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Masonite for subroadbed?

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Masonite for subroadbed?
Posted by Mister Mikado on Sunday, April 20, 2014 6:55 PM

Is this a good idea on a cookie cutter setup? Eighth inch masonite seems easy to cut, lightweight and strong. Will glue it to the wood uprights. How about the noise factor though?

Thanks all.

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Posted by Bayfield Transfer Railway on Sunday, April 20, 2014 7:11 PM
What scale? I wouldn't use it for HO, I'm not sure about N. It might work OK for Z but I couldn't swear to it.

Disclaimer:  This post may contain humor, sarcasm, and/or flatulence.

Michael Mornard

Bringing the North Woods to South Dakota!

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Posted by peahrens on Sunday, April 20, 2014 7:26 PM

I imagine it depends on the span you intend between supports.  The stuff is pretty flexible, so while it may not break with a bit of weight applied it may sag pretty easily.  I used 5/8" plywood with average 15-18" support spacings.  Don't forget you may add adjacent scenery (eg, cardboard strip method) and the subroadbed will be an important part of supporting anything near it.

Paul

Modeling HO with a transition era UP bent

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Posted by wp8thsub on Sunday, April 20, 2014 7:27 PM

Not a plan unless you laminate it for greater thickness.  Hardboard sags badly between supports if used in any of the normal thicknesses available from 1/8" through 1/4" when used in a cookie-cutter configuration.  Scale really doesn't matter, as the weight of the trains above doesn't determine material performance.  It will sag under its own weight.

Hardboard IS useful on edge for laminating into spline roadbed.  I have a lot of it, with 10 strips of 3/16" material cut 1" thick.

Rob Spangler

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Posted by jrbernier on Sunday, April 20, 2014 7:32 PM

  Masonite(even 1/4") will 'sag', even on 12" centers.  The 'noise' factor will be about as bad as foam.  And you will need to glue your roadbed/track to it - small spikes/nails will only work if you 'pre-drill'.  

  I did watch a seminar at a NMRA convention where a layout was carved out of layers of 2" thick foam, and Masonite strips were glued to the foan to make very smooth grades.  The builder then glued Homabed to the Masonite and hand spiked his track.  The results were nice, but it seemed like a lot of work.

Jim

Modeling BNSF  and Milwaukee Road in SW Wisconsin

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Posted by zstripe on Monday, April 21, 2014 5:17 AM

I would not use it, even if I got it free, for sub-roadbed. For the most part, of the reason's already given. Fascia, back-drop.

Big Smile

Frank

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Posted by mobilman44 on Monday, April 21, 2014 5:49 AM

Yup, masonite makes excellent coves for corner backdrops, and can be used for a lot of small modeling projects (scratch and kit bash types).  But I would not use it for sub roadbed or the like.   I sheet of good quality 1/2 inch or so plywood would be a much better approach.

From my experience, you never know how long you will have the layout.  Perhaps it will never be finished, or perhaps it will be with you for decades to come.  Soooo, I suggest you do the best you can on the benchwork - the foundation of your layout.

ENJOY  !

 

Mobilman44

 

Living in southeast Texas, modeling the "postwar" Santa Fe and Illinois Central 

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Posted by BroadwayLion on Monday, April 21, 2014 10:23 AM

LION used CELOTEX for the layout of him, but while the Celotex company is alive and well, they stopped making this signature product once fire codes were invented. Lightweight, very stable does not sag...

Homasote is similare, but is very heavy, and even that will sag a little on long spans, due to its weight.

Here at the Abbey, we are rebuilding the sacristy, and new ceiling tiles are being placed. These are 2' x 4' and do not sag, as they are intended to bridge this size span. Light weight easy to cut, I am sure that they will work well on 12" or even 16" centers. The down side is that they are fragile. But maybe not that fragile. If I had to build some more lines on my railroad I would look at this product.

Find a tile or two somewhere, even if you have to buy them at a big-box-home-store, and TRY them to see if they will fit your requirements.

HARDBOARD is NOT for tracks. PERIOD.

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

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Posted by BATMAN on Monday, April 21, 2014 10:46 AM

BroadwayLion
HARDBOARD is NOT for tracks. PERIOD.

I think hardboard makes wonderful roadbed and subroadbed all in one. You just have to remember to turn it on its side. 48' for under $10.00 is a bargain a Lion should appreciate.Smile, Wink & Grin

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, April 21, 2014 11:59 AM

My subroadbed is primarily 2-inch foam, which works very well.  In some parts of my layout, though, I have subways running close beneath the surface.  Where I have surface tracks crossing subway tracks, or surface scenery where I don't want to add a lot of height, I've used Masonite.

Mostly, it's worked OK, but the spans are fairly small, typically only a few inches.  On the one area where I had to use a bigger piece of Masonite, I have experienced sagging problems from time to time, and I've had to add additional supports to bring it back up to level.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by railandsail on Thursday, August 03, 2017 6:23 PM

MisterBeasley

  In some parts of my layout, though, I have subways running close beneath the surface.  Where I have surface tracks crossing subway tracks, or surface scenery where I don't want to add a lot of height, I've used Masonite.

Mostly, it's worked OK, but the spans are fairly small, typically only a few inches.  On the one area where I had to use a bigger piece of Masonite, I have experienced sagging problems from time to time, and I've had to add additional supports to bring it back up to level.

Masonite is a sort of 'tempered hardboard' that stands up to humid and temp differences better than some of the other OSB, particle boards, etc type materials. Would that be a fair statement?

If I were to glue two layers of masonite together securely should I expect them to perform a bridging capability of one track passing over the top of another track? Like Beasley above I am looking to maintain a low height of the one track over the other.
I just thought this double layer of tempered hardboard would do the job?

HO scale

 

 

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Posted by gregc on Thursday, August 03, 2017 6:39 PM

Mister Mikado
Is this a good idea on a cookie cutter setup? Eighth inch masonite seems easy to cut, lightweight and strong. Will glue it to the wood uprights. How about the noise factor though?

I think masonite is tough on cutting tools.   harder to nail or screw without predrilling.   will transmitt sound.   i used luan with foam glued on top.

good for spline roadbead

 k

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by lifeontheranch on Thursday, August 03, 2017 7:13 PM

railandsail

Masonite is a sort of 'tempered hardboard' that stands up to humid and temp differences better than some of the other OSB, particle boards, etc type materials. Would that be a fair statement?

Yes. However, if the humidity is so high for so long that if affects OSB then you are going to have a slew of other moisture related issues. The Masonite bridge would be the least of your worries.

railandsail

If I were to glue two layers of masonite together securely should I expect them to perform a bridging capability of one track passing over the top of another track? Like Beasley above I am looking to maintain a low height of the one track over the other.
I just thought this double layer of tempered hardboard would do the job?

HO scale

Or just use a thicker piece of hardboard. It is all about the span. A short span of a couple two three inches certainly wouldn't be a problem. Beyond that I wouldn't trust hardboard not to sag over time. Stuff is awesome when used on edge, not so much when used flat.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Thursday, August 03, 2017 7:27 PM

railandsail

 

 
MisterBeasley

  In some parts of my layout, though, I have subways running close beneath the surface.  Where I have surface tracks crossing subway tracks, or surface scenery where I don't want to add a lot of height, I've used Masonite.

Mostly, it's worked OK, but the spans are fairly small, typically only a few inches.  On the one area where I had to use a bigger piece of Masonite, I have experienced sagging problems from time to time, and I've had to add additional supports to bring it back up to level.

 

Masonite is a sort of 'tempered hardboard' that stands up to humid and temp differences better than some of the other OSB, particle boards, etc type materials. Would that be a fair statement?

If I were to glue two layers of masonite together securely should I expect them to perform a bridging capability of one track passing over the top of another track? Like Beasley above I am looking to maintain a low height of the one track over the other.
I just thought this double layer of tempered hardboard would do the job?

HO scale

 

 

 

I used 1/8 masonite as well because of a clearance problem.  It was on my lowest level beyond where my sawmill will go so I can back more cars down there.  It spans a 3" two track N scale tunnel with many tracks running over above.  I painted both sides of the masonite to avoid future moisture absorption problems.  I think masonite works well for short spans when you have a low clearance issue.

Edit.    Honestly..... I wouldn't even think about using Masonite for sub roadbed.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Thursday, August 03, 2017 8:13 PM

A more of an aerial view.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Thursday, August 03, 2017 8:28 PM

I used 1 8 inch Masonite on the curved kit bashed girder bridge to the left. This picture does not reveal it but if you notice the gaps there's a Viaduct below where coal trucks will run through to the coal mine.

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Posted by railandsail on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 9:33 AM

Just caught up with the new replies on this subject thread. I didn't realize that one had to independantly subscribe to each subject thread that one posted to. I thought it was automatic if you made a posting to the thread?

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Posted by BMMECNYC on Thursday, August 17, 2017 8:10 PM

railandsail

Just caught up with the new replies on this subject thread. I didn't realize that one had to independantly subscribe to each subject thread that one posted to. I thought it was automatic if you made a posting to the thread?

 

It will show up in "your discussions" in your account management box on the right hand side of the screen.  You will not get notifications, unless you subscribe to the thread.

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.

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