

carl425

I am a strong believer in doing what you want on your own railroad, so feel free to ignore the following opinion, but in case you care about the nickpicking visitors you'll have to your layout in the future...

A double slip switch?  This is an extremely rare piece of trackwork usually found only in congested urban terminals.  I would think it highly unlikely that in wide open Utah where the RR has all the room they need and then some, that they would use a double slip.  Even ignoring the fact that there is plenty of space available for a more traditional arrangement, why would they use such a high maintenance piece of trackwork in a remote spot where crews would have to travel so far to keep it working?

I usually keep such observations to myself, but this just doesn't fit in with the level of quality you've put into the rest this impressive layout.

 
Dutifully ignored.  Big Smile
 
While the UP may have had vast quantities of space to implement 'the prototype' I have relatively very little and even less canvas since this is a redo of the original design.  It's not like UP used #8 and #6 turnouts either.  :)
 
The double slip provided an elegant (IMHO) solution to crossing over a double track mainline in minimal space.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 7,659 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 1:52 AM

Onewolf:

Without wishing to belabour the point, could you have used a double curved turnout towards the end of the curves close to the existing double crossover and then a simple right hand turnout where the double crossover turnout is? I recognize that the radii of the two curved tracks might be larger than a double curved turnout.

I'm not being critical of your design. I'm just asking the question for the sake of my own edification.

Thanks,

Dave

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:02 AM

The curve on the double track mainline has radii 40" and 37 3/4" and easements entering the straight track.  That would require handlaid curved turnouts.  That's way beyond my pay grade.   Dead

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,567 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:06 AM

Onewolf

 

 
carl425

I am a strong believer in doing what you want on your own railroad, so feel free to ignore the following opinion, but in case you care about the nickpicking visitors you'll have to your layout in the future...

A double slip switch?  This is an extremely rare piece of trackwork usually found only in congested urban terminals.  I would think it highly unlikely that in wide open Utah where the RR has all the room they need and then some, that they would use a double slip.  Even ignoring the fact that there is plenty of space available for a more traditional arrangement, why would they use such a high maintenance piece of trackwork in a remote spot where crews would have to travel so far to keep it working?

I usually keep such observations to myself, but this just doesn't fit in with the level of quality you've put into the rest this impressive layout.

 

 

 
Dutifully ignored.  Big Smile
 
While the UP may have had vast quantities of space to implement 'the prototype' I have relatively very little and even less canvas since this is a redo of the original design.  It's not like UP used #8 and #6 turnouts either.  :)
 
The double slip provided an elegant (IMHO) solution to crossing over a double track mainline in minimal space.
 

I'm certain that you didn't post those photos of the double slip to invite criticism, but I agree with Carl that there appear to be better alternatives than the double slip.

I have a double slip turnout on my layout that is used like yours to cross over the inner mainline from the outer mainline to reach a small downtown passenger station tucked along side a much larger downtown passenger station. It is, to use your words, an elegant solution to crossing over a double track mainline in minimal space.

But, aside from the issue of prototypicality, there is the issue of operational complexity. The use of a double slip requires the throwing of two sets of points, and that is not as easy as it sounds. In my case, I use bi-polar LEDs on a control panel to indicate the route. The primary route is the crossover of the inner mainline from the outer mainline to reach the passenger station tracks. That part is simple enough. But it gets more complicated when choosing the other routes. In fact, it is even more confusing and difficult than the operation of a 3-way turnout.

I would encourage you to look for other solutions.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 8:24 AM

Because there will be no 'traffic' on the other side of the double track mainline only one side of the double slip ever needs to get thrown. The points on the other side will be fixed.  Which simplifies operation.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,567 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 10:53 AM

Onewolf

Because there will be no 'traffic' on the other side of the double track mainline only one side of the double slip ever needs to get thrown. The points on the other side will be fixed.  Which simplifies operation.

 

In that case, have you considered a crossing instead of the double slip?

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 12:15 PM

richhotrain
Onewolf

Because there will be no 'traffic' on the other side of the double track mainline only one side of the double slip ever needs to get thrown. The points on the other side will be fixed.  Which simplifies operation.

 

In that case, have you considered a crossing instead of the double slip?

Rich

 

A crossing won't work.  The #8 RH turnout on the inside track will always be thrown.  The 'yard' side of the double slip will always be thrown towards the afore-mentioned RH turnout.  The other side of the double slip will allow switching between routing to the outside mainline track for OSL Southbound trains or crossing over for northbound OSL trains from the inside mainline through the RH turnout.  Not sure if that makes sense but if you follow these two routes on the photo you can see that only one set of points needs to move. Ever.

Edited to add diagram.

OSL Southbound trains will always take path #1.

Trains going OSL Northbound will allways take path #2.

Only turnout points #3 need to move to route between #1 and #2.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,567 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 2:44 PM

Onewolf

A crossing won't work.  The #8 RH turnout on the inside track will always be thrown.  The 'yard' side of the double slip will always be thrown towards the afore-mentioned RH turnout.  The other side of the double slip will allow switching between routing to the outside mainline track for OSL Southbound trains or crossing over for northbound OSL trains from the inside mainline through the RH turnout.  Not sure if that makes sense but if you follow these two routes on the photo you can see that only one set of points needs to move. Ever.

That's what I was referring to as operational complexity. You wouldn't think that such a dual point configuration would work, but it will.....as long as northbound and southbound trains run only in those predetermined directions.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 3:04 PM

richhotrain

 

That's what I was referring to as operational complexity. You wouldn't think that such a dual point configuration would work, but it will.....as long as northbound and southbound trains run only in those predetermined directions.

Rich

 

The only other direction possible would be to take the west-bound double track mainline off the edge of the benchwork onto the floor. Smile That's one reason why the double track mainline is electrically dead.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,567 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 3:12 PM

Onewolf
 
richhotrain

 

That's what I was referring to as operational complexity. You wouldn't think that such a dual point configuration would work, but it will.....as long as northbound and southbound trains run only in those predetermined directions.

Rich 

The only other direction possible would be to take the west-bound double track mainline off the edge of the benchwork onto the floor. Smile That's one reason why the double track mainline is electrically dead. 

Yeah, I see that. Why do you have those two dead end tracks? Is that for prototypical purposes?  

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 3:47 PM

Those tracks represent the Union Pacific double track mainline that heads west to Nevada from Ogden. 

The track closer to the aisle will be wired as a DCC programming track (RH turnout, then 16" dead isolation track, and then DCC programming track).

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    September, 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 16,567 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 3:56 PM

Onewolf

Those tracks represent the Union Pacific double track mainline that heads west to Nevada from Ogden. 

The track closer to the aisle will be wired as a DCC programming track (RH turnout, then 16" dead isolation track, and then DCC programming track).

 

Got it.  Well thought out track plan!  Yes

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    September, 2014
  • 235 posts
Posted by JEREMY CENTANNI on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 10:30 PM

Impressed as always, nice to see the work still going forward!

I ever make it out your way I will bring anything from my collection that you want to see run! Fellow UP guy here :-)

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: North Dakota
  • 7,519 posts
Posted by BroadwayLion on Thursday, July 13, 2017 7:47 PM

There is nothing better than a double slip switch

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 279 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Friday, August 04, 2017 5:11 AM

I used a 12" piano hinge to mount the control/display panel for the helix area and I used a magnetic latch to hold it closed.



A wider view of the helix control/status panel.



The view of the helix with the panel door open.



I plan to locate the Laser 3 Modeling "John Murray & Sons Coal Distribution" craftsman kit in this location. I have installed the spur track that will service this facility.



I have shaped/glued/wired all the Micro Engineering code 70 service/spur track around the center platform on the lower and middle levels.



It took quite a while to figure out how to shape the Micro Engineering track so it has reasonably smooth/flowing curves. I have also caulked/painted the remaining two shelf support brackets that support the middle levels on the corners of the center platform.



There will be numerous businesses/industries supported by the track around the center platform on the lower/middle levels.



A wider view of the lower and middle levels.



Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!
Popular on ModelRailroader.com
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook